S. Wood - HKS - JLab E05-115 and E01-001 - Collaborations

S. Wood
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S. Wood
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HKS - JLab E05-115 and E01-001 - Collaborations
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Nuclear Experiment (22)
 
High Energy Physics - Theory (13)
 
Mathematics - Quantum Algebra (11)
 
Statistics - Methodology (7)
 
Mathematics - Mathematical Physics (7)
 
Mathematical Physics (7)
 
Physics - Instrumentation and Detectors (5)
 
Mathematics - Representation Theory (5)
 
Nuclear Theory (4)
 
Statistics - Applications (4)
 
Statistics - Computation (2)
 
Astrophysics of Galaxies (2)
 
High Energy Physics - Experiment (2)
 
Physics - Accelerator Physics (1)
 
Mathematics - Category Theory (1)
 
Mathematics - Number Theory (1)
 
Solar and Stellar Astrophysics (1)
 
Statistics - Machine Learning (1)
 
Instrumentation and Methods for Astrophysics (1)

Publications Authored By S. Wood

The modular properties of the simple vertex operator superalgebra associated to the affine Kac-Moody superalgebra $\widehat{\mathfrak{osp}} \left( 1 \middle\vert 2 \right)$ at level $-\frac{5}{4}$ are investigated. After classifying the relaxed highest-weight modules over this vertex operator superalgebra, the characters and supercharacters of the simple weight modules are computed and their modular transforms are determined. This leads to a complete list of the Grothendieck fusion rules by way of a continuous superalgebraic analogue of the Verlinde formula. Read More

We use ALMA to detect and image CO (1-0) emission from Minkowski's Object, a dwarf galaxy that is interacting with a radio jet from a nearby elliptical galaxy. These observations are the first to detect molecular gas in Minkowski's Object. We estimate the range in the mass of molecular gas in Minkowski's Object assuming two different values of the ratio of the molecular gas mass to the CO luminosity, $\alpha_{\rm CO}$. Read More

We propose to measure the photo-production cross section of $J/{\psi}$ near threshold, in search of the recently observed LHCb hidden-charm resonances $P_c$(4380) and $P_c$(4450) consistent with 'pentaquarks'. The observation of these resonances in photo-production will provide strong evidence of the true resonance nature of the LHCb states, distinguishing them from kinematic enhancements. A bremsstrahlung photon beam produced with an 11 GeV electron beam at CEBAF covers the energy range of $J/{\psi}$ production from the threshold photo-production energy of 8. Read More

Hadronic reactions producing strange quarks such as exclusive or semi-inclusive kaon production, play an important role in studies of hadron structure and the dynamics that bind the most basic elements of nuclear physics. The small-angle capability of the new Super High Momentum Spectrometer (SHMS) in Hall C, coupled with its high momentum reach - up to the anticipated 11-GeV beam energy in Hall C - and coincidence capability with the well-understood High Momentum Spectrometer, will allow for probes of such hadron structure involving strangeness down to the smallest distance scales to date. To cleanly select the kaons, a threshold aerogel Cerenkov detector has been constructed for the SHMS. Read More

2016Jun
Affiliations: 1HKS, 2HKS, 3HKS, 4HKS, 5HKS, 6HKS, 7HKS, 8HKS, 9HKS, 10HKS, 11HKS, 12HKS, 13HKS, 14HKS, 15HKS, 16HKS, 17HKS, 18HKS, 19HKS, 20HKS, 21HKS, 22HKS, 23HKS, 24HKS, 25HKS, 26HKS, 27HKS, 28HKS, 29HKS, 30HKS, 31HKS, 32HKS, 33HKS, 34HKS, 35HKS, 36HKS, 37HKS, 38HKS, 39HKS, 40HKS, 41HKS, 42HKS, 43HKS, 44HKS, 45HKS, 46HKS, 47HKS, 48HKS, 49HKS, 50HKS, 51HKS, 52HKS, 53HKS, 54HKS, 55HKS, 56HKS, 57HKS, 58HKS, 59HKS, 60HKS, 61HKS, 62HKS, 63HKS, 64HKS, 65HKS, 66HKS, 67HKS, 68HKS, 69HKS, 70HKS, 71HKS, 72HKS, 73HKS, 74HKS, 75HKS, 76HKS, 77HKS, 78HKS, 79HKS, 80HKS, 81HKS, 82HKS, 83HKS, 84HKS, 85HKS, 86HKS

The missing mass spectroscopy of the $^{7}_{\Lambda}$He hypernucleus was performed, using the $^{7}$Li$(e,e^{\prime}K^{+})^{7}_{\Lambda}$He reaction at the Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility Hall C. The $\Lambda$ binding energy of the ground state (1/2$^{+}$) was determined with a smaller error than that of the previous measurement, being $B_{\Lambda}$ = 5.55 $\pm$ 0. Read More

We consider the estimation of smoothing parameters and variance components in models with a regular log likelihood subject to quadratic penalization of the model coefficients, via a generalization of the method of Fellner (1986) and Schall (1991). In particular: (i) we generalize the original method to the case of penalties that are linear in several smoothing parameters, thereby covering the important cases of tensor product and adaptive smoothers; (ii) we show why the method's steps increase the restricted marginal likelihood of the model, that it tends to converge faster than the EM algorithm, or obvious accelerations of this, and investigate its relation to Newton optimization; (iii) we generalize the method to any Fisher regular likelihood. The method represents a considerable simplification over existing methods of estimating smoothing parameters in the context of regular likelihoods, without sacrificing generality: for example, it is only necessary to compute with the same first and second derivatives of the log-likelihood required for coefficient estimation, and not with the third or fourth order derivatives required by alternative approaches. Read More

We give new proofs of the rationality of the N=1 superconformal minimal model vertex operator superalgebras and of the classification of their modules in both the Neveu-Schwarz and Ramond sectors. For this, we combine the standard free field realisation with the theory of Jack symmetric functions. A key role is played by Jack symmetric polynomials with a certain negative parameter that are labelled by admissible partitions. Read More

Structure functions, as measured in lepton-nucleon scattering, have proven to be very useful in studying the quark dynamics within the nucleon. However, it is experimentally difficult to separately determine the longitudinal and transverse structure functions, and consequently there are substantially less data available for the longitudinal structure function in particular. Here we present separated structure functions for hydrogen and deuterium at low four--momentum transfer squared, Q^2< 1 GeV^2, and compare these with parton distribution parameterizations and a k_T factorization approach. Read More

A recent novel derivation of the representation of Virasoro singular vectors in terms of Jack polynomials is extended to the supersymmetric case. The resulting expression of a generic super-Virasoro singular vector is given in terms of a simple differential operator (whose form is characteristic of the sector, Neveu-Schwarz or Ramond) acting on a Jack superpolynomial. The latter is indexed by a superpartition depending upon the two integers r,s that specify the reducible module under consideration. Read More

Los Alamos National Laboratory has calculated a new generation of radiative opacities (OPLIB data using the ATOMIC code) for elements with atomic number Z=1-30 with improved physics input, updated atomic data, and finer temperature grid to replace the Los Alamos LEDCOP opacities released in the year 2000. We calculate the evolution of standard solar models including these new opacities, and compare with models evolved using the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory OPAL (Iglesias and Rogers 1996) opacities. We use the solar abundance mixture of Asplund et al. Read More

