T. Han - University of Pittsburgh

T. Han
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Name
T. Han
Affiliation
University of Pittsburgh
City
Pittsburgh
Country
United States

Pubs By Year

Pub Categories

 
High Energy Physics - Phenomenology (13)
 
Physics - Mesoscopic Systems and Quantum Hall Effect (10)
 
Computer Science - Networking and Internet Architecture (9)
 
Mathematics - Information Theory (8)
 
Computer Science - Information Theory (8)
 
High Energy Physics - Experiment (8)
 
Physics - Strongly Correlated Electrons (5)
 
Computer Science - Computer Vision and Pattern Recognition (5)
 
Physics - Materials Science (3)
 
Physics - Superconductivity (2)
 
Computer Science - Human-Computer Interaction (2)
 
Cosmology and Nongalactic Astrophysics (1)
 
Physics - Statistical Mechanics (1)
 
High Energy Physics - Lattice (1)
 
Computer Science - Computation and Language (1)
 
Physics - Computational Physics (1)
 
Statistics - Machine Learning (1)
 
Computer Science - Logic in Computer Science (1)
 
High Energy Astrophysical Phenomena (1)
 
Computer Science - Robotics (1)
 
Computer Science - Learning (1)
 
Computer Science - Neural and Evolutionary Computing (1)

Publications Authored By T. Han

We investigate the feasibility of the indirect detection of dark matter in a simple model using the neutrino portal. The model is very economical, with right-handed neutrinos generating neutrino masses through the Type-I seesaw mechanism and simultaneously mediating interactions with dark matter. Given the small neutrino Yukawa couplings expected in a Type-I seesaw, direct detection and accelerator probes of dark matter in this scenario are challenging. Read More

There have been numerous studies on the problem of flocking control for multiagent systems whose simplified models are presented in terms of point-mass elements. Meanwhile, full dynamic models pose some challenging problems in addressing the flocking control problem of mobile robots due to their nonholonomic dynamic properties. Taking practical constraints into consideration, we propose a novel approach to distributed flocking control of nonholonomic mobile robots by bounded feedback. Read More

We use inelastic light scattering to study Sr$_{1-x}$Na$_x$Fe$_2$As$_2$ ($x\approx0.34$), which exhibits a robust tetragonal magnetic phase that restores the four-fold rotation symmetry inside the orthorhombic magnetic phase. With cooling, we observe splitting and recombination of an $E_g$ phonon peak upon entering the orthorhombic and tetragonal magnetic phases, respectively, consistent with the reentrant phase behavior. Read More

We revisit the radiative decays of the Higgs boson to a fermion pair $h\rightarrow f\bar{f}\gamma$ where $f$ denotes a fermion in the Standard Model (SM). We include the chirality-flipping diagrams via the Yukawa couplings at the order $\mathcal{O}(y_f^2 \alpha)$, the chirality-conserving contributions via the top-quark loops of the order $\mathcal{O}(y_t^2 \alpha^3)$, and the electroweak loops at the order $\mathcal{O}(\alpha^4)$. The QED correction is about $Q_f^2\times {\cal O}(1\%)$ and contributes to the running of fermion masses at a similar level, which should be taken into account for future precision Higgs physics. Read More

The first- and second-order optimum achievable exponents in the simple hypothesis testing problem are investigated. The optimum achievable exponent for type II error probability, under the constraint that the type I error probability is allowed asymptotically up to epsilon, is called the epsilon-optimum exponent. In this paper, we first give the second-order epsilon-exponent in the case where the null hypothesis and the alternative hypothesis are a mixed memoryless source and a stationary memoryless source, respectively. Read More

Few-layer black phosphorus possesses unique electronic properties giving rise to distinct quantum phenomena and thus offers a fertile platform to explore the emergent correlation phenomena in low dimensions. A great progress has been demonstrated in improving the quality of hole-doped few-layer black phosphorus and its quantum transport studies, whereas the same achievements are rather modest for electron-doped few-layer black phosphorus. Here, we report the ambipolar quantum transport in few-layer black phosphorus exhibiting undoubtedly the quantum Hall effect for hole transport and showing clear signatures of the quantum Hall effect for electron transport. Read More

