V. Sanz - CERN and York

V. Sanz
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Name
V. Sanz
Affiliation
CERN and York
City
York
Country
United Kingdom

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High Energy Physics - Phenomenology (49)
 
High Energy Physics - Experiment (21)
 
Cosmology and Nongalactic Astrophysics (9)
 
High Energy Astrophysical Phenomena (1)
 
General Relativity and Quantum Cosmology (1)
 
High Energy Physics - Theory (1)

Publications Authored By V. Sanz

Nanophotonics has become a key enabling technology in biomedicine with great promises in early diagnosis and less invasive therapies. In this context, the unique capability of plasmonic noble metal nanoparticles to concentrate light on the nanometer scale has widely contributed to biosensing and enhanced spectroscopy. Recently, high-refractive index dielectric nanostructures featuring low loss resonances have been proposed as a promising alternative to nanoplasmonics, potentially offering better sensing performances along with full compatibility with the microelectronics industry. Read More

We assess the status of Composite Higgs models in the light of the latest Run 2 Higgs data. Drawing from the extensive Composite Higgs literature, we collect together predictions for the modified couplings of the Higgs, in particular examining the different predictions for $\kappa_V$ and $\kappa_F$. Despite the variety and increasing complexity of models on the market, we point out that many independent models make identical predictions for these couplings. Read More

In the context of upcoming new physics searches at the LHC, we investigate the impact of multidimensional differential rates in typical LHC analyses. We discuss the properties of shape information, and argue that multidimensional rates bring limited information in the scope of a discovery, but can have a large impact on model discrimination. We also point out subtleties about systematic uncertainties cancellations and the Cauchy-Schwarz bound on interference terms. Read More

We study the leading effective interactions between the Standard Model fields and a generic singlet CP-odd (pseudo)Goldstone boson. Two possible frameworks for electroweak symmetry breaking are considered: linear and non-linear. For the latter case, the basis of leading effective operators is determined and compared with that for the linear expansion. Read More

We estimate the possible accuracies of measurements at the proposed CLIC $e^+e^-$ collider of Higgs and $W^+W^-$ production at centre-of-mass energies up to 3TeV, incorporating also Higgsstrahlung projections at higher energies that had not been considered previously, and use them to explore the prospective CLIC sensitivities to decoupled new physics. We present the resulting constraints on the Wilson coefficients of dimension-6 operators in a model-independent approach based on the Standard Model effective field theory (SM EFT). The higher centre-of-mass energy of CLIC, compared to other projects such as the ILC and CEPC, gives it greater sensitivity to the coefficients of some of the operators we study. Read More

We study the phenomenological consequences of several $CP$-violating structures that could arise in the Standard Model effective field theory framework. Focusing on operators involving electroweak gauge and/or Higgs bosons, we derive constraints originating from Run I LHC data. We then study the capabilities of the present and future LHC runs at higher energies to further probe associated CP-violating phenomena and we demonstrate how differential information can play a key role. Read More