The P-splines of Eilers and Marx (1996) combine a B-spline basis with a discrete quadratic penalty on the basis coefficients, to produce a reduced rank spline like smoother. P-splines have three properties that make them very popular as reduced rank smoothers: i) the basis and the penalty are sparse, enabling efficient computation, especially for Bayesian stochastic simulation; ii) it is possible to flexibly `mix-and-match' the order of B-spline basis and penalty, rather than the order of penalty controlling the order of the basis as in spline smoothing; iii) it is very easy to set up the B-spline basis functions and penalties. The discrete penalties are somewhat less interpretable in terms of function shape than the traditional derivative based spline penalties, but tend towards penalties proportional to traditional spline penalties in the limit of large basis size. Read More

Generalised Degrees of Freedom (GDF), as defined by Ye (1998 JASA 93:120-131), represent the sensitivity of model fits to perturbations of the data. As such they can be computed for any statistical model, making it possible, in principle, to derive the number of parameters in machine-learning approaches. Defined originally for normally distributed data only, we here investigate the potential of this approach for Bernoulli-data. Read More

Two new approaches for checking the dimension of the basis functions when using penalized regression smoothers are presented. The first approach is a test for adequacy of the basis dimension based on an estimate of the residual variance calculated by differencing residuals that are neighbours according to the smooth covariates. The second approach is based on estimated degrees of freedom for a smooth of the model residuals with respect to the model covariates. Read More

The BUGS language offers a very flexible way of specifying complex statistical models for the purposes of Gibbs sampling, while its JAGS variant offers very convenient R integration via the rjags package. However, including smoothers in JAGS models can involve some quite tedious coding, especially for multivariate or adaptive smoothers. Further, if an additive smooth structure is required then some care is needed, in order to centre smooths appropriately, and to find appropriate starting values. Read More

The challenges posed by complex stochastic models used in computational ecology, biology and genetics have stimulated the development of approximate approaches to statistical inference. Here we focus on Synthetic Likelihood (SL), a procedure that reduces the observed and simulated data to a set of summary statistics, and quantifies the discrepancy between them through a synthetic likelihood function. SL requires little tuning, but it relies on the approximate normality of the summary statistics. Read More

A problem that tends to be ignored in the statistical analysis of experimental data in the language sciences is that responses often constitute time series, which raises the problem of autocorrelated errors. If the errors indeed show autocorrelational structure, evaluation of the significance of predictors in the model becomes problematic due to potential anti-conservatism of p-values. This paper illustrates two tools offered by Generalized Additive Mixed Models (GAMMs) (Lin and Zhang, 1999; Wood, 2006, 2011, 2013) for dealing with autocorrelated errors, as implemented in the current version of the fourth author's mgcv package (1. Read More

This paper discusses a general framework for smoothing parameter estimation for models with regular likelihoods constructed in terms of unknown smooth functions of covariates. Gaussian random effects and parametric terms may also be present. By construction the method is numerically stable and convergent, and enables smoothing parameter uncertainty to be quantified. Read More

This document is due to appear as a chapter of the forthcoming Handbook of Approximate Bayesian Computation (ABC) by S. Sisson, L. Fan, and M. Read More

We present the stellar and gas kinematics of DDO 46 and DDO 168 from the LITTLE THINGS survey and determine their respective Vmax/sigma_z,0 values. We used the KPNO's 4-meter telescope with the Echelle spectrograph as a long-slit spectrograph. We acquired spectra of DDO 168 along four position angles by placing the slit over the morphological major and minor axes and two intermediate position angles. Read More