Based on the distinguishing features of multi-tier millimeter wave (mmWave) networks such as different transmit powers, different directivity gains from directional beamforming alignment and path loss laws for line-of-sight (LOS) and non-line-of-sight (NLOS) links, we introduce a normalization model to simplify the analysis of multi-tier mmWave cellular networks. The highlight of the model is that we convert a multi-tier mmWave cellular network into a single-tier mmWave network, where all the base stations (BSs) have the same normalized transmit power 1 and the densities of BSs scaled by LOS or NLOS scaling factors respectively follow piecewise constant function which has multiple demarcation points. On this basis, expressions for computing the coverage probability are obtained in general case with beamforming alignment errors and the special case with perfect beamforming alignment in the communication. Read More

The observation of topological semimetal state in a material with a magnetic ground state is quite rare. By combination of high-field magnetoresistance and Shubnikov-de Hass oscillation analyses, we find that NdSb, which has an antiferromagnetic transition at 15 K, exhibits a Dirac-like topological semimetal state at the Brillouin zone corner (X points). The existence of topological semimetal state is well supported by our band-structure calculations. Read More

Atomically thin black phosphorus (BP) field-effect transistors show strong-weak localization transition which is tunable through gate voltages. Hopping transports through charge impurity induced localized states are measured at low-carrier density regime. Variable-range hopping model is applied to simulate the charge carrier scattering behavior. Read More

We introduce the problem of variable-length source resolvability, where a given target probability distribution is approximated by encoding a variable-length uniform random number, and the asymptotically minimum average length rate of the uniform random numbers, called the (variable-length) resolvability, is investigated. We first analyze the variable-length resolvability with the variational distance as an approximation measure. Next, we investigate the case under the divergence as an approximation measure. Read More

Behaviour distances to measure the resemblance of two states in a (nondeterministic) fuzzy transition system have been proposed recently in the literature. Such a distance, defined as a pseudo-ultrametric over the state space of the model, provides a quantitative analogue of bisimilarity. In this paper, we focus on the problem of computing these distances. Read More

We fabricate high-mobility p-type few-layer WSe2 field-effect transistors and surprisingly observe a series of quantum Hall (QH) states following an unconventional sequence predominated by odd-integer states under a moderate strength magnetic field. By tilting the magnetic field, we discover Landau level (LL) crossing effects at ultra-low coincident angles, revealing that the Zeeman energy is about three times as large as the cyclotron energy near the valence band top at {\Gamma} valley. This result implies the significant roles played by the exchange interactions in p-type few-layer WSe2, in which itinerant or QH ferromagnetism likely occurs. Read More

In this paper, we focus on one of the representative 5G network scenarios, namely multi-tier heterogeneous cellular networks. User association is investigated in order to reduce the down-link co-channel interference. Firstly, in order to analyze the multi-tier heterogeneous cellular networks where the base stations in different tiers usually adopt different transmission powers, we propose a Transmission Power Normalization Model (TPNM), which is able to convert a multi-tier cellular network into a single-tier network, such that all base stations have the same normalized transmission power. Read More

The dark matter (DM) blind spots in the Minimal Supersymmetric Standard Model (MSSM) refer to the parameter regions where the couplings of the DM particles to the $Z$-boson or the Higgs boson are almost zero, leading to vanishingly small signals for the DM direct detections. In this paper, we carry out comprehensive analyses for the DM searches under the blind-spot scenarios in MSSM. Guided by the requirement of acceptable DM relic abundance, we explore the complementary coverage for the theory parameters at the LHC, the projection for the future underground DM direct searches, and the indirect searches from the relic DM annihilation into photons and neutrinos. Read More

