T. J. Corona

T. J. Corona
Are you T. J. Corona?

Claim your profile, edit publications, add additional information:

Contact Details

Name
T. J. Corona
Affiliation
Location

Pubs By Year

Pub Categories

 
Physics - Instrumentation and Detectors (4)
 
Physics - Computational Physics (3)
 
Nuclear Experiment (3)
 
High Energy Physics - Experiment (2)
 
Mathematics - Numerical Analysis (1)

Publications Authored By T. J. Corona

The Kassiopeia particle tracking framework is an object-oriented software package using modern C++ techniques, written originally to meet the needs of the KATRIN collaboration. Kassiopeia features a new algorithmic paradigm for particle tracking simulations which targets experiments containing complex geometries and electromagnetic fields, with high priority put on calculation efficiency, customizability, extensibility, and ease of use for novice programmers. To solve Kassiopeia's target physics problem the software is capable of simulating particle trajectories governed by arbitrarily complex differential equations of motion, continuous physics processes that may in part be modeled as terms perturbing that equation of motion, stochastic processes that occur in flight such as bulk scattering and decay, and stochastic surface processes occuring at interfaces, including transmission and reflection effects. Read More

2016Mar
Authors: M. Arenz, M. Babutzka, M. Bahr, J. P. Barrett, S. Bauer, M. Beck, A. Beglarian, J. Behrens, T. Bergmann, U. Besserer, J. Blümer, L. I. Bodine, K. Bokeloh, J. Bonn, B. Bornschein, L. Bornschein, S. Büsch, T. H. Burritt, S. Chilingaryan, T. J. Corona, L. De Viveiros, P. J. Doe, O. Dragoun, G. Drexlin, S. Dyba, S. Ebenhöch, K. Eitel, E. Ellinger, S. Enomoto, M. Erhard, D. Eversheim, M. Fedkevych, A. Felden, S. Fischer, J. A. Formaggio, F. Fränkle, D. Furse, M. Ghilea, W. Gil, F. Glück, A. Gonzalez Urena, S. Görhardt, S. Groh, S. Grohmann, R. Grössle, R. Gumbsheimer, M. Hackenjos, V. Hannen, F. Harms, N. Hauÿmann, F. Heizmann, K. Helbing, W. Herz, S. Hickford, D. Hilk, B. Hillen, T. Höhn, B. Holzapfel, M. Hötzel, M. A. Howe, A. Huber, A. Jansen, N. Kernert, L. Kippenbrock, M. Kleesiek, M. Klein, A. Kopmann, A. Kosmider, A. Kovalík, B. Krasch, M. Kraus, H. Krause, M. Krause, L. Kuckert, B. Kuffner, L. La Cascio, O. Lebeda, B. Leiber, J. Letnev, V. M. Lobashev, A. Lokhov, E. Malcherek, M. Mark, E. L. Martin, S. Mertens, S. Mirz, B. Monreal, K. Müller, M. Neuberger, H. Neumann, S. Niemes, M. Noe, N. S. Oblath, A. Off, H. -W. Ortjohann, A. Osipowicz, E. Otten, D. S. Parno, P. Plischke, A. W. P. Poon, M. Prall, F. Priester, P. C. -O. Ranitzsch, J. Reich, O. Rest, R. G. H. Robertson, M. Röllig, S. Rosendahl, S. Rupp, M. Rysavy, K. Schlösser, M. Schlösser, K. Schönung, M. Schrank, J. Schwarz, W. Seiler, H. Seitz-Moskaliuk, J. Sentkerestiova, A. Skasyrskaya, M. Slezak, A. Spalek, M. Steidl, N. Steinbrink, M. Sturm, M. Suesser, H. H. Telle, T. Thümmler, N. Titov, I. Tkachev, N. Trost, A. Unru, K. Valerius, D. Venos, R. Vianden, S. Vöcking, B. L. Wall, N. Wandkowsky, M. Weber, C. Weinheimer, C. Weiss, S. Welte, J. Wendel, K. L. Wierman, J. F. Wilkerson, D. Winzen, J. Wolf, S. Wüstling, M. Zacher, S. Zadoroghny, M. Zboril

The KATRIN experiment will probe the neutrino mass by measuring the beta-electron energy spectrum near the endpoint of tritium beta-decay. An integral energy analysis will be performed by an electro-static spectrometer (Main Spectrometer), an ultra-high vacuum vessel with a length of 23.2 m, a volume of 1240 m^3, and a complex inner electrode system with about 120000 individual parts. Read More

The focal-plane detector system for the KArlsruhe TRItium Neutrino (KATRIN) experiment consists of a multi-pixel silicon p-i-n-diode array, custom readout electronics, two superconducting solenoid magnets, an ultra high-vacuum system, a high-vacuum system, calibration and monitoring devices, a scintillating veto, and a custom data-acquisition system. It is designed to detect the low-energy electrons selected by the KATRIN main spectrometer. We describe the system and summarize its performance after its final installation. Read More

We describe a technique to analytically compute the multipole moments of a charge distribution confined to a planar triangle, which may be useful in solving the Laplace equation using the fast multipole boundary element method (FMBEM) and for charged particle tracking. This algorithm proceeds by performing the necessary integration recursively within a specific coordinate system, and then transforming the moments into the global coordinate system through the application of rotation and translation operators. This method has been implemented and found use in conjunction with a simple piecewise constant collocation scheme, but is generalizable to non-uniform charge densities. Read More

Semiconductor detectors in general have a dead layer at their surfaces that is either a result of natural or induced passivation, or is formed during the process of making a contact. Charged particles passing through this region produce ionization that is incompletely collected and recorded, which leads to departures from the ideal in both energy deposition and resolution. The silicon \textit{p-i-n} diode used in the KATRIN neutrino-mass experiment has such a dead layer. Read More

We present a novel technique by which highly-segmented electrostatic configurations can be solved. The Robin Hood method is a matrix-inversion algorithm optimized for solving high density boundary element method (BEM) problems. We illustrate the capabilities of this solver by studying two distinct geometry scales: (a) the electrostatic potential of a large volume beta-detector and (b) the field enhancement present at surface of electrode nano-structures. Read More