2015Apr
Authors: ALMA Partnership1, E. B. Fomalont2, C. Vlahakis3, S. Corder4, A. Remijan5, D. Barkats6, R. Lucas7, T. R. Hunter8, C. L. Brogan9, Y. Asaki10, S. Matsushita11, W. R. F. Dent12, R. E. Hills13, N. Phillips14, A. M. S. Richards15, P. Cox16, R. Amestica17, D. Broguiere18, W. Cotton19, A. S. Hales20, R. Hiriart21, A. Hirota22, J. A. Hodge23, C. M. V. Impellizzeri24, J. Kern25, R. Kneissl26, E. Liuzzo27, N. Marcelino28, R. Marson29, A. Mignano30, K. Nakanishi31, B. Nikolic32, J. E. Perez33, L. M. Pérez34, I. Toledo35, R. Aladro36, B. Butler37, J. Cortes38, P. Cortes39, V. Dhawan40, J. Di Francesco41, D. Espada42, F. Galarza43, D. Garcia-Appadoo44, L. Guzman-Ramirez45, E. M. Humphreys46, T. Jung47, S. Kameno48, R. A. Laing49, S. Leon50, J. Mangum51, G. Marconi52, H. Nagai53, L. -A. Nyman54, M. Radiszcz55, J. A. Rodón56, T. Sawada57, S. Takahashi58, R. P. J. Tilanus59, T. van Kempen60, B. Vila Vilaro61, L. C. Watson62, T. Wiklind63, F. Gueth64, K. Tatematsu65, A. Wootten66, A. Castro-Carrizo67, E. Chapillon68, G. Dumas69, I. de Gregorio-Monsalvo70, H. Francke71, J. Gallardo72, J. Garcia73, S. Gonzalez74, J. E. Hibbard75, T. Hill76, T. Kaminski77, A. Karim78, M. Krips79, Y. Kurono80, C. Lopez81, S. Martin82, L. Maud83, F. Morales84, V. Pietu85, K. Plarre86, G. Schieven87, L. Testi88, L. Videla89, E. Villard90, N. Whyborn91, M. A. Zwaan92, F. Alves93, P. Andreani94, A. Avison95, M. Barta96, F. Bedosti97, G. J. Bendo98, F. Bertoldi99, M. Bethermin100, A. Biggs101, J. Boissier102, J. Brand103, S. Burkutean104, V. Casasola105, J. Conway106, L. Cortese107, B. Dabrowski108, T. A. Davis109, M. Diaz Trigo110, F. Fontani111, R. Franco-Hernandez112, G. Fuller113, R. Galvan Madrid114, A. Giannetti115, A. Ginsburg116, S. F. Graves117, E. Hatziminaoglou118, M. Hogerheijde119, P. Jachym120, I. Jimenez Serra121, M. Karlicky122, P. Klaasen123, M. Kraus124, D. Kunneriath125, C. Lagos126, S. Longmore127, S. Leurini128, M. Maercker129, B. Magnelli130, I. Marti Vidal131, M. Massardi132, A. Maury133, S. Muehle134, S. Muller135, T. Muxlow136, E. O'Gorman137, R. Paladino138, D. Petry139, J. Pineda140, S. Randall141, J. S. Richer142, A. Rossetti143, A. Rushton144, K. Rygl145, A. Sanchez Monge146, R. Schaaf147, P. Schilke148, T. Stanke149, M. Schmalzl150, F. Stoehr151, S. Urban152, E. van Kampen153, W. Vlemmings154, K. Wang155, W. Wild156, Y. Yang157, S. Iguchi158, T. Hasegawa159, M. Saito160, J. Inatani161, N. Mizuno162, S. Asayama163, G. Kosugi164, K. -I. Morita165, K. Chiba166, S. Kawashima167, S. K. Okumura168, N. Ohashi169, R. Ogasawara170, S. Sakamoto171, T. Noguchi172, Y. -D. Huang173, S. -Y. Liu174, F. Kemper175, P. M. Koch176, M. -T. Chen177, Y. Chikada178, M. Hiramatsu179, D. Iono180, M. Shimojo181, S. Komugi182, J. Kim183, A. -R. Lyo184, E. Muller185, C. Herrera186, R. E. Miura187, J. Ueda188, J. Chibueze189, Y. -N. Su190, A. Trejo-Cruz191, K. -S. Wang192, H. Kiuchi193, N. Ukita194, M. Sugimoto195, R. Kawabe196, M. Hayashi197, S. Miyama198, P. T. P. Ho199, N. Kaifu200, M. Ishiguro201, A. J. Beasley202, S. Bhatnagar203, J. A. Braatz III204, D. G. Brisbin205, N. Brunetti206, C. Carilli207, J. H. Crossley208, L. D'Addario209, J. L. Donovan Meyer210, D. T. Emerson211, A. S. Evans212, P. Fisher213, K. Golap214, D. M. Griffith215, A. E. Hale216, D. Halstead217, E. J. Hardy218, M. C. Hatz219, M. Holdaway220, R. Indebetouw221, P. R. Jewell222, A. A. Kepley223, D. -C. Kim224, M. D. Lacy225, A. K. Leroy226, H. S. Liszt227, C. J. Lonsdale228, B. Matthews229, M. McKinnon230, B. S. Mason231, G. Moellenbrock232, A. Moullet233, S. T. Myers234, J. Ott235, A. B. Peck236, J. Pisano237, S. J. E. Radford238, W. T. Randolph239, U. Rao Venkata240, M. G. Rawlings241, R. Rosen242, S. L. Schnee243, K. S. Scott244, N. K. Sharp245, K. Sheth246, R. S. Simon247, T. Tsutsumi248, S. J. Wood249
Affiliations: 1Joint ALMA Observatory, Chile, 2Joint ALMA Observatory, Chile, 3Joint ALMA Observatory, Chile, 4Joint ALMA Observatory, Chile, 5Joint ALMA Observatory, Chile, 6Joint ALMA Observatory, Chile, 7Institut de Planetologie et d'Astrophysique de Grenoble, France, 8National Radio Astronomy Observatory, Charlottesville, USA, 9National Radio Astronomy Observatory, Charlottesville, USA, 10National Astronomical Observatory of Japan, Japan, 11Institute of Astronomy and Astrophysics, Academia Sinica, Taiwan, 12Joint ALMA Observatory, Chile, 13Astrophysics Group, Cavendish Laboratory, UK, 14Joint ALMA Observatory, Chile, 15Jodrell Bank Centre for Astrophysics, School of Physics and Astronomy, University of Manchester, UK, 16Joint ALMA Observatory, Chile, 17National Radio Astronomy Observatory, Charlottesville, USA, 18IRAM, France, 19National Radio Astronomy Observatory, Charlottesville, USA, 20Joint ALMA Observatory, Chile, 21National Radio Astronomy Observatory, Socorro, USA, 22Joint ALMA Observatory, Chile, 23National Radio Astronomy Observatory, Charlottesville, USA, 24Joint ALMA Observatory, Chile, 25National Radio Astronomy Observatory, Socorro, USA, 26Joint ALMA Observatory, Chile, 27INAF, Bologna, Italy, 28INAF, Bologna, Italy, 29National Radio Astronomy Observatory, Socorro, USA, 30INAF, Bologna, Italy, 31Joint ALMA Observatory, Chile, 32Astrophysics Group, Cavendish Laboratory, UK, 33National Radio Astronomy Observatory, Charlottesville, USA, 34National Radio Astronomy Observatory, Socorro, USA, 35Joint ALMA Observatory, Chile, 36European Southern Observatory, Chile, 37National Radio Astronomy Observatory, Charlottesville, USA, 38Joint ALMA Observatory, Chile, 39Joint ALMA Observatory, Chile, 40National Radio Astronomy Observatory, Socorro, USA, 41National Research Council Herzberg Astronomy & Astrophysics, Canada, 42Joint ALMA Observatory, Chile, 43Joint ALMA Observatory, Chile, 44Joint ALMA Observatory, Chile, 45European Southern Observatory, Chile, 46European Southern Observatory, Garching bei Munchen, Germany, 47Korea Astronomy and Space Science Institute, Korea, 48Joint ALMA Observatory, Chile, 49European Southern Observatory, Garching bei Munchen, Germany, 50Joint ALMA Observatory, Chile, 51National Radio Astronomy Observatory, Charlottesville, USA, 52Joint ALMA Observatory, Chile, 53National Astronomical Observatory of Japan, Japan, 54Joint ALMA Observatory, Chile, 55Joint ALMA Observatory, Chile, 56European Southern Observatory, Chile, 57Joint ALMA Observatory, Chile, 58Joint ALMA Observatory, Chile, 59Leiden Observatory, The Netherlands, 60Leiden Observatory, The Netherlands, 61Joint ALMA Observatory, Chile, 62European Southern Observatory, Chile, 63Joint ALMA Observatory, Chile, 64IRAM, France, 65National Astronomical Observatory of Japan, Japan, 66National Radio Astronomy Observatory, Charlottesville, USA, 67IRAM, France, 68IRAM, France, 69IRAM, France, 70Joint ALMA Observatory, Chile, 71Joint ALMA Observatory, Chile, 72Joint ALMA Observatory, Chile, 73Joint ALMA Observatory, Chile, 74Joint ALMA Observatory, Chile, 75National Radio Astronomy Observatory, Charlottesville, USA, 76Joint ALMA Observatory, Chile, 77European Southern Observatory, Chile, 78Argelander-Institut fur Astronomie, Bonn, Germany, 79IRAM, France, 80Joint ALMA Observatory, Chile, 81Joint ALMA Observatory, Chile, 82IRAM, France, 83Leiden Observatory, The Netherlands, 84Joint ALMA Observatory, Chile, 85IRAM, France, 86Joint ALMA Observatory, Chile, 87National Research Council Herzberg Astronomy & Astrophysics, Canada, 88European Southern Observatory, Garching bei Munchen, Germany, 89Joint ALMA Observatory, Chile, 90Joint ALMA Observatory, Chile, 91Joint ALMA Observatory, Chile, 92European Southern Observatory, Garching bei Munchen, Germany, 93Max Planck Institute for Extraterrestial Physics, Garching, Germany, 94European Southern Observatory, Garching bei Munchen, Germany, 95Jodrell Bank Centre for Astrophysics, School of Physics and Astronomy, University of Manchester, UK, 96Astronomical Institute of the Academy of Sciences of the Czech Republic, Czech Republic, 97INAF, Bologna, Italy, 98Jodrell Bank Centre for Astrophysics, School of Physics and Astronomy, University of Manchester, UK, 99Argelander-Institut fur Astronomie, Bonn, Germany, 100European Southern Observatory, Garching bei Munchen, Germany, 101European Southern Observatory, Garching bei Munchen, Germany, 102IRAM, France, 103INAF, Bologna, Italy, 104Argelander-Institut fur Astronomie, Bonn, Germany, 105INAF-Oss. Astrofisco di Arcetri, Italy, 106Department of Earth and Space Sciences, Chalmers University of Technology, Sweden, 107Centre for Astrophysics & Supercomputing, Swinburne University of Technology, Australia, 108Space Radio-diagnostics Research Center, Geodesy and Land Management, University of