2016Oct
Authors: D. de Florian1, C. Grojean2, F. Maltoni3, C. Mariotti4, A. Nikitenko5, M. Pieri6, P. Savard7, M. Schumacher8, R. Tanaka9, R. Aggleton10, M. Ahmad11, B. Allanach12, C. Anastasiou13, W. Astill14, S. Badger15, M. Badziak16, J. Baglio17, E. Bagnaschi18, A. Ballestrero19, A. Banfi20, D. Barducci21, M. Beckingham22, C. Becot23, G. Bélanger24, J. Bellm25, N. Belyaev26, F. U. Bernlochner27, C. Beskidt28, A. Biekötter29, F. Bishara30, W. Bizon31, N. E. Bomark32, M. Bonvini33, S. Borowka34, V. Bortolotto35, S. Boselli36, F. J. Botella37, R. Boughezal38, G. C. Branco39, J. Brehmer40, L. Brenner41, S. Bressler42, I. Brivio43, A. Broggio44, H. Brun45, G. Buchalla46, C. D. Burgard47, A. Calandri48, L. Caminada49, R. Caminal Armadans50, F. Campanario51, J. Campbell52, F. Caola53, C. M. Carloni Calame54, S. Carrazza55, A. Carvalho56, M. Casolino57, O. Cata58, A. Celis59, F. Cerutti60, N. Chanon61, M. Chen62, X. Chen63, B. Chokoufé Nejad64, N. Christensen65, M. Ciuchini66, R. Contino67, T. Corbett68, D. Curtin69, M. Dall'Osso70, A. David71, S. Dawson72, J. de Blas73, W. de Boer74, P. de Castro Manzano75, C. Degrande76, R. L. Delgado77, F. Demartin78, A. Denner79, B. Di Micco80, R. Di Nardo81, S. Dittmaier82, A. Dobado83, T. Dorigo84, F. A. Dreyer85, M. Dührssen86, C. Duhr87, F. Dulat88, K. Ecker89, K. Ellis90, U. Ellwanger91, C. Englert92, D. Espriu93, A. Falkowski94, L. Fayard95, R. Feger96, G. Ferrera97, A. Ferroglia98, N. Fidanza99, T. Figy100, M. Flechl101, D. Fontes102, S. Forte103, P. Francavilla104, E. Franco105, R. Frederix106, A. Freitas107, F. F. Freitas108, F. Frensch109, S. Frixione110, B. Fuks111, E. Furlan112, S. Gadatsch113, J. Gao114, Y. Gao115, M. V. Garzelli116, T. Gehrmann117, R. Gerosa118, M. Ghezzi119, D. Ghosh120, S. Gieseke121, D. Gillberg122, G. F. Giudice123, E. W. N. Glover124, F. Goertz125, D. Gonçalves126, J. Gonzalez-Fraile127, M. Gorbahn128, S. Gori129, C. A. Gottardo130, M. Gouzevitch131, P. Govoni132, D. Gray133, M. Grazzini134, N. Greiner135, A. Greljo136, J. Grigo137, A. V. Gritsan138, R. Gröber139, S. Guindon140, H. E. Haber141, C. Han142, T. Han143, R. Harlander144, M. A. Harrendorf145, H. B. Hartanto146, C. Hays147, S. Heinemeyer148, G. Heinrich149, M. Herrero150, F. Herzog151, B. Hespel152, V. Hirschi153, S. Hoeche154, S. Honeywell155, S. J. Huber156, C. Hugonie157, J. Huston158, A. Ilnicka159, G. Isidori160, B. Jäger161, M. Jaquier162, S. P. Jones163, A. Juste164, S. Kallweit165, A. Kaluza166, A. Kardos167, A. Karlberg168, Z. Kassabov169, N. Kauer170, D. I. Kazakov171, M. Kerner172, W. Kilian173, F. Kling174, K. Köneke175, R. Kogler176, R. Konoplich177, S. Kortner178, S. Kraml179, C. Krause180, F. Krauss181, M. Krawczyk182, A. Kulesza183, S. Kuttimalai184, R. Lane185, A. Lazopoulos186, G. Lee187, P. Lenzi188, I. M. Lewis189, Y. Li190, S. Liebler191, J. Lindert192, X. Liu193, Z. Liu194, F. J. Llanes-Estrada195, H. E. Logan196, D. Lopez-Val197, I. Low198, G. Luisoni199, P. Maierhöfer200, E. Maina201, B. Mansoulié202, H. Mantler203, M. Mantoani204, A. C. Marini205, V. I. Martinez Outschoorn206, S. Marzani207, D. Marzocca208, A. Massironi209, K. Mawatari210, J. Mazzitelli211, A. McCarn212, B. Mellado213, K. Melnikov214, S. B. Menari215, L. Merlo216, C. Meyer217, P. Milenovic218, K. Mimasu219, S. Mishima220, B. Mistlberger221, S. -O. Moch222, A. Mohammadi223, P. F. Monni224, G. Montagna225, M. Moreno