Image CAPTCHA, aiming at effectively distinguishing human users from malicious script attacks, has been an important mechanism to protect online systems from spams and abuses. Despite the increasing interests in developing and deploying image CAPTCHAs, the usability aspect of those CAPTCHAs has hardly been explored systematically. In this paper, the universal design factors of image CAPTCHAs, such as image layouts, quantities, sizes, tilting angles and colors were experimentally evaluated through the following four dimensions: eye-tracking, efficiency, effectiveness and satisfaction. Read More

Text CAPTCHA has been an effective means to protect online systems from spams and abuses caused by automatic scripts which pretend to be human beings. However, nearly all the Text CAPTCHA designs in nowadays are based on English characters, which may not be the most user-friendly option for non-English speakers. Therefore, under the background of globalization, there is an increasing interest in designing local-language CAPTCHA, which is expected to be more usable for native speakers. Read More

We study the prospects of measuring the CP property of the Higgs ($h$) coupling to tau leptons using the vector boson fusion (VBF) production mode at the high-luminosity LHC. Utilizing the previously proposed angle between the planes spanned by the momentum vectors of the $(\pi^+\pi^0)$ and $(\pi^- \pi^0)$ pairs originating in $\tau^\pm$ decays as the CP-odd observable, we perform a detailed Monte Carlo analysis, taking into account the relevant standard model backgrounds, as well as detector resolution effects. We find that excluding a pure CP-odd coupling hypothesis requires $\mathcal{O}(400 {~\rm fb}^{-1})$ luminosity at the 14 TeV LHC, and values of the CP-mixing angle larger than about $25^\circ$ can be excluded at $95\%$ confidence level using $3 {~\rm ab}^{-1}$ data. Read More

We study the Higgs boson $(h)$ decay to two light jets at the 14 TeV High-Luminosity-LHC (HL-LHC), where a light jet ($j$) represents any non-flavor tagged jet from the observational point of view. The decay mode $h\to gg$ is chosen as the benchmark since it is the dominant channel in the Standard Model (SM), but the bound obtained is also applicable to the light quarks $(j=u,d,s)$. We estimate the achievable bounds on the decay branching fractions through the associated production $Vh\ (V=W^\pm,Z)$. Read More

We derive the electroweak (EW) collinear splitting functions for the Standard Model, including the massive fermions, gauge bosons and the Higgs boson. We first present the splitting functions in the limit of unbroken SU(2)xU(1) and discuss their general features in the collinear and soft-collinear regimes. We then systematically incorporate EW symmetry breaking (EWSB), which leads to the emergence of additional "ultra-collinear" splitting phenomena and naive violations of the Goldstone-boson Equivalence Theorem. Read More