Warmia and Mazury, Poland, 109Centre for Astrophysics Research, Science & Technology Research Institute, University of Hertfordshire, UK, 110European Southern Observatory, Garching bei Munchen, Germany, 111INAF-Oss. Astrofisco di Arcetri, Italy, 112Departamento de Astronomia, Universidad de Chile, Chile, 113Jodrell Bank Centre for Astrophysics, School of Physics and Astronomy, University of Manchester, UK, 114Centro de Radiostronomia y Astrofisica, Universidad Nacional Autonoma de Mexico, Mexico, 115Argelander-Institut fur Astronomie, Bonn, Germany, 116European Southern Observatory, Garching bei Munchen, Germany, 117Astrophysics Group, Cavendish Laboratory, UK, 118European Southern Observatory, Garching bei Munchen, Germany, 119Leiden Observatory, The Netherlands, 120Astronomical Institute of the Academy of Sciences of the Czech Republic, Czech Republic, 121European Southern Observatory, Garching bei Munchen, Germany, 122Astronomical Institute of the Academy of Sciences of the Czech Republic, Czech Republic, 123Leiden Observatory, The Netherlands, 124Astronomical Institute of the Academy of Sciences of the Czech Republic, Czech Republic, 125Astronomical Institute of the Academy of Sciences of the Czech Republic, Czech Republic, 126European Southern Observatory, Garching bei Munchen, Germany, 127European Southern Observatory, Garching bei Munchen, Germany, 128Max-Planck-Institut fur Radioastronomie, Bonn, Germany, 129Department of Earth and Space Sciences, Chalmers University of Technology, Sweden, 130Argelander-Institut fur Astronomie, Bonn, Germany, 131Department of Earth and Space Sciences, Chalmers University of Technology, Sweden, 132INAF, Bologna, Italy, 133Laboratoire AIM, CEA/DSM-CNRS-Universite Paris Diderot, IRFU/Service dAstrophysique, France, 134Argelander-Institut fur Astronomie, Bonn, Germany, 135Max-Planck-Institut fur Radioastronomie, Bonn, Germany, 136Jodrell Bank Centre for Astrophysics, School of Physics and Astronomy, University of Manchester, UK, 137Max-Planck-Institut fur Radioastronomie, Bonn, Germany, 138INAF, Bologna, Italy, 139European Southern Observatory, Garching bei Munchen, Germany, 140Max Planck Institute for Extraterrestial Physics, Garching, Germany, 141European Southern Observatory, Garching bei Munchen, Germany, 142Astrophysics Group, Cavendish Laboratory, UK, 143INAF, Bologna, Italy, 144Department of Physics, Astrophysics, University of Oxford, UK, 145INAF, Bologna, Italy, 146I. Physikalisches Institut, Universitaet zu Koeln, Germany, 147Argelander-Institut fur Astronomie, Bonn, Germany, 148I. Physikalisches Institut, Universitaet zu Koeln, Germany, 149European Southern Observatory, Garching bei Munchen, Germany, 150Leiden Observatory, The Netherlands, 151European Southern Observatory, Garching bei Munchen, Germany, 152Astronomical Institute of the Academy of Sciences of the Czech Republic, Czech Republic, 153European Southern Observatory, Garching bei Munchen, Germany, 154Department of Earth and Space Sciences, Chalmers University of Technology, Sweden, 155European Southern Observatory, Garching bei Munchen, Germany, 156European Southern Observatory, Garching bei Munchen, Germany, 157Korea Astronomy and Space Science Institute, Korea, 158National Astronomical Observatory of Japan, Japan, 159National Astronomical Observatory of Japan, Japan, 160National Astronomical Observatory of Japan, Japan, 161National Astronomical Observatory of Japan, Japan, 162Joint ALMA Observatory, Chile, 163National Astronomical Observatory of Japan, Japan, 164National Astronomical Observatory of Japan, Japan, 165Joint ALMA Observatory, Chile, 166National Astronomical Observatory of Japan, Japan, 167National Astronomical Observatory of Japan, Japan, 168Faculty of Science, Japan Women's University, Japan, 169National Astronomical Observatory of Japan, Japan, 170National Astronomical Observatory of Japan, Japan, 171National Astronomical Observatory of Japan, Japan, 172National Astronomical Observatory of Japan, Japan, 173Institute of Astronomy and Astrophysics, Academia Sinica, Taiwan, 174Institute of Astronomy and Astrophysics, Academia Sinica, Taiwan, 175Institute of Astronomy and Astrophysics, Academia Sinica, Taiwan, 176Institute of Astronomy and Astrophysics, Academia Sinica, Taiwan, 177Institute of Astronomy and Astrophysics, Academia Sinica, Taiwan, 178National Astronomical Observatory of Japan, Japan, 179National Astronomical Observatory of Japan, Japan, 180National Astronomical Observatory of Japan, Japan, 181National Astronomical Observatory of Japan, Japan, 182National Astronomical Observatory of Japan, Japan, 183Korea Astronomy and Space Science Institute, Korea, 184Korea Astronomy and Space Science Institute, Korea, 185National Astronomical Observatory of Japan, Japan, 186National Astronomical Observatory of Japan, Japan, 187National Astronomical Observatory of Japan, Japan, 188National Astronomical Observatory of Japan, Japan, 189National Astronomical Observatory of Japan, Japan, 190Institute of Astronomy and Astrophysics, Academia Sinica, Taiwan, 191Institute of Astronomy and Astrophysics, Academia Sinica, Taiwan, 192Institute of Astronomy and Astrophysics, Academia Sinica, Taiwan, 193National Astronomical Observatory of Japan, Japan, 194National Astronomical Observatory of Japan, Japan, 195Joint ALMA Observatory, Chile, 196National Astronomical Observatory of Japan, Japan, 197National Astronomical Observatory of Japan, Japan, 198National Institutes of Natural Sciences, 199Institute of Astronomy and Astrophysics, Academia Sinica, Taiwan, 200National Astronomical Observatory of Japan, Japan, 201National Astronomical Observatory of Japan, Japan, 202National Radio Astronomy Observatory, Charlottesville, USA, 203National Radio Astronomy Observatory, Socorro, USA, 204National Radio Astronomy Observatory, Charlottesville, USA, 205National Radio Astronomy Observatory, Charlottesville, USA, 206National Radio Astronomy Observatory, Charlottesville, USA, 207National Radio Astronomy Observatory, Socorro, USA, 208National Radio Astronomy Observatory, Charlottesville, USA, 209Jet Propulsion Laboratory, California Institute of Technology, USA, 210National Radio Astronomy Observatory, Charlottesville, USA, 211National Radio Astronomy Observatory, Charlottesville, USA, 212National Radio Astronomy Observatory, Charlottesville, USA, 213National Radio Astronomy Observatory, Charlottesville, USA, 214National Radio Astronomy Observatory, Socorro, USA, 215National Radio Astronomy Observatory, Charlottesville, USA, 216National Radio Astronomy Observatory, Charlottesville, USA, 217National Radio Astronomy Observatory, Charlottesville, USA, 218National Radio Astronomy Observatory, Chile, 219National Radio Astronomy Observatory, Charlottesville, USA, 220National Radio Astronomy Observatory, Charlottesville, USA, 221National Radio Astronomy Observatory, Charlottesville, USA, 222National Radio Astronomy Observatory, Charlottesville, USA, 223National Radio Astronomy Observatory, Charlottesville, USA, 224National Radio Astronomy Observatory, Charlottesville, USA, 225National Radio Astronomy Observatory, Charlottesville, USA, 226National Radio Astronomy Observatory, Charlottesville, USA, 227National Radio Astronomy Observatory, Charlottesville, USA, 228National Radio Astronomy Observatory, Charlottesville, USA, 229National Research Council Herzberg Astronomy & Astrophysics, Canada, 230National Radio Astronomy Observatory, Charlottesville, USA, 231National Radio Astronomy Observatory, Charlottesville, USA, 232National Radio Astronomy Observatory, Socorro, USA, 233National Radio Astronomy Observatory, Charlottesville, USA, 234National Radio Astronomy Observatory, Socorro, USA, 235National Radio Astronomy Observatory, Socorro, USA, 236National Radio Astronomy Observatory, Charlottesville, USA, 237National Radio Astronomy Observatory, Charlottesville, USA, 238Cahill Center for Astronomy and Astrophysics, California Institute of Technology, USA, 239National Radio Astronomy Observatory, Charlottesville, USA, 240National Radio Astronomy Observatory, Socorro, USA, 241National Radio Astronomy Observatory, Charlottesville, USA, 242National Radio Astronomy Observatory, Charlottesville, USA, 243National Radio Astronomy Observatory, Charlottesville, USA, 244National Radio Astronomy Observatory, Charlottesville, USA, 245National Radio Astronomy Observatory, Charlottesville, USA, 246National Radio Astronomy Observatory, Charlottesville, USA, 247National Radio Astronomy Observatory, Charlottesville, USA, 248National Radio Astronomy Observatory, Socorro, USA, 249National Radio Astronomy Observatory, Charlottesville, USA