Llácer226, N. Moretti227, S. Moretti228, L. Motyka229, A. Mück230, M. Mühlleitner231, S. Munir232, P. Musella233, P. Nadolsky234, D. Napoletano235, M. Nebot236, C. Neu237, M. Neubert238, R. Nevzorov239, O. Nicrosini240, J. Nielsen241, K. Nikolopoulos242, J. M. No243, C. O'Brien244, T. Ohl245, C. Oleari246, T. Orimoto247, D. Pagani248, C. E. Pandini249, A. Papaefstathiou250, A. S. Papanastasiou251, G. Passarino252, B. D. Pecjak253, M. Pelliccioni254, G. Perez255, L. Perrozzi256, F. Petriello257, G. Petrucciani258, E. Pianori259, F. Piccinini260, M. Pierini261, A. Pilkington262, S. Plätzer263, T. Plehn264, R. Podskubka265, C. T. Potter266, S. Pozzorini267, K. Prokofiev268, A. Pukhov269, I. Puljak270, M. Queitsch-Maitland271, J. Quevillon272, D. Rathlev273, M. Rauch274, E. Re275, M. N. Rebelo276, D. Rebuzzi277, L. Reina278, C. Reuschle279, J. Reuter280, M. Riembau281, F. Riva282, A. Rizzi283, T. Robens284, R. Röntsch285, J. Rojo286, J. C. Romão287, N. Rompotis288, J. Roskes289, R. Roth290, G. P. Salam291, R. Salerno292, R. Santos293, V. Sanz294, J. J. Sanz-Cillero295, H. Sargsyan296, U. Sarica297, P. Schichtel298, J. Schlenk299, T. Schmidt300, C. Schmitt301, M. Schönherr302, U. Schubert303, M. Schulze304, S. Sekula305, M. Sekulla306, E. Shabalina307, H. S. Shao308, J. Shelton309, C. H. Shepherd-Themistocleous310, S. Y. Shim311, F. Siegert312, A. Signer313, J. P. Silva314, L. Silvestrini315, M. Sjodahl316, P. Slavich317, M. Slawinska318, L. Soffi319, M. Spannowsky320, C. Speckner321, D. M. Sperka322, M. Spira323, O. Stål324, F. Staub325, T. Stebel326, T. Stefaniak327, M. Steinhauser328, I. W. Stewart329, M. J. Strassler330, J. Streicher331, D. M. Strom332, S. Su333, X. Sun334, F. J. Tackmann335, K. Tackmann336, A. M. Teixeira337, R. Teixeira de Lima338, V. Theeuwes339, R. Thorne340, D. Tommasini341, P. Torrielli342, M. Tosi343, F. Tramontano344, Z. Trócsányi345, M. Trott346, I. Tsinikos347, M. Ubiali348, P. Vanlaer349, W. Verkerke350, A. Vicini351, L. Viliani352, E. Vryonidou353, D. Wackeroth354, C. E. M. Wagner355, J. Wang356, S. Wayand357, G. Weiglein358, C. Weiss359, M. Wiesemann360, C. Williams361, J. Winter362, D. Winterbottom363, R. Wolf364, M. Xiao365, L. L. Yang366, R. Yohay367, S. P. Y. Yuen368, G. Zanderighi369, M. Zaro370, D. Zeppenfeld371, R. Ziegler372, T. Zirke373, J. Zupan374
Affiliations: 1eds., 2eds., 3eds., 4eds., 5eds., 6eds., 7eds., 8eds., 9eds., 10The LHC Higgs Cross Section Working Group, 11The LHC Higgs Cross Section Working Group, 12The LHC Higgs Cross Section Working Group, 13The LHC Higgs Cross Section Working Group, 14The LHC Higgs Cross Section Working Group, 15The LHC Higgs Cross Section Working Group, 16The LHC Higgs Cross Section Working Group, 17The LHC Higgs Cross Section Working Group, 18The LHC Higgs Cross Section Working Group, 19The LHC Higgs Cross Section Working Group, 20The LHC Higgs Cross Section Working Group, 21The LHC Higgs Cross Section Working Group, 22The LHC Higgs Cross Section Working Group, 23The LHC Higgs Cross Section Working Group, 24The LHC Higgs Cross Section Working Group, 25The LHC Higgs Cross Section Working Group, 26The LHC Higgs Cross Section Working Group, 27The LHC Higgs Cross Section Working Group, 28The LHC Higgs Cross Section Working Group, 29The LHC Higgs Cross Section Working Group, 30The LHC Higgs Cross 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This Report summarizes the results of the activities of the LHC Higgs Cross Section Working Group in the period 2014-2016. The main goal of the working group was to present the state-of-the-art of Higgs physics at the LHC, integrating all new results that have appeared in the last few years. The first part compiles the most up-to-date predictions of Higgs boson production cross sections and decay branching ratios, parton distribution functions, and off-shell Higgs boson production and interference effects. Read More

