Swan Dubois - REGAL, UPMC

Swan Dubois
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Swan Dubois
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REGAL, UPMC
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Computer Science - Distributed; Parallel; and Cluster Computing (27)
 
Computer Science - Data Structures and Algorithms (4)
 
Computer Science - Networking and Internet Architecture (2)
 
Computer Science - Discrete Mathematics (2)

Publications Authored By Swan Dubois

We investigate a special case of hereditary property that we refer to as {\em robustness}. A property is {\em robust} in a given graph if it is inherited by all connected spanning subgraphs of this graph. We motivate this definition in different contexts, showing that it plays a central role in highly dynamic networks, although the problem is defined in terms of classical (static) graph theory. Read More

We consider systems made of autonomous mobile robots evolving in highly dynamic discrete environment i.e., graphs where edges may appear and disappear unpredictably without any recurrence, stability, nor periodicity assumption. Read More

In this paper we study the task of approach of two mobile agents having the same limited range of vision and moving asynchronously in the plane. This task consists in getting them in finite time within each other's range of vision. The agents execute the same deterministic algorithm and are assumed to have a compass showing the cardinal directions as well as a unit measure. Read More

This paper deals with the classical problem of exploring a ring by a cohort of synchronous robots. We focus on the perpetual version of this problem in which it is required that each node of the ring is visited by a robot infinitely often. The challenge in this paper is twofold. Read More

In its classical form, a consistent replicated service requires all replicas to witness the same evolution of the service state. Assuming a message-passing environment with a majority of correct processes, the necessary and sufficient information about failures for implementing a general state machine replication scheme ensuring consistency is captured by the {\Omega} failure detector. This paper shows that in such a message-passing environment, {\Omega} is also the weakest failure detector to implement an eventually consistent replicated service, where replicas are expected to agree on the evolution of the service state only after some (a priori unknown) time. Read More

We address the problem of computing a Minimal Dominating Set in highly dynamic distributed systems. We assume weak connectivity, i.e. Read More

We address highly dynamic distributed systems modeled by time-varying graphs (TVGs). We interest in proof of impossibility results that often use informal arguments about convergence. First, we provide a distance among TVGs to define correctly the convergence of TVG sequences. Read More

Self-stabilization ensures that, after any transient fault, the system recovers in a finite time and eventually exhibits a correct behaviour. Speculation consists in guaranteeing that the system satisfies its requirements for any execution but exhibits significantly better performances for a subset of executions that are more probable. A speculative protocol is in this sense supposed to be both robust and efficient in practice. Read More

Self-stabilization ensures that, after any transient fault, the system recovers in a finite time and eventually exhibits. Speculation consists in guaranteeing that the system satisfies its requirements for any execution but exhibits significantly better performances for a subset of executions that are more probable. A speculative protocol is in this sense supposed to be both robust and efficient in practice. Read More

A self-stabilizing protocol tolerates by definition transient faults (faults of finite duration). Recently, a new class of self-stabilizing protocols that are able to tolerate a given number of permanent faults. In this paper, we focus on self-stabilizing protocols able to tolerate Byzantine faults, that is faults that introduce an arbitrary behaviour. Read More

We investigate the hardness of establishing as many stable marriages (that is, marriages that last forever) in a population whose memory is placed in some arbitrary state with respect to the considered problem, and where traitors try to jeopardize the whole process by behaving in a harmful manner. On the negative side, we demonstrate that no solution that is completely insensitive to traitors can exist, and we propose a protocol for the problem that is optimal with respect to the traitor containment radius. Read More

We survey existing scheduling hypotheses made in the literature in self-stabilization, commonly referred to under the notion of daemon. We show that four main characteristics (distribution, fairness, boundedness, and enabledness) are enough to encapsulate the various differences presented in existing work. Our naming scheme makes it easy to compare daemons of particular classes, and to extend existing possibility or impossibility results to new daemons. Read More

In this paper, we consider the message forwarding problem that consists in managing the network resources that are used to forward messages. Previous works on this problem provide solutions that either use a significant number of buffers (that is n buffers per processor, where n is the number of processors in the network) making the solution not scalable or, they reserve all the buffers from the sender to the receiver to forward only one message %while using D buffers (where D refers to the diameter of the network) . The only solution that uses a constant number of buffers per link was introduced in [1]. Read More

2011Apr
Affiliations: 1LIP6, INRIA Rocquencourt, 2Department of Information and Computer sciences Osaka University, 3LIP6, IUF

Self-stabilization is a versatile approach to fault-tolerance since it permits a distributed system to recover from any transient fault that arbitrarily corrupts the contents of all memories in the system. Byzantine tolerance is an attractive feature of distributed systems that permits to cope with arbitrary malicious behaviors. This paper focus on systems that are both self-stabilizing and Byzantine tolerant. Read More

2011Apr
Affiliations: 1LIP6, INRIA Rocquencourt, 2LIP6, INRIA Rocquencourt, 3LIP6, INRIA Rocquencourt, 4LIP6, INRIA Saclay - Ile de France