A major goal of the Atacama Large Millimeter/submillimeter Array (ALMA) is to make accurate images with resolutions of tens of milliarcseconds, which at submillimeter (submm) wavelengths requires baselines up to ~15 km. To develop and test this capability, a Long Baseline Campaign (LBC) was carried out from September to late November 2014, culminating in end-to-end observations, calibrations, and imaging of selected Science Verification (SV) targets. This paper presents an overview of the campaign and its main results, including an investigation of the short-term coherence properties and systematic phase errors over the long baselines at the ALMA site, a summary of the SV targets and observations, and recommendations for science observing strategies at long baselines. Read More

The fractional level models are (logarithmic) conformal field theories associated with affine Kac-Moody (super)algebras at certain levels $k \in \mathbb{Q}$. They are particularly noteworthy because of several longstanding difficulties that have only recently been resolved. Here, Wakimoto's free field realisation is combined with the theory of Jack symmetric functions to analyse the fractional level $\widehat{\mathfrak{sl}}(2)$ models. Read More

Background: Measurements of forward exclusive meson production at different squared four-momenta of the exchanged virtual photon, $Q^2$, and at different four-momentum transfer, t, can be used to probe QCD's transition from meson-nucleon degrees of freedom at long distances to quark-gluon degrees of freedom at short scales. Ratios of separated response functions in $\pi^-$ and $\pi^+$ electroproduction are particularly informative. The ratio for transverse photons may allow this transition to be more easily observed, while the ratio for longitudinal photons provides a crucial verification of the assumed pole dominance, needed for reliable extraction of the pion form factor from electroproduction data. Read More

2014Nov
Authors: O. Hen, M. Sargsian, L. B. Weinstein, E. Piasetzky, H. Hakobyan, D. W. Higinbotham, M. Braverman, W. K. Brooks, S. Gilad, K. P. Adhikari, J. Arrington, G. Asryan, H. Avakian, J. Ball, N. A. Baltzell, M. Battaglieri, A. Beck, S. May-Tal Beck, I. Bedlinskiy, W. Bertozzi, A. Biselli, V. D. Burkert, T. Cao, D. S. Carman, A. Celentano, S. Chandavar, L. Colaneri, P. L. Cole, V. Crede, A. DAngelo, R. De Vita, A. Deur, C. Djalali, D. Doughty, M. Dugger, R. Dupre, H. Egiyan, A. El Alaoui, L. El Fassi, L. Elouadrhiri, G. Fedotov, S. Fegan, T. Forest, B. Garillon, M. Garcon, N. Gevorgyan, Y. Ghandilyan, G. P. Gilfoyle, F. X. Girod, J. T. Goetz, R. W. Gothe, K. A. Griffioen, M. Guidal, L. Guo, K. Hafidi, C. Hanretty, M. Hattawy, K. Hicks, M. Holtrop, C. E. Hyde, Y. Ilieva, D. G. Ireland, B. I. Ishkanov, E. L. Isupov, H. Jiang, H. S. Jo, K. Joo, D. Keller, M. Khandaker, A. Kim, W. Kim, F. J. Klein, S. Koirala, I. Korover, S. E. Kuhn, V. Kubarovsky, P. Lenisa, W. I. Levine, K. Livingston, M. Lowry, H. Y. Lu, I. J. D. MacGregor, N. Markov, M. Mayer, B. McKinnon, T. Mineeva, V. Mokeev, A. Movsisyan, C. Munoz Camacho, B. Mustapha, P. Nadel-Turonski, S. Niccolai, G. Niculescu, I. Niculescu, M. Osipenko, L. L. Pappalardo, R. Paremuzyan, K. Park, E. Pasyuk, W. Phelps, S. Pisano, O. Pogorelko, J. W. Price, S. Procureur, Y. Prok, D. Protopopescu, A. J. R. Puckett, D. Rimal, M. Ripani, B. G. Ritchie, A. Rizzo, G. Rosner, P. Rossi, P. Roy, F. Sabatie, D. Schott, R. A. Schumacher, Y. G. Sharabian, G. D. Smith, R. Shneor, D. Sokhan, S. S. Stepanyan, S. Stepanyan, P. Stoler, S. Strauch, V. Sytnik, M. Taiuti, S. Tkachenko, M. Ungaro, A. V. Vlassov, E. Voutier, D. Watts, N. K. Walford, X. Wei, M. H. Wood, S. A. Wood, N. Zachariou, L. Zana, Z. W. Zhao, X. Zheng, I. Zonta