2016Oct
Authors: D. de Florian1, C. Grojean2, F. Maltoni3, C. Mariotti4, A. Nikitenko5, M. Pieri6, P. Savard7, M. Schumacher8, R. Tanaka9, R. Aggleton10, M. Ahmad11, B. Allanach12, C. Anastasiou13, W. Astill14, S. Badger15, M. Badziak16, J. Baglio17, E. Bagnaschi18, A. Ballestrero19, A. Banfi20, D. Barducci21, M. Beckingham22, C. Becot23, G. Bélanger24, J. Bellm25, N. Belyaev26, F. U. Bernlochner27, C. Beskidt28, A. Biekötter29, F. Bishara30, W. Bizon31, N. E. Bomark32, M. Bonvini33, S. Borowka34, V. Bortolotto35, S. Boselli36, F. J. Botella37, R. Boughezal38, G. C. Branco39, J. Brehmer40, L. Brenner41, S. Bressler42, I. Brivio43, A. Broggio44, H. Brun45, G. Buchalla46, C. D. Burgard47, A. Calandri48, L. Caminada49, R. Caminal Armadans50, F. Campanario51, J. Campbell52, F. Caola53, C. M. Carloni Calame54, S. Carrazza55, A. Carvalho56, M. Casolino57, O. Cata58, A. Celis59, F. Cerutti60, N. Chanon61, M. Chen62, X. Chen63, B. Chokoufé Nejad64, N. Christensen65, M. Ciuchini66, R. Contino67, T. Corbett68, R. Costa69, D. Curtin70, M. Dall'Osso71, A. David72, S. Dawson73, J. de Blas74, W. de Boer75, P. de Castro Manzano76, C. Degrande77, R. L. Delgado78, F. Demartin79, A. Denner80, B. Di Micco81, R. Di Nardo82, S. Dittmaier83, A. Dobado84, T. Dorigo85, F. A. Dreyer86, M. Dührssen87, C. Duhr88, F. Dulat89, K. Ecker90, K. Ellis91, U. Ellwanger92, C. Englert93, D. Espriu94, A. Falkowski95, L. Fayard96, R. Feger97, G. Ferrera98, A. Ferroglia99, N. Fidanza100, T. Figy101, M. Flechl102, D. Fontes103, S. Forte104, P. Francavilla105, E. Franco106, R. Frederix107, A. Freitas108, F. F. Freitas109, F. Frensch110, S. Frixione111, B. Fuks112, E. Furlan113, S. Gadatsch114, J. Gao115, Y. Gao116, M. V. Garzelli117, T. Gehrmann118, R. Gerosa119, M. Ghezzi120, D. Ghosh121, S. Gieseke122, D. Gillberg123, G. F. Giudice124, E. W. N. Glover125, F. Goertz126, D. Gonçalves127, J. Gonzalez-Fraile128, M. Gorbahn129, S. Gori130, C. A. Gottardo131, M. Gouzevitch132, P. Govoni133, D. Gray134, M. Grazzini135, N. Greiner136, A. Greljo137, J. Grigo138, A. V. Gritsan139, R. Gröber140, S. Guindon141, H. E. Haber142, C. Han143, T. Han144, R. Harlander145, M. A. Harrendorf146, H. B. Hartanto147, C. Hays148, S. Heinemeyer149, G. Heinrich150, M. Herrero151, F. Herzog152, B. Hespel153, V. Hirschi154, S. Hoeche155, S. Honeywell156, S. J. Huber157, C. Hugonie158, J. Huston159, A. Ilnicka160, G. Isidori161, B. Jäger162, M. Jaquier163, S. P. Jones164, A. Juste165, S. Kallweit166, A. Kaluza167, A. Kardos168, A. Karlberg169, Z. Kassabov170, N. Kauer171, D. I. Kazakov172, M. Kerner173, W. Kilian174, F. Kling175, K. Köneke176, R. Kogler177, R. Konoplich178, S. Kortner179, S. Kraml180, C. Krause181, F. Krauss182, M. Krawczyk183, A. Kulesza184, S. Kuttimalai185, R. Lane186, A. Lazopoulos187, G. Lee188, P. Lenzi189, I. M. Lewis190, Y. Li191, S. Liebler192, J. Lindert193, X. Liu194, Z. Liu195, F. J. Llanes-Estrada196, H. E. Logan197, D. Lopez-Val198, I. Low199, G. Luisoni200, P. Maierhöfer201, E. Maina202, B. Mansoulié203, H. Mantler204, M. Mantoani205, A. C. Marini206, V. I. Martinez