We study the impact of dimension-six operators of the standard model effective field theory relevant for vector-boson fusion and associated Higgs boson production at the LHC. We present predictions at the next-to-leading order accuracy in QCD that include matching to parton showers and that rely on fully automated simulations. We show the importance of the subsequent reduction of the theoretical uncertainties in improving the possible discrimination between effective field theory and standard model results, and we demonstrate that the range of the Wilson coefficient values allowed by a global fit to LEP and LHC Run~I data can be further constrained by LHC Run~II future results. Read More

This White Paper is an input to the ongoing discussion about the extension and refinement of simplified Dark Matter (DM) models. Based on two concrete examples, we show how existing simplified DM models (SDMM) can be extended to provide a more accurate and comprehensive framework to interpret and characterise collider searches. In the first example we extend the canonical SDMM with a scalar mediator to include mixing with the Higgs boson. Read More

We explore the possibility that physics at the TeV scale possesses approximate $N = 2$ supersymmetry, which is reduced to the $N=1$ minimal supersymmetric extension of the Standard Model (MSSM) at the electroweak scale. This doubling of supersymmetry modifies the Higgs sector of the theory, with consequences for the masses, mixings and couplings of the MSSM Higgs bosons, whose phenomenological consequences we explore in this paper. The mass of the lightest neutral Higgs boson $h$ is independent of $\tan \beta$ at the tree level, and the decoupling limit is realized whatever the values of the heavy Higgs boson masses. Read More

We analyze a simple extension of the Standard Model (SM) with a dark sector composed of a scalar and a fermion, both singlets under the SM gauge group but charged under a dark sector symmetry group. Sterile neutrinos, which are singlets under both groups, mediate the interactions between the dark sector and the SM particles, and generate masses for the active neutrinos via the seesaw mechanism. We explore the parameter space region where the observed Dark Matter relic abundance is determined by the annihilation into sterile neutrinos, both for fermion and scalar Dark Matter particles. Read More

In this paper we explore the possibility that the sterile neutrino and Dark Matter sectors in the Universe have a common origin. We study the consequences of this assumption in the simple case of coupling the dark sector to the Standard Model via a global $U(1)_{B-L}$, broken down spontaneously by a dark scalar. This dark scalar provides masses to the dark fermions and communicates with the Higgs via a Higgs portal coupling. Read More

We present the activities of the 'New Physics' working group for the 'Physics at TeV Colliders' workshop (Les Houches, France, 1-19 June, 2015). Our report includes new physics studies connected with the Higgs boson and its properties, direct search strategies, reinterpretation of the LHC results in the building of viable models and new computational tool developments. Important signatures for searches for natural new physics at the LHC and new assessments of the interplay between direct dark matter searches and the LHC are also considered. Read More

The standard experimental interpretation of the diphoton excess as a Kaluza-Klein graviton faces issues of compatibility with other constraints, particularly precision tests and direct searches for vector resonances. In this work we explain how to successfully incorporate this interpretation in the context of a holographic Composite Higgs setup, with the Higgs and top localised in the IR region of the extra dimension. We find that successful scenarios fall in the category of the so-called Little Randall-Sundrum models, as they require a low UV-scale of around 1000 TeV, which could explain why the resonance has so far evaded other searches. Read More

A spin-two resonance would have couplings to the SM, suppressed via higher-dimensional operators. Therefore, a sizeable cross-section would indicate that the scale of additional new phenomena cannot be too far above the 750 GeV mark. Below I present some theoretical arguments to place the resonance in a wider framework: a manifestation of new extra-dimensions, or a glueball of a new strong sector. Read More

We consider the possibility of interpreting the recently reported diphoton excess at 750 GeV as a spin-two massive particle (such as a Kaluza-Klein graviton in warped extra-dimensions) which serves as a mediator to Dark Matter via its gravitational couplings to the dark sector and to the Standard Model (SM). We model non-universal couplings of the resonance to gauge bosons in the SM and to Dark Matter as a function on their localization in the extra dimension. We find that scalar, fermion or vector dark matter can saturate the dark matter relic density by the annihilation of dark matter into a pair of the SM particles or heavy resonances, in agreement with the diphoton resonance signal strength. Read More

