Fourier analysis of RGB fringe-projection profilometry and robust phase-demodulation methods against crosstalk distortion

In this paper we apply the frequency transfer function (FTF) formalism to analyze the red, green and blue (RGB) phase-shifting fringe-projection profilometry technique. The phase-shifted fringe patterns in RGB fringe projection are typically corrupted by crosstalk because the sensitivity curves of most projection-recording systems overlap. Crosstalk distortion needs to be compensated in order to obtain high quality measurements. We study phase-demodulation methods for null/mild, moderate, and severe levels of RGB crosstalk. For null/mild crosstalk, we can estimate the searched phase-map using Bruning's 3-step phase-shifting algorithm (PSA). For moderate crosstalk, the RGB recorded data is usually preprocessed before feeding it into Bruning's PSA; alternatively, in this paper we propose a computationally more efficient approach, which combines crosstalk compensation and phase-demodulation into a single process. For severe RGB crosstalk, we expect non-sinusoidal fringes' profiles (distorting harmonics) and significant uncertainties on the crosstalk calibration (which produces pseudo-detuning error). Analyzing these distorting phenomena, we conclude that squeezing interferometry is the most robust demodulation method for RGB fringe-projection techniques. We support our conclusions with numerical simulations and experimental results.

Comments: 12 pages, 11 figures

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