Outschoorn207, S. Marzani208, D. Marzocca209, A. Massironi210, K. Mawatari211, J. Mazzitelli212, A. McCarn213, B. Mellado214, K. Melnikov215, S. B. Menari216, L. Merlo217, C. Meyer218, P. Milenovic219, K. Mimasu220, S. Mishima221, B. Mistlberger222, S. -O. Moch223, A. Mohammadi224, P. F. Monni225, G. Montagna226, M. Moreno Llácer227, N. Moretti228, S. Moretti229, L. Motyka230, A. Mück231, M. Mühlleitner232, S. Munir233, P. Musella234, P. Nadolsky235, D. Napoletano236, M. Nebot237, C. Neu238, M. Neubert239, R. Nevzorov240, O. Nicrosini241, J. Nielsen242, K. Nikolopoulos243, J. M. No244, C. O'Brien245, T. Ohl246, C. Oleari247, T. Orimoto248, D. Pagani249, C. E. Pandini250, A. Papaefstathiou251, A. S. Papanastasiou252, G. Passarino253, B. D. Pecjak254, M. Pelliccioni255, G. Perez256, L. Perrozzi257, F. Petriello258, G. Petrucciani259, E. Pianori260, F. Piccinini261, M. Pierini262, A. Pilkington263, S. Plätzer264, T. Plehn265, R. Podskubka266, C. T. Potter267, S. Pozzorini268, K. Prokofiev269, A. Pukhov270, I. Puljak271, M. Queitsch-Maitland272, J. Quevillon273, D. Rathlev274, M. Rauch275, E. Re276, M. N. Rebelo277, D. Rebuzzi278, L. Reina279, C. Reuschle280, J. Reuter281, M. Riembau282, F. Riva283, A. Rizzi284, T. Robens285, R. Röntsch286, J. Rojo287, J. C. Romão288, N. Rompotis289, J. Roskes290, R. Roth291, G. P. Salam292, R. Salerno293, M. O. P. Sampaio294, R. Santos295, V. Sanz296, J. J. Sanz-Cillero297, H. Sargsyan298, U. Sarica299, P. Schichtel300, J. Schlenk301, T. Schmidt302, C. Schmitt303, M. Schönherr304, U. Schubert305, M. Schulze306, S. Sekula307, M. Sekulla308, E. Shabalina309, H. S. Shao310, J. Shelton311, C. H. Shepherd-Themistocleous312, S. Y. Shim313, F. Siegert314, A. Signer315, J. P. Silva316, L. Silvestrini317, M. Sjodahl318, P. Slavich319, M. Slawinska320, L. Soffi321, M. Spannowsky322, C. Speckner323, D. M. Sperka324, M. Spira325, O. Stål326, F. Staub327, T. Stebel328, T. Stefaniak329, M. Steinhauser330, I. W. Stewart331, M. J. Strassler332, J. Streicher333, D. M. Strom334, S. Su335, X. Sun336, F. J. Tackmann337, K. Tackmann338, A. M. Teixeira339, R. Teixeira de Lima340, V. Theeuwes341, R. Thorne342, D. Tommasini343, P. Torrielli344, M. Tosi345, F. Tramontano346, Z. Trócsányi347, M. Trott348, I. Tsinikos349, M. Ubiali350, P. Vanlaer351, W. Verkerke352, A. Vicini353, L. Viliani354, E. Vryonidou355, D. Wackeroth356, C. E. M. Wagner357, J. Wang358, S. Wayand359, G. Weiglein360, C. Weiss361, M. Wiesemann362, C. Williams363, J. Winter364, D. Winterbottom365, R. Wolf366, M. Xiao367, L. L. Yang368, R. Yohay369, S. P. Y. Yuen370, G. Zanderighi371, M. Zaro372, D. Zeppenfeld373, R. Ziegler374, T. Zirke375, J. Zupan376
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This Report summarizes the results of the activities of the LHC Higgs Cross Section Working Group in the period 2014-2016. The main goal of the working group was to present the state-of-the-art of Higgs physics at the LHC, integrating all new results that have appeared in the last few years. The first part compiles the most up-to-date predictions of Higgs boson production cross sections and decay branching ratios, parton distribution functions, and off-shell Higgs boson production and interference effects. Read More