We explore the possibility of explaining the recent $\sim 750$ GeV excesses observed by ATLAS and CMS in the $\gamma\gamma$ spectrum in the context of a compelling theory of Naturalness. The potential spin-zero resonance responsible for the excesses also requires the existence of new heavy charged states. We show that both such features are naturally realized in a see-saw Composite Higgs model for EWSB, where the new pseudo-Goldstone bosons are expected to be comparatively heavier than the SM Higgs, and the new fermions have masses in the TeV range. Read More

We consider interpretations of the recent $\sim 3 \sigma$ reports by the CMS and ATLAS collaborations of a possible $X(\sim 750~{\rm GeV})$ state decaying into $\gamma \gamma$ final states. We focus on the possibilities that this is a scalar or pseudoscalar electroweak isoscalar state produced by gluon-gluon fusion mediated by loops of heavy fermions. We consider several models for these fermions, including a single vector-like charge $2/3$ T quark, a doublet of vector-like quarks $(T, B)$, and a vector-like generation of quarks, with or without leptons that also contribute to the $X \to \gamma \gamma$ decay amplitude. Read More

We examine the `diboson' excess at $\sim 2$ TeV seen by the LHC experiments in various channels. We provide a comparison of the excess significances as a function of the mass of the tentative resonance and give the signal cross sections needed to explain the excesses. We also present a survey of available theoretical explanations of the resonance, classified in three main approaches. Read More

We present predictions for the associated production of a Higgs boson at NLO+PS accuracy, including the effect of anomalous interactions between the Higgs and gauge bosons. We present our results in different frameworks, one in which the interaction vertex between the Higgs boson and Standard Model $W$ and $Z$ bosons is parameterized in terms of general Lorentz structures, and one in which Electroweak symmetry breaking is manifestly linear and the resulting operators arise through a six-dimensional effective field theory framework. We present analytic calculations of the Standard Model and Beyond the Standard Model contributions, and discuss the phenomenological impact of the higher order pieces. Read More

The Higgs portal to scalar Dark Matter is considered in the context of non-linearly realised electroweak symmetry breaking. We determine the dominant interactions of gauge bosons and the physical Higgs particle $h$ to a scalar singlet dark matter candidate. Phenomenological consequences are also studied in detail, including the possibility of distinguishing this scenario from the standard Higgs portal in which the electroweak symmetry breaking is linearly realised. Read More

Simple Composite Higgs models predict new vector-like fermions not too far from the electroweak scale, yet LHC limits are now sensitive to the TeV scale. Motivated by this tension, we explore the holographic dual of the minimal model, MCHM5, to understand how far naive 4D predictions are from their 5D duals. Interestingly, we find that the usual hierarchy among the vector-like quarks is not generic, hence ameliorating the tuning issue. Read More

Understanding the extent to which experimental searches are sensitive to Light Stops (LST) scenarios is essential to resolve questions about naturalness, electroweak baryogenesis and Dark Matter. In this paper we characterize the reach on LST scenarios in two ways. We extend experimental searches to cover specific gaps in the LST parameter space, showing for the first time that assuming a single decay channel one can exclude the region of $m_{\tilde{t}}Read More

Natural SUSY scenarios with a low value of the $\mu$ parameter, are characterised by a higgsino-like dark matter candidate, and a compressed spectrum for the lightest higgsinos. We explore the prospects for probing this scenario at the 13 TeV stage of the LHC via monojet searches, with various integrated luminosity options, and demonstrate how these results are affect by different assumptions on the achievable level of control on the experimental systematic uncertainties. The complementarity between collider and direct detection experiments (present and future) is also highlighted. Read More

We introduce a new class of Composite Higgs models in which electroweak symmetry is broken by a seesaw-like mechanism. If a global symmetry is broken sequentially at different scales, two sets of pseudo-Goldstone bosons will arise, one set being typically heavier than the other. If two Composite Higgs doublets mix, then the mass-squared of the lighter state can be driven negative, and induce EWSB. Read More

We introduce Rosetta, a program allowing for the translation between different bases of effective field theory operators. We present the main functions of the program and provide an example of usage. One of the Lagrangians which Rosetta can translate into has been implemented into FeynRules, which allows Rosetta to be interfaced into various high-energy physics programs such as Monte Carlo event generators. Read More

