Joint CTC-Attention based End-to-End Speech Recognition using Multi-task Learning

Recently, there has been an increasing interest in end-to-end speech recognition that directly transcribes speech to text without any predefined alignments. One approach is the attention-based encoder-decoder framework that learns a mapping between variable-length input and output sequences in one step using a purely data-driven method. The attention model has often been shown to improve the performance over another end-to-end approach, the Connectionist Temporal Classification (CTC), mainly because it explicitly uses the history of the target character without any conditional independence assumptions. However, we observed that the attention model has shown poor results especially in noisy condition and is hard to be trained in the initial training stage with long input sequences, as compared with CTC. This is because the attention model is too flexible to predict proper alignments in such cases due to the lack of left-to-right constraints as used in CTC. This paper presents a novel method for end-to-end speech recognition to improve robustness and achieve fast convergence by using a joint CTC-attention model within the multi-task learning framework, thereby mitigating the alignment issue. An experiment on the WSJ and CHiME-4 tasks demonstrates its advantages over both the CTC and attention-based encoder-decoder baselines, showing 6.6-10.3% relative improvements in Character Error Rate (CER).


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2017Feb
Affiliations: 1Dept. of Computer Science, Sun Yat-Sen University, GuangZhou, China., 2Dept. of Computer Science, Sun Yat-Sen University, GuangZhou, China., 3Dept. of Computer Science, Sun Yat-Sen University, GuangZhou, China., 4Dept. of Computer Science, Sun Yat-Sen University, GuangZhou, China.

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