We demonstrate that charge density wave (CDW) phase transition occurs on the surface of electronically doped multilayer graphene when the Fermi level approaches the M points (also known as van Hove singularities where the density of states diverge) in the Brillouin zone of graphene band structure. The occurrence of such CDW phase transitions are supported by both the electrical transport measurement and optical measurements in electrostatically doped multilayer graphene. The CDW transition is accompanied with the sudden change of graphene channel resistance at T$_m$= 100K, as well as the splitting of Raman G peak (1580 cm$^{-1}$). Read More

Convolutional Neural Networks (CNN) have demon- strated its successful applications in computer vision, speech recognition, and natural language processing. For object recog- nition, CNNs might be limited by its strict label requirement and an implicit assumption that images are supposed to be target- object-dominated for optimal solutions. However, the labeling procedure, necessitating laying out the locations of target ob- jects, is very tedious, making high-quality large-scale dataset prohibitively expensive. Read More

Ubiquitous information service converged by different types of heterogeneous networks is one of fundamental functions for smart cities. Considering the deployment of 5G ultra-dense wireless networks, the 5G converged cell-less communication networks are proposed to support mobile terminals in smart cities. To break obstacles of heterogeneous wireless networks, the 5G converged cell-less communication network is vertically converged in different tiers of heterogeneous wireless networks and horizontally converged in celled architectures of base stations/access points. Read More

A residual-networks family with hundreds or even thousands of layers dominates major image recognition tasks, but building a network by simply stacking residual blocks inevitably limits its optimization ability. This paper proposes a novel residual-network architecture, Residual networks of Residual networks (RoR), to dig the optimization ability of residual networks. RoR substitutes optimizing residual mapping of residual mapping for optimizing original residual mapping. Read More

We report on temperature dependence of the infrared reflectivity spectra of a single crystalline herbertsmithite in two polarizations --- parallel and perpendicular to the kagome plane of Cu atoms. We observe anomalous broadening of the low frequency phonons possibly caused by fluctuations in the exotic dynamical magnetic order of the spin liquid. Read More

We study the effects of the initial state radiation on the $s$-channel Higgs boson resonant production at $\mu^+\mu^-$ and $e^+e^-$ colliders by convoluting with the beam energy spread profile of the collider and the Breit-Wigner resonance profile of the signal. We assess their impact on both the Higgs signal and SM backgrounds for the leading decay channels $h\rightarrow b\bar b,\ WW^*$. Our study improves the existing analyses of the proposed future resonant Higgs factories and provides further guidance for the accelerator designs with respect to the physical goals. Read More

This report summarises the properties of Standard Model processes at the 100 TeV pp collider. We document the production rates and typical distributions for a number of benchmark Standard Model processes, and discuss new dynamical phenomena arising at the highest energies available at this collider. We discuss the intrinsic physics interest in the measurement of these Standard Model processes, as well as their role as backgrounds for New Physics searches. Read More

This paper proposes an alternating back-propagation algorithm for learning the generator network model. The model is a non-linear generalization of factor analysis. In this model, the mapping from the continuous latent factors to the observed signal is parametrized by a convolutional neural network. Read More

In this paper, we consider a two-dimensional heterogeneous cellular network scenario consisting of one base station (BS) and some mobile stations (MSs) whose locations follow a Poisson point process (PPP). The MSs are equipped with multiple radio access interfaces including a cellular access interface and at least one short-range communication interface. We propose a nearest-neighbor cooperation communication (NNCC) scheme by exploiting the short-range communication between a MS and its nearest neighbor to collaborate on their uplink transmissions. Read More

This paper investigates the energy saving of base station (BS) deployed in a 1-D multi-hop vehicular network with sleep scheduling strategy. We consider cooperative BS scheduling strategy where BSs can switch between sleep and active modes to reduce the average energy consumption utilizing the information of vehicular speeds and locations. Assuming a Poisson distribution of vehicles, we derive an appropriate probability distribution function of distance between two adjacent cluster heads, where a cluster is a maximal set of vehicles in which every two adjacent vehicles can communicate directly when their Euclidean distance is less than or equal to a threshold, known as the communication range of vehicles. Read More

We demonstrate that encapsulation of atomically thin black phosphorus (BP) by hexagonal boron nitride (h-BN) sheets is very effective for minimizing the interface impurities induced during fabrication of BP channel material for quantum transport nanodevices. Highly stable BP nanodevices with ultrahigh mobility and controllable types are realized through depositing appropriate metal electrodes after conducting a selective etching to the BP encapsulation structure. Chromium and titanium are suitable metal electrodes for BP channels to control the transition from a p-type unipolar property to ambipolar characteristic because of different work functions. Read More