The flatness of the inflaton potential and lightness of the Higgs could have the common origin of the breaking of a global symmetry. This scenario provides a unified framework of Goldstone Inflation and Composite Higgs, where the inflaton and the Higgs both have a pseudo--Goldstone boson nature. The inflaton reheats the Universe via decays to the Higgs and subsequent secondary production of other SM particles via the top and massive vector bosons. Read More

In this paper we explore the possibility that recent results by ATLAS and CMS searching for heavy resonances decaying into bosons could be a first hint of a new sector of pure-gauge confining physics, possibly linked to the origin of the Higgs as a Composite Higgs. The lightest resonances (glueballs) of this new sector would be neutral, spin-zero and -two, and their behaviour would resemble that of a radion and a massive graviton of extra-dimensions. We outline how LHC8 data could be used to improve sensitivity on this scenario, as well as future characterization during the LHC13 run. Read More

We have explored Natural Supersymmetry (NSUSY) scenarios with low values of the $\mu$ parameter which are characterised by higgsino-like Dark Matter (DM) and compressed spectra for the lightest MSSM particles, $\chi^0_1$, $\chi^0_2$ and $\chi^\pm_1$. This scenario could be probed via monojet signatures, but as the signal-to-background ratio (S/B) is low we demonstrate that the 8 TeV LHC cannot obtain limits on the DM mass beyond those of LEP2. On the other hand, we have found, for the 13 TeV run of the LHC, that by optimising kinematical cuts we can bring the S/B ratio up to the 5(3)% level which would allow the exclusion of the DM mass up to 200(250) GeV respectively, significantly extending LEP2 limits. Read More

Identifying the inflaton with a pseudo-Goldstone boson explains the flatness of its potential. Successful Goldstone Inflation should also be robust against UV corrections, such as from quantum gravity: in the language of the effective field theory this implies that all scales are sub-Planckian. In this paper we present scenarios which realise both requirements by examining the structure of Goldstone potentials arising from Coleman-Weinberg contributions. Read More

Precise measurements of SM particles properties at the LHC allows to look for heavy New Physics in the context of an Effective Field Theory (EFT). These searches, however, often rely on kinematic regions where the validity of the EFT may be compromised. In this paper we propose to address this issue by comparing with benchmark models. Read More

Slow-roll inflation requires the inflaton field to have an exceptionally flat potential, which combined with measurements of the scale of inflation demands some degree of fine-tuning. Alternatively, the flatness of the potential could be due to the inflaton's origin as a pseudo-Goldstone boson, as in Natural Inflation. Alas, consistency with Planck data places the original proposal of Natural Inflation in a tight spot, as it requires a trans-Planckian excursion of the inflaton. Read More

We treat the Standard Model as the low-energy limit of an effective field theory that incorporates higher-dimensional operators to capture the effects of decoupled new physics. We consider the constraints imposed on the coefficients of dimension-6 operators by electroweak precision tests (EWPTs), applying a framework for the effects of dimension-6 operators on electroweak precision tests that is more general than the standard $S,T$ formalism, and use measurements of Higgs couplings and the kinematics of associated Higgs production at the Tevatron and LHC, as well as triple-gauge couplings at the LHC. We highlight the complementarity between EWPTs, Tevatron and LHC measurements in obtaining model-independent limits on the effective Standard Model after LHC Run~1. Read More

New pseudo-scalars, often called axion-like particles (ALPs), abound in model-building and are often associated with the breaking of a new symmetry. Traditional searches and indirect bounds are limited to light axions, typically in or below the KeV range for ALPs coupled to photons. We present collider bounds on ALPs from mono-$\gamma$, tri-$\gamma$ and mono-jet searches in a model independent fashion, as well as the prospects for the LHC and future machines. Read More

A sizeable tensor-to-scalar ratio, such as recently claimed by BICEP2, would imply a scale of inflation at the typical scale of supersymmetric grand unification. This could be an accident, or strong support for supersymmetric theories. Models of F-term hybrid inflation naturally connect the GUT scale with the inflationary scale, but they also predict the tensor-to-scalar ratio to be unmeasurably small. Read More

We present the activities of the "New Physics" working group for the "Physics at TeV Colliders" workshop (Les Houches, France, 3--21 June, 2013). Our report includes new computational tool developments, studies of the implications of the Higgs boson discovery on new physics, important signatures for searches for natural new physics at the LHC, new studies of flavour aspects of new physics, and assessments of the interplay between direct dark matter searches and the LHC. Read More