The atomic nucleus is composed of two different kinds of fermions, protons and neutrons. If the protons and neutrons did not interact, the Pauli exclusion principle would force the majority fermions (usually neutrons) to have a higher average momentum. Our high-energy electron scattering measurements using 12C, 27Al, 56Fe and 208Pb targets show that, even in heavy neutron-rich nuclei, short-range interactions between the fermions form correlated high-momentum neutron-proton pairs. Read More

Highly non-linear, chaotic or near chaotic, dynamic models are important in fields such as ecology and epidemiology: for example, pest species and diseases often display highly non-linear dynamics. However, such models are problematic from the point of view of statistical inference. The defining feature of chaotic and near chaotic systems is extreme sensitivity to small changes in system states and parameters, and this can interfere with inference. Read More

We study a family of non-C2-cofinite vertex operator algebras, called the singlet vertex operator algebras, and connect several important concepts in the theory of vertex operator algebras, quantum modular forms, and modular tensor categories. More precisely, starting from explicit formulae for characters of modules over the singlet vertex operator algebra, which can be expressed in terms of false theta functions and their derivatives, we first deform these characters by using a complex parameter {\epsilon}. We then apply modular trans- formation properties of regularised partial theta functions to study asymptotic behaviour of regularised characters of irreducible modules and compute their regularised quantum dimensions. Read More

2014Sep
Authors: Qweak Collaboration, T. Allison, M. Anderson, D. Androic, D. S. Armstrong, A. Asaturyan, T. D. Averett, R. Averill, J. Balewski, J. Beaufait, R. S. Beminiwattha, J. Benesch, F. Benmokhtar, J. Bessuille, J. Birchall, E. Bonnell, J. Bowman, P. Brindza, D. B. Brown, R. D. Carlini, G. D. Cates, B. Cavness, G. Clark, J. C. Cornejo, S. Covrig Dusa, M. M. Dalton, C. A. Davis, D. C. Dean, W. Deconinck, J. Diefenbach, K. Dow, J. F. Dowd, J. A. Dunne, D. Dutta, W. S. Duvall, J. R. Echols, M. Elaasar, W. R. Falk, K. D. Finelli, J. M. Finn, D. Gaskell, M. T. W. Gericke, J. Grames, V. M. Gray, K. Grimm, F. Guo, J. Hansknecht, D. J. Harrison, E. Henderson, J. R. Hoskins, E. Ihloff, K. Johnston, D. Jones, M. Jones, R. Jones, M. Kargiantoulakis, J. Kelsey, N. Khan, P. M. King, E. Korkmaz, S. Kowalski, A. Kubera, J. Leacock, J. P. Leckey, A. R. Lee, J. H. Lee, L. Lee, Y. Liang, S. MacEwan, D. Mack, J. A. Magee, R. Mahurin, J. Mammei, J. W. Martin, A. McCreary, M. H. McDonald, M. J. McHugh, P. Medeiros, D. Meekins, J. Mei, R. Michaels, A. Micherdzinska, A. Mkrtchyan, H. Mkrtchyan, N. Morgan, J. Musson, K. E. Mesick, A. Narayan, L. Z. Ndukum, V. Nelyubin, Nuruzzaman, W. T. H. van Oers, A. K. Opper, S. A. Page, J. Pan, K. D. Paschke, S. K. Phillips, M. L. Pitt, M. Poelker, J. F. Rajotte, W. D. Ramsay, W. R. Roberts, J. Roche, P. W. Rose, B. Sawatzky, T. Seva, M. H. Shabestari, R. Silwal, N. Simicevic, G. R. Smith, S. Sobczynski, P. Solvignon, D. T. Spayde, B. Stokes, D. W. Storey, A. Subedi, R. Subedi, R. Suleiman, V. Tadevosyan, W. A. Tobias, V. Tvaskis, E. Urban, B. Waidyawansa, P. Wang, S. P. Wells, S. A. Wood, S. Yang, S. Zhamkochyan, R. B. Zielinski

The Jefferson Lab Q_weak experiment determined the weak charge of the proton by measuring the parity-violating elastic scattering asymmetry of longitudinally polarized electrons from an unpolarized liquid hydrogen target at small momentum transfer. A custom apparatus was designed for this experiment to meet the technical challenges presented by the smallest and most precise ${\vec{e}}$p asymmetry ever measured. Technical milestones were achieved at Jefferson Lab in target power, beam current, beam helicity reversal rate, polarimetry, detected rates, and control of helicity-correlated beam properties. Read More

In this note, a deep connection between free field realisations of conformal field theories and symmetric polynomials is presented. We give a brief introduction into the necessary prerequisites of both free field realisations and symmetric polynomials, in particular Jack symmetric polynomials. Then we combine these two fields to classify the irreducible representations of the minimal model vertex operator algebras as an illuminating example of the power of these methods. Read More

A proposal approved by the Jefferson Lab PAC to study semi-inclusive deep inelastic scattering (DIS) off the deuteron, tagged with high momentum recoiling protons or neutrons emitted at large angle relative to the momentum transfer. This experiment aims at studying the virtuality dependence of the bound nucleon structure function as a possible cause to the EMC effect and the EMC-SRC correlations. The experiment was approved in 2011 for a total run time of 40 days. Read More

In rational conformal field theory, the Verlinde formula computes the fusion coefficients from the modular S-transformations of the characters of the chiral algebra's representations. Generalising this formula to logarithmic models has proven rather difficult for a variety of reasons. Here, a recently proposed formalism (arXiv:1303. Read More

Motivated by Wakimoto free field realisations, the bosonic ghost system of central charge $c=2$ is studied using a recently proposed formalism for logarithmic conformal field theories. This formalism addresses the modular properties of the theory with the aim being to determine the (Grothendieck) fusion coefficients from a variant of the Verlinde formula. The key insight, in the case of bosonic ghosts, is to introduce a family of parabolic Verma modules which dominate the spectrum of the theory. Read More

The interpretation of the signals detected by high precision experiments aimed at measuring neutrino oscillations requires an accurate description of the neutrino-nucleus cross sections. One of the key element of the analysis is the treatment of nuclear effects, which is one of the main sources of systematics for accelerator based experiments such as the Long Baseline Neutrino Experiment (LBNE). A considerable effort is currently being made to develop theoretical models capable of providing a fully quantitative description of the neutrino-nucleus cross sections in the kinematical regime relevant to LBNE. Read More