In this paper, a new framework of mobile converged networks is proposed for flexible resource optimization over multi-tier wireless heterogeneous networks. Design principles and advantages of this new framework of mobile converged networks are discussed. Moreover, mobile converged network models based on interference coordination and energy efficiency are presented and the corresponding optimization algorithms are developed. Read More

To meet the ever-growing demand for a higher communicating rate and better communication quality, more and more small cells are overlaid under the macro base station (MBS) tier, thus forming the heterogeneous networks. Small cells can ease the load pressure of MBS but lack of the guarantee of performance. On the other hand, cooperation draws more and more attention because of the great potential of small cell densification. Read More

2016Jun

This report summarises the physics opportunities in the search and study of physics beyond the Standard Model at a 100 TeV pp collider. Read More

Deep Convolutional Neural Networks (CNN) have exhibited superior performance in many visual recognition tasks including image classification, object detection, and scene label- ing, due to their large learning capacity and resistance to overfit. For the image classification task, most of the current deep CNN- based approaches take the whole size-normalized image as input and have achieved quite promising results. Compared with the previously dominating approaches based on feature extraction, pooling, and classification, the deep CNN-based approaches mainly rely on the learning capability of deep CNN to achieve superior results: the burden of minimizing intra-class variation while maximizing inter-class difference is entirely dependent on the implicit feature learning component of deep CNN; we rely upon the implicitly learned filters and pooling component to select the discriminative regions, which correspond to the activated neurons. Read More

In this article, a network model incorporating both line-of-sight (LOS) and non-line-of-sight (NLOS) transmissions is proposed to investigate impacts of blockages in urban areas on heterogeneous network coverage performance. Results show that co-existence of NLOS and LOS transmissions has a significant impact on network performance. We find in urban areas, that deploying more BSs in different tiers is better than merely deploying all BSs in the same tier in terms of coverage probability. Read More

With the massive multi-input multi-output (MIMO) antennas technology adopted for the fifth generation (5G) wireless communication systems, a large number of radio frequency (RF) chains have to be employed for RF circuits. However, a large number of RF chains not only increase the cost of RF circuits but also consume additional energy in 5G wireless communication systems. In this paper we investigate energy and cost efficiency optimization solutions for 5G wireless communication systems with a large number of antennas and RF chains. Read More

Currently, the state-of-the-art image classification algorithms outperform the best available object detector by a big margin in terms of average precision. We, therefore, propose a simple yet principled approach that allows us to leverage object detection through image classification on supporting regions specified by a preliminary object detector. Using a simple bag-of- words model based image classification algorithm, we leveraged the performance of the deformable model objector from 35. Read More

Atomically thin black phosphorus (BP) is a promising two-dimensional material for fabricating electronic and optoelectronic nano-devices with high mobility and tunable bandgap structures. However, the charge-carrier mobility in few-layer phosphorene (monolayer BP) is mainly limited by the presence of impurity and disorders. In this study, we demonstrate that vertical BP heterostructure devices offer great advantages in probing the electron states of monolayer and few-layer phosphorene at temperatures down to 2 K through capacitance spectroscopy. Read More

This draft report summarizes and details the findings, results, and recommendations derived from the ASCR/HEP Exascale Requirements Review meeting held in June, 2015. The main conclusions are as follows. 1) Larger, more capable computing and data facilities are needed to support HEP science goals in all three frontiers: Energy, Intensity, and Cosmic. Read More

Low energy inelastic neutron scattering on single crystals of the kagome spin liquid compound ZnCu3(OD)6Cl2 (Herbertsmithite) reveals antiferromagnetic correlations between impurity spins for energy transfers E < 0.8 meV (~J/20). The momentum dependence differs significantly from higher energy scattering which arises from the intrinsic kagome spins. Read More