Constraints on the full set of Standard Model dimension-6 operators have previously used triple-gauge couplings to complement the constraints obtainable from Higgs signal strengths. Here we extend previous analyses of the Higgs sector constraints by including information from the associated production of Higgs and massive vector bosons (H+V production), which excludes a direction of limited sensitivity allowed by partial cancellations in the triple-gauge sector measured at LEP. Kinematic distributions in H+V production provide improved sensitivity to dimension-6 operators, as we illustrate here with simulations of the invariant mass and $p_T$ distributions measured by D0 and ATLAS, respectively. Read More

The discovery of B-modes, and their effect on the fit to inflationary parameters, opens a window to explore quantum gravity. In this paper we adopt an effective theory approach to study quantum gravity effects in inflation. We apply this approach to chaotic and $\phi^4$ inflation, and find that BICEP2 constrains these new operators to values which are consistent with the effective theory approach. Read More

We consider the astrophysical bounds on a new form of dark matter, the so called Gravity-mediated Dark Matter. In this scenario, dark matter communicates with us through a mediator sector composed of gravitational resonances, namely a new scalar (radion) and a massive spin-two resonance (massive graviton). We consider specific models motivated by natural electroweak symmetry breaking or weak-scale dark matter in the context of models in warped extra-dimensions and their composite duals. Read More

2013Oct

This report summarizes the work of the Energy Frontier Higgs Boson working group of the 2013 Community Summer Study (Snowmass). We identify the key elements of a precision Higgs physics program and document the physics potential of future experimental facilities as elucidated during the Snowmass study. We study Higgs couplings to gauge boson and fermion pairs, double Higgs production for the Higgs self-coupling, its quantum numbers and $CP$-mixing in Higgs couplings, the Higgs mass and total width, and prospects for direct searches for additional Higgs bosons in extensions of the Standard Model. Read More

The Higgs discovery and the lack of any other hint for new physics favor a description of non-standard Higgs physics in terms of an effective field theory. We present an implementation of a general Higgs effective Lagrangian containing operators up to dimension six in the framework of FeynRules and provide details on the translation between the mass and interaction bases, in particular for three- and four-point interaction vertices involving Higgs and gauge bosons. We illustrate the strengths of this implementation by using the UFO interface of FeynRules capable to generate model files that can be understood by the MadGraph 5 event generator and that have the specificity to contain all interaction vertices, without any restriction on the number of external legs or on the complexity of the Lorentz structures. Read More

2013Aug
Authors: M. Bicer, H. Duran Yildiz, I. Yildiz, G. Coignet, M. Delmastro, T. Alexopoulos, C. Grojean, S. Antusch, T. Sen, H. -J. He, K. Potamianos, S. Haug, A. Moreno, A. Heister, V. Sanz, G. Gomez-Ceballos, M. Klute, M. Zanetti, L. -T. Wang, M. Dam, C. Boehm, N. Glover, F. Krauss, A. Lenz, M. Syphers, C. Leonidopoulos, V. Ciulli, P. Lenzi, G. Sguazzoni, M. Antonelli, M. Boscolo, U. Dosselli, O. Frasciello, C. Milardi, G. Venanzoni, M. Zobov, J. van der Bij, M. de Gruttola, D. -W. Kim, M. Bachtis, A. Butterworth, C. Bernet, C. Botta, F. Carminati, A. David, D. d'Enterria, L. Deniau, G. Ganis, B. Goddard, G. Giudice, P. Janot, J. M. Jowett, C. Lourenco, L. Malgeri, E. Meschi, F. Moortgat, P. Musella, J. A. Osborne, L. Perrozzi, M. Pierini, L. Rinolfi, A. de Roeck, J. Rojo, G. Roy, A. Sciaba, A. Valassi, C. S. Waaijer, J. Wenninger, H. Woehri, F. Zimmermann, A. Blondel, M. Koratzinos, P. Mermod, Y. Onel, R. Talman, E. Castaneda Miranda, E. Bulyak, D. Porsuk, D. Kovalskyi, S. Padhi, P. Faccioli, J. R. Ellis, M. Campanelli, Y. Bai, M. Chamizo, R. B. Appleby, H. Owen, H. Maury Cuna, C. Gracios, G. A. Munoz-Hernandez, L. Trentadue, E. Torrente-Lujan, S. Wang, D. Bertsche, A. Gramolin, V. Telnov, M. Kado, P. Petroff, P. Azzi, O. Nicrosini, F. Piccinini, G. Montagna, F. Kapusta, S. Laplace, W. da Silva, N. Gizani, N. Craig, T. Han, C. Luci, B. Mele, L. Silvestrini, M. Ciuchini, R. Cakir, R. Aleksan, F. Couderc, S. Ganjour, E. Lancon, E. Locci, P. Schwemling, M. Spiro, C. Tanguy, J. Zinn-Justin, S. Moretti, M. Kikuchi, H. Koiso, K. Ohmi, K. Oide, G. Pauletta, R. Ruiz de Austri, M. Gouzevitch, S. Chattopadhyay

The discovery by the ATLAS and CMS experiments of a new boson with mass around 125 GeV and with measured properties compatible with those of a Standard-Model Higgs boson, coupled with the absence of discoveries of phenomena beyond the Standard Model at the TeV scale, has triggered interest in ideas for future Higgs factories. A new circular e+e- collider hosted in a 80 to 100 km tunnel, TLEP, is among the most attractive solutions proposed so far. It has a clean experimental environment, produces high luminosity for top-quark, Higgs boson, W and Z studies, accommodates multiple detectors, and can reach energies up to the t-tbar threshold and beyond. Read More

Fermionic top-partners arise in models such as Composite Higgs and Little Higgs. They modify Higgs properties, in particular how the Higgs couples to top quarks. Alas, there is a low-energy cancellation acting in the coupling of the Higgs boson to gluons and photons. Read More

We put forth conclusions and suggestions regarding the presentation of the LHC Higgs results that may help to maximize their impact and their utility to the whole High Energy Physics community. Read More

Dark matter could have an electroweak origin, yet communicate with the visible sector exclusively through gravitational interactions. In a set-up addressing the hierarchy problem, we propose a new dark matter scenario where gravitational mediators, arising from the compactification of extra-dimensions, are responsible for dark matter interactions and its relic abundance in the Universe. We write an explicit example of this mechanism in warped extra-dimensions and work out its constraints. Read More

Right-handed light quarks could be significantly composite, yet compatible with experimental searches at the LHC and precision tests on Standard Model couplings. In these scenarios, that are motivated by flavor physics, one expects large cross sections for the production of new resonances coupled to light quarks. We study experimental strong signatures of right-handed compositeness at the LHC, and constrain the parameter space of these models with recent results by ATLAS and CMS. Read More

We study resonant pair production of heavy particles in fully hadronic final states by means of jet substructure techniques. We propose a new resonance tagging strategy that smoothly interpolates between the highly boosted and fully resolved regimes, leading to uniform signal efficiencies and background rejection rates across a broad range of masses. Our method makes it possible to efficiently replace independent experimental searches, based on different final state topologies, with a single common analysis. Read More

There is still no proof that the new particle $X$ recently discovered by the ATLAS and CMS Collaborations indeed has spin zero and positive parity, as confidently expected. We show here that the energy dependence of associated $W/Z + X$ production would be much less for a $J^P = 0^+$ boson with minimal couplings, such as the Higgs boson of the Standard Model, than for a spin-two particle with graviton-like couplings or a spin-zero boson with non-minimal couplings. The $W/Z + (X \to {\bar b}b)$ signal apparently observed by the CDF and D0 Collaborations can be used to predict the cross section for the same signal at the LHC that should be measured under the spin-two and different spin-zero hypotheses. Read More

We explore the interplay between lines in the gamma-ray spectrum and LHC searches involving missing energy and photons. As an example, we consider a singlet Dirac fermion dark matter with the mediator for Fermi gamma-ray line at 130 GeV. A new chiral or local U(1) symmetry makes weak-scale dark matter natural and provides the axion or Z' gauge boson as the mediator connecting between dark matter and electroweak gauge bosons. Read More

The new particle X recently discovered by the ATLAS and CMS Collaborations is widely expected to have spin zero, but this remains to be determined. The leading alternative is that X has spin two, presumably with graviton-like couplings. We show that measurements of the X particle to pairs of vector bosons constrain such scenarios. Read More