2014Jun
Authors: L. Tang1, C. Chen2, T. Gogami3, D. Kawama4, Y. Han5, L. Yuan6, A. Matsumura7, Y. Okayasu8, T. Seva9, V. M. Rodriguez10, P. Baturin11, A. Acha12, P. Achenbach13, A. Ahmidouch14, I. Albayrak15, D. Androic16, A. Asaturyan17, R. Asaturyan18, O. Ates19, R. Badui20, O. K. Baker21, F. Benmokhtar22, W. Boeglin23, J. Bono24, P. Bosted25, E. Brash26, P. Carter27, R. Carlini28, A. Chiba29, M. E. Christy30, L. Cole31, M. M. Dalton32, S. Danagoulian33, A. Daniel34, R. De Leo35, V. Dharmawardane36, D. Doi37, K. Egiyan38, M. Elaasar39, R. Ent40, H. Fenker41, Y. Fujii42, M. Furic43, M. Gabrielyan44, L. Gan45, F. Garibaldi46, D. Gaskell47, A. Gasparian48, E. F. Gibson49, P. Gueye50, O. Hashimoto51, D. Honda52, T. Horn53, B. Hu54, Ed V. Hungerford55, C. Jayalath56, M. Jones57, K. Johnston58, N. Kalantarians59, H. Kanda60, M. Kaneta61, F. Kato62, S. Kato63, M. Kawai64, C. Keppel65, H. Khanal66, M. Kohl67, L. Kramer68, K. J. Lan69, Y. Li70, A. Liyanage71, W. Luo72, D. Mack73, K. Maeda74, S. Malace75, A. Margaryan76, G. Marikyan77, P. Markowitz78, T. Maruta79, N. Maruyama80, V. Maxwell81, D. J. Millener82, T. Miyoshi83, A. Mkrtchyan84, H. Mkrtchyan85, T. Motoba86, S. Nagao87, S. N. Nakamura88, A. Narayan89, C. Neville90, G. Niculescu91, M. I. Niculescu92, A. Nunez93, Nuruzzaman94, H. Nomura95, K. Nonaka96, A. Ohtani97, M. Oyamada98, N. Perez99, T. Petkovic100, J. Pochodzalla101, X. Qiu102, S. Randeniya103, B. Raue104, J. Reinhold105, R. Rivera106, J. Roche107, C. Samanta108, Y. Sato109, B. Sawatzky110, E. K. Segbefia111, D. Schott112, A. Shichijo113, N. Simicevic114, G. Smith115, Y. Song116, M. Sumihama117, V. Tadevosyan118, T. Takahashi119, N. Taniya120, K. Tsukada121, V. Tvaskis122, M. Veilleux123, W. Vulcan124, S. Wells125, F. R. Wesselmann126, S. A. Wood127, T. Yamamoto128, C. Yan129, Z. Ye130, K. Yokota131, S. Zhamkochyan132, L. Zhu133
Affiliations: 1HKS - JLab E05-115 and E01-001 - Collaborations, 2HKS - JLab E05-115 and E01-001 - Collaborations, 3HKS - JLab E05-115 and E01-001 - Collaborations, 4HKS - JLab E05-115 and E01-001 - Collaborations, 5HKS - JLab E05-115 and E01-001 - Collaborations, 6HKS - JLab E05-115 and E01-001 - Collaborations, 7HKS - JLab E05-115 and E01-001 - Collaborations, 8HKS - JLab E05-115 and E01-001 - Collaborations, 9HKS - JLab E05-115 and E01-001 - Collaborations, 10HKS - JLab E05-115 and E01-001 - Collaborations, 11HKS - JLab E05-115 and E01-001 - Collaborations, 12HKS - JLab E05-115 and E01-001 - Collaborations, 13HKS - JLab E05-115 and E01-001 - Collaborations, 14HKS - JLab E05-115 and E01-001 - Collaborations, 15HKS - JLab E05-115 and E01-001 - Collaborations, 16HKS - JLab E05-115 and E01-001 - Collaborations, 17HKS - JLab E05-115 and E01-001 - Collaborations, 18HKS - JLab E05-115 and E01-001 - Collaborations, 19HKS - JLab E05-115 and E01-001 - Collaborations, 20HKS - JLab E05-115 and E01-001 - Collaborations, 21HKS - JLab E05-115 and E01-001 - Collaborations, 22HKS - JLab E05-115 and E01-001 - Collaborations, 23HKS - JLab E05-115 and E01-001 - Collaborations, 24HKS - JLab E05-115 and E01-001 - Collaborations, 25HKS - JLab E05-115 and E01-001 - Collaborations, 26HKS - JLab E05-115 and E01-001 - Collaborations, 27HKS - JLab E05-115 and E01-001 - Collaborations, 28HKS - JLab E05-115 and E01-001 - Collaborations, 29HKS - JLab E05-115 and E01-001 - Collaborations, 30HKS - JLab E05-115 and E01-001 - Collaborations, 31HKS - JLab E05-115 and E01-001 - Collaborations, 32HKS - JLab E05-115 and E01-001 - Collaborations, 33HKS - JLab E05-115 and E01-001 - Collaborations, 34HKS - JLab E05-115 and E01-001 - Collaborations, 35HKS - JLab E05-115 and E01-001 - Collaborations, 36HKS - JLab E05-115 and E01-001 - Collaborations, 37HKS - JLab E05-115 and E01-001 - Collaborations, 38HKS - JLab E05-115 and E01-001 - Collaborations, 39HKS - JLab E05-115 and E01-001 - Collaborations, 40HKS - JLab E05-115 and E01-001 - Collaborations, 41HKS - JLab E05-115 and E01-001 - Collaborations, 42HKS - JLab E05-115 and E01-001 - Collaborations, 43HKS - JLab E05-115 and E01-001 - Collaborations, 44HKS - JLab E05-115 and E01-001 - Collaborations, 45HKS - JLab E05-115 and E01-001 - Collaborations, 46HKS - JLab E05-115 and E01-001 - Collaborations, 47HKS - JLab E05-115 and E01-001 - Collaborations, 48HKS - JLab E05-115 and E01-001 - Collaborations, 49HKS - JLab E05-115 and E01-001 - Collaborations, 50HKS - JLab E05-115 and E01-001 - Collaborations, 51HKS - JLab E05-115 and E01-001 - Collaborations, 52HKS - JLab E05-115 and E01-001 - Collaborations, 53HKS - JLab E05-115 and E01-001 - Collaborations, 54HKS - JLab E05-115 and E01-001 - Collaborations, 55HKS - JLab E05-115 and E01-001 - Collaborations, 56HKS - JLab E05-115 and E01-001 - Collaborations, 57HKS - JLab E05-115 and E01-001 - Collaborations, 58HKS - JLab E05-115 and E01-001 - Collaborations, 59HKS - JLab E05-115 and E01-001 - Collaborations, 60HKS - JLab E05-115 and E01-001 - Collaborations, 61HKS - JLab E05-115 and E01-001 - Collaborations, 62HKS - JLab E05-115 and E01-001 - Collaborations, 63HKS - JLab E05-115 and E01-001 - Collaborations, 64HKS - JLab E05-115 and E01-001 - Collaborations, 65HKS - JLab E05-115 and E01-001 - Collaborations, 66HKS - JLab E05-115 and E01-001 - Collaborations, 67HKS - JLab E05-115 and E01-001 - Collaborations, 68HKS - JLab E05-115 and E01-001 - Collaborations, 69HKS - JLab E05-115 and E01-001 - Collaborations, 70HKS - JLab E05-115 and E01-001 - Collaborations, 71HKS - JLab E05-115 and E01-001 - Collaborations, 72HKS - JLab E05-115 and E01-001 - Collaborations, 73HKS - JLab E05-115 and E01-001 - Collaborations, 74HKS - JLab E05-115 and E01-001 - Collaborations, 75HKS - JLab E05-115 and E01-001 - Collaborations, 76HKS - JLab E05-115 and E01-001 - Collaborations, 77HKS - JLab E05-115 and E01-001 - Collaborations, 78HKS - JLab E05-115 and E01-001 - Collaborations, 79HKS - JLab E05-115 and E01-001 - Collaborations, 80HKS - JLab E05-115 and E01-001 - Collaborations, 81HKS - JLab E05-115 and E01-001 - Collaborations, 82HKS - JLab E05-115 and E01-001 - Collaborations, 83HKS - JLab E05-115 and E01-001 - Collaborations, 84HKS - JLab E05-115 and E01-001 - Collaborations, 85HKS - JLab E05-115 and E01-001 - Collaborations, 86HKS - JLab E05-115 and E01-001 - Collaborations, 87HKS - JLab E05-115 and E01-001 - Collaborations, 88HKS - JLab E05-115 and E01-001 - Collaborations, 89HKS - JLab E05-115 and E01-001 - Collaborations, 90HKS - JLab E05-115 and E01-001 - Collaborations, 91HKS - JLab E05-115 and E01-001 - Collaborations, 92HKS - JLab E05-115 and E01-001 - Collaborations, 93HKS - JLab E05-115 and E01-001 - Collaborations, 94HKS - JLab E05-115 and E01-001 - Collaborations, 95HKS - JLab E05-115 and E01-001 - Collaborations, 96HKS - JLab E05-115 and E01-001 - Collaborations, 97HKS - JLab E05-115 and E01-001 - Collaborations, 98HKS - JLab E05-115 and E01-001 - Collaborations, 99HKS - JLab E05-115 and E01-001 - Collaborations, 100HKS - JLab E05-115 and E01-001 - Collaborations, 101HKS - JLab E05-115 and E01-001 - Collaborations, 102HKS - JLab E05-115 and E01-001 - Collaborations, 103HKS - JLab E05-115 and E01-001 - Collaborations, 104HKS - JLab E05-115 and E01-001 - Collaborations, 105HKS - JLab E05-115 and E01-001 - Collaborations, 106HKS - JLab E05-115 and E01-001 - Collaborations, 107HKS - JLab E05-115 and E01-001 - Collaborations, 108HKS - JLab E05-115 and E01-001 - Collaborations, 109HKS - JLab E05-115 and E01-001 - Collaborations, 110HKS - JLab E05-115 and E01-001 - Collaborations, 111HKS - JLab E05-115 and E01-001 - Collaborations, 112HKS - JLab E05-115 and E01-001 - Collaborations, 113HKS - JLab E05-115 and E01-001 - Collaborations, 114HKS - JLab E05-115 and E01-001 - Collaborations, 115HKS - JLab E05-115 and E01-001 - Collaborations, 116HKS - JLab E05-115 and E01-001 - Collaborations, 117HKS - JLab E05-115 and E01-001 - Collaborations, 118HKS - JLab E05-115 and E01-001 - Collaborations, 119HKS - JLab E05-115 and E01-001 - Collaborations, 120HKS - JLab E05-115 and E01-001 - Collaborations, 121HKS - JLab E05-115 and E01-001 - Collaborations, 122HKS - JLab E05-115 and E01-001 - Collaborations, 123HKS - JLab E05-115 and E01-001 - Collaborations, 124HKS - JLab E05-115 and E01-001 - Collaborations, 125HKS - JLab E05-115 and E01-001 - Collaborations, 126HKS - JLab E05-115 and E01-001 - Collaborations, 127HKS - JLab E05-115 and E01-001 - Collaborations, 128HKS - JLab E05-115 and E01-001 - Collaborations, 129HKS - JLab E05-115 and E01-001 - Collaborations, 130HKS - JLab E05-115 and E01-001 - Collaborations, 131HKS - JLab E05-115 and E01-001 - Collaborations, 132HKS - JLab E05-115 and E01-001 - Collaborations, 133HKS - JLab E05-115 and E01-001 - Collaborations