Traditional ultra-dense wireless networks are recommended as a complement for cellular networks and are deployed in partial areas, such as hotspot and indoor scenarios. Based on the massive multiple-input multi-output (MIMO) antennas and the millimeter wavecommunication technologies, the 5G ultra-dense cellular network is proposed to deploy in overall cellular scenarios. Moreover, a distribution network architecture is presented for 5G ultra-dense cellular networks. Read More

We show that an end-to-end deep learning approach can be used to recognize either English or Mandarin Chinese speech--two vastly different languages. Because it replaces entire pipelines of hand-engineered components with neural networks, end-to-end learning allows us to handle a diverse variety of speech including noisy environments, accents and different languages. Key to our approach is our application of HPC techniques, resulting in a 7x speedup over our previous system. Read More

The discovery of the Higgs boson at the LHC exposes some of the most profound mysteries fundamental physics has encountered in decades, opening the door to the next phase of experimental exploration. More than ever, this will necessitate new machines to push us deeper into the energy frontier. In this article, we discuss the physics motivation and present the physics potential of a proton-proton collider running at an energy significantly beyond that of the LHC and a luminosity comparable to that of the LHC. Read More

We study the Two-Higgs-Doublet Model with the aligned Yukawa sector (A2HDM) in light of the observed excess measured in the muon anomalous magnetic moment. We take into account the existing theoretical and experimental constraints with up-to-date values and demonstrate that a phenomenologically interesting region of parameter space exists. With a detailed parameter scan, we show a much larger region of viable parameter space in this model beyond the limiting case Type X 2HDM as obtained before. Read More

Interfaces between exfoliated topological insulator Bi2Se3 and several transition metals deposited by sputtering were studied by XPS, SIMS, UPS and contact I-V measurements. Chemically clean interfaces can be achieved when coating Bi2Se3 with a transition metal layer as thin as 1 nm, even without capping. Most interestingly, UPS spectra suggest depletion or inversion in the originally n-type topological insulator near the interface. Read More

The kagome Heisenberg antiferromagnet is a leading candidate in the search for a spin system with a quantum spin-liquid ground state. The nature of its ground state remains a matter of great debate. We conducted 17-O single crystal NMR measurements of the S=1/2 kagome lattice in herbertsmithite ZnCu$_3$(OH)$_6$Cl$_2$, which is known to exhibit a spinon continuum in the spin excitation spectrum. Read More

In few-layer (FL) transition metal dichalcogenides (TMDC), the conduction bands along the Gamma-K directions shift downward energetically in the presence of interlayer interactions, forming six Q valleys related by three-fold rotational symmetry and time reversal symmetry. In even-layers the extra inversion symmetry requires all states to be Kramers degenerate, whereas in odd-layers the intrinsic inversion asymmetry dictates the Q valleys to be spin-valley coupled. In this Letter, we report the transport characterization of prominent Shubnikov-de Hass (SdH) oscillations for the Q valley electrons in FL transition metal disulfide (TMDs), as well as the first quantum Hall effect (QHE) in TMDCs. Read More

Negative compressibility generated by many-body effects in 2D electronic systems can enhance gate capacitance. We observe capacitance enhancement in a newly emerged 2D layered material, atomically thin black phosphorus (BP). The encapsulation of BP by hexagonal boron nitride sheets with few-layer graphene as a terminal ensures ultraclean heterostructure interfaces, allowing us to observe negative compressibility at low hole carrier concentrations. Read More

We demonstrate that a field effect transistor (FET) made of few layer black phosphorus (BP) encapsulated in hexagonal boron nitride (h-BN) in vacuum, exhibts the room temperature hole mobility of 5200 $cm^2/Vs$ being limited just by the phonon scattering. At cryogenic tempeature the FET mobility increases up to 45,000 $cm^2/Vs$, which is eight times higher compared with the mobility obtained in earlier reports. The unprecedentedly clean h-BN/BP/h-BN heterostructure exhibits Shubnikov-de Haas oscillations and quantum Hall effect with Landau level (LL) filling factors down to v=2 in conventional laboratory magnetic fields. Read More