A self-stabilizing protocol has the capacity to recover a legitimate behavior whatever is its initial state. The majority of works in self-stabilization assume a shared memory model or a communication using reliable and FIFO channels. In this article, we interest in self-stabilizing systems using bounded but non reliable and non FIFO channels. Read More

2011Apr
Affiliations: 1LIP6, INRIA Rocquencourt, 2Department of Information and Computer sciences Osaka University, 3LIP6, INRIA Saclay - Ile de France

A self-stabilizing is naturally resilient to transients faults (that is, faults of finite duration). Recently, a new class of protocol appears. These protocols are self-stabilizing and are moreover resilient to a limited number of permanent faults. Read More

2011Mar
Affiliations: 1LIP6, INRIA Rocquencourt, 2Department of Information and Computer sciences Osaka University, 3LIP6

Self-stabilization is a versatile approach to fault-tolerance since it permits a distributed system to recover from any transient fault that arbitrarily corrupts the contents of all memories in the system. Byzantine tolerance is an attractive feature of distributed systems that permits to cope with arbitrary malicious behaviors. We consider the well known problem of constructing a maximum metric tree in this context. Read More

2010Nov

Self-stabilizing systems have the ability to converge to a correct behavior when started in any configuration. Most of the work done so far in the self-stabilization area assumed either communication via shared memory or via FIFO channels. This paper is the first to lay the bases for the design of self-stabilizing message passing algorithms over unreliable non-FIFO channels. Read More

A self-stabilizing simulation of a single-writer multi-reader atomic register is presented. The simulation works in asynchronous message-passing systems, and allows processes to crash, as long as at least a majority of them remain working. A key element in the simulation is a new combinatorial construction of a bounded labeling scheme that can accommodate arbitrary labels, i. Read More

In this paper, we present the first snap-stabilizing message forwarding protocol that uses a number of buffers per node being inde- pendent of any global parameter, that is 4 buffers per link. The protocol works on a linear chain of nodes, that is possibly an overlay on a large- scale and dynamic system, e.g. Read More

2010May
Affiliations: 1LIP6, INRIA Rocquencourt, 2Department of Information and Computer Sciences, Osaka University, 3LIP6

Self-stabilization is a versatile approach to fault-tolerance since it permits a distributed system to recover from any transient fault that arbitrarily corrupts the contents of all memories in the system. Byzantine tolerance is an attractive feature of distributed systems that permits to cope with arbitrary malicious behaviors. We consider the well known problem of constructing a breadth-first spanning tree in this context. Read More

2010May
Affiliations: 1LIP6, INRIA Rocquencourt, 2Department of Information and Computer sciences Osaka University, 3LIP6

Self-stabilization is a versatile approach to fault-tolerance since it permits a distributed system to recover from any transient fault that arbitrarily corrupts the contents of all memories in the system. Byzantine tolerance is an attractive feature of distributed systems that permits to cope with arbitrary malicious behaviors. Combining these two properties proved difficult: it is impossible to contain the spatial impact of Byzantine nodes in a self-stabilizing context for global tasks such as tree orientation and tree construction. Read More

2010May
Affiliations: 1LIP6, INRIA Rocquencourt, 2Department of Information and Computer sciences Osaka University, 3LIP6

Self-stabilization is an versatile approach to fault-tolerance since it permits a distributed system to recover from any transient fault that arbitrarily corrupts the contents of all memories in the system. Byzantine tolerance is an attractive feature of distributed system that permits to cope with arbitrary malicious behaviors. We consider the well known problem of constructing a maximum metric tree in this context. Read More

A self-stabilizing protocol provides by definition a tolerance to transient failures. Recently, a new class of self-stabilizing protocols appears. These protocols provides also a tolerance to a given number of permanent failures. Read More

We explore asynchronous unison in the presence of systemic transient and permanent Byzantine faults in shared memory. We observe that the problem is not solvable under less than strongly fair scheduler or for system topologies with maximum node degree greater than two. We present a self-stabilizing Byzantine-tolerant solution to asynchronous unison for chain and ring topologies. Read More

A snap-stabilizing protocol, starting from any configuration, always behaves according to its specification. In this paper, we present a snap-stabilizing protocol to solve the message forwarding problem in a message-switched network. In this problem, we must manage resources of the system to deliver messages to any processor of the network. Read More

A snap-stabilizing algorithm ensures that it always behaves according to its specifications whenever it starts from an arbitrary configuration. In this paper, we interest in the message forwarding problem in a message-switched network. We must manage network ressources in order to deliver messages to any processor of the network. Read More

Distributed fault-tolerance can mask the effect of a limited number of permanent faults, while self-stabilization provides forward recovery after an arbitrary number of transient fault hit the system. FTSS protocols combine the best of both worlds since they are simultaneously fault-tolerant and self-stabilizing. To date, FTSS solutions either consider static (i. Read More