Since the pioneering experiment, E89-009 studying hypernuclear spectroscopy using the $(e,e^{\prime}K^+)$ reaction was completed, two additional experiments, E01-011 and E05-115, were performed at Jefferson Lab. These later experiments used a modified experimental design, the "tilt method", to dramatically suppress the large electromagnetic background, and allowed for a substantial increase in luminosity. Additionally, a new kaon spectrometer, HKS (E01-011), a new electron spectrometer, HES, and a new splitting magnet were added to produce precision, high-resolution hypernuclear spectroscopy. Read More

2014Apr
Affiliations: 1The Jefferson Lab Fpi Collaboration, 2The Jefferson Lab Fpi Collaboration, 3The Jefferson Lab Fpi Collaboration, 4The Jefferson Lab Fpi Collaboration, 5The Jefferson Lab Fpi Collaboration, 6The Jefferson Lab Fpi Collaboration, 7The Jefferson Lab Fpi Collaboration, 8The Jefferson Lab Fpi Collaboration, 9The Jefferson Lab Fpi Collaboration, 10The Jefferson Lab Fpi Collaboration, 11The Jefferson Lab Fpi Collaboration, 12The Jefferson Lab Fpi Collaboration, 13The Jefferson Lab Fpi Collaboration, 14The Jefferson Lab Fpi Collaboration, 15The Jefferson Lab Fpi Collaboration, 16The Jefferson Lab Fpi Collaboration, 17The Jefferson Lab Fpi Collaboration, 18The Jefferson Lab Fpi Collaboration, 19The Jefferson Lab Fpi Collaboration, 20The Jefferson Lab Fpi Collaboration, 21The Jefferson Lab Fpi Collaboration, 22The Jefferson Lab Fpi Collaboration, 23The Jefferson Lab Fpi Collaboration, 24The Jefferson Lab Fpi Collaboration, 25The Jefferson Lab Fpi Collaboration, 26The Jefferson Lab Fpi Collaboration, 27The Jefferson Lab Fpi Collaboration, 28The Jefferson Lab Fpi Collaboration, 29The Jefferson Lab Fpi Collaboration, 30The Jefferson Lab Fpi Collaboration, 31The Jefferson Lab Fpi Collaboration, 32The Jefferson Lab Fpi Collaboration, 33The Jefferson Lab Fpi Collaboration, 34The Jefferson Lab Fpi Collaboration, 35The Jefferson Lab Fpi Collaboration, 36The Jefferson Lab Fpi Collaboration, 37The Jefferson Lab Fpi Collaboration, 38The Jefferson Lab Fpi Collaboration, 39The Jefferson Lab Fpi Collaboration, 40The Jefferson Lab Fpi Collaboration, 41The Jefferson Lab Fpi Collaboration, 42The Jefferson Lab Fpi Collaboration, 43The Jefferson Lab Fpi Collaboration, 44The Jefferson Lab Fpi Collaboration, 45The Jefferson Lab Fpi Collaboration, 46The Jefferson Lab Fpi Collaboration, 47The Jefferson Lab Fpi Collaboration, 48The Jefferson Lab Fpi Collaboration, 49The Jefferson Lab Fpi Collaboration, 50The Jefferson Lab Fpi Collaboration, 51The Jefferson Lab Fpi Collaboration, 52The Jefferson Lab Fpi Collaