The Music of the Spheres: The Dawn of Gravitational Wave Science

The LIGO results are among the greatest experimental achievements of all times. Time and again scientists have compared this feat to Galileo pointing his telescope to the sky, offering instead an 'ear' to the cosmos. After the remarkable landmark of detection, the physics community will soon turn into the study of the properties of the sources, addressing fundamental questions in astrophysics and cosmology. A combined numerical and analytic effort to tackle the binary problem is of paramount importance in light of the nascent program of multi-messenger astronomy. The century of gravitational wave science is in the making, and many discoveries are yet to come in the advent of a new era of 'precision gravity'.

Comments: 6 pages. 5 figures. Popular article for 'Mr. Science'. English version. (The Chinese version can be found in http://mp.aiweibang.com/m/u/24871/n)

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