Y. Aimuratov

Y. Aimuratov
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High Energy Astrophysical Phenomena (6)
 
Cosmology and Nongalactic Astrophysics (2)
 
General Relativity and Quantum Cosmology (1)

Publications Authored By Y. Aimuratov

Theoretical and observational evidences have been recently gained for a two-fold classification of short bursts: 1) short gamma-ray flashes (S-GRFs), with isotropic energy $E_{iso}<10^{52}$~erg and no black hole (BH) formation, and 2) the authentic short gamma-ray bursts (S-GRBs), with isotropic energy $E_{iso}>10^{52}$~erg evidencing a BH formation in the binary neutron star merging process. The signature for the BH formation consists in the on-set of the high energy ($0.1$--$100$~GeV) emission, coeval to the prompt emission, in all S-GRBs. Read More

The long lasting attempt to identify the nature of X-ray flares, observed by Swift after the prompt emission of some long gamma ray bursts (GRBs), is here addressed within the context of a special subclass of long GRBs with isotropic energy $E_{iso} > 10^{52}$~erg, recently indicated as binary-driven hypernovae (BdHNe). Such BdHNe have as progenitor a tight binary system composed of a carbon-oxygen core (CO$_\mathrm{core}$) and a neutron star (NS) undergoing an induced gravitational collapse (IGC) to a black hole (BH) triggered by the CO$_\mathrm{core}$ explosion as a supernova (SN). Only in the case of such BdHNe, when analysed in the rest frame of the sources, the time of occurrence, the temporal duration, the X-ray luminosity and the total energy of the flares correlate with the $E_{iso}$. Read More

It has previously been discovered that there is a universal power law behavior exhibited by the late X-ray emission (LXRE) of a "golden sample" (GS) of six long energetic GRBs, when observed in the rest-frame of the source. This remarkable feature, independent of the different isotropic energy (E_iso) of each GRB, has been used to estimate the cosmological redshift of some long GRBs. This analysis is extended here to a new class of 161 long GRBs, all with E_iso > 10^52 erg. Read More

In a new classification of merging binary neutron stars (NSs) we separate short gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) in two sub-classes. The ones with $E_{iso}\lesssim10^{52}$ erg coalesce to form a massive NS and are indicated as short gamma-ray flashes (S-GRFs). The hardest, with $E_{iso}\gtrsim10^{52}$ erg, coalesce to form a black hole (BH) and are indicated as genuine short-GRBs (S-GRBs). Read More

GRBs, traditionally classified as "long" and "short", have been often assumed, till recently, to originate from a single black hole (BH) with an ultrarelativistic jetted emission. There is evidence that both long and short bursts have as progenitors merging and/or accreting binaries, each composed by a different combination of carbon-oxygen cores (CO$_{\rm core}$), neutron stars (NSs), BHs and white dwarfs (WDs). Consequently, the traditional long bursts have been sub-classified as (I) X-ray flashes (XRFs), (II) binary-driven hypernovae (BdHNe), and (III) BH-supernovae (BH-SNe). Read More

There is mounting evidence for the binary nature of the progenitors of gamma-ray bursts (GRBs). For a long GRB, the induced gravitational collapse (IGC) paradigm proposes as progenitor, or "in-state", a tight binary system composed of a carbon-oxygen core (CO$_{core}$) undergoing a supernova (SN) explosion which triggers hypercritical accretion onto a neutron star (NS) companion. For a short GRB, a NS-NS merger is traditionally adopted as the progenitor. Read More

We consider the propagation of X-ray and gamma ray emissions in strong magnetic and gravitational fields of the pulsar in nonlinear vacuum electrodynamics. We show that the radiation will spread from the pulsar to the detecting device in the form of two normal modes polarized in mutually orthogonal planes, and having different velocities. We have calculated the delay between the two modes, as they propagate from the pulsar to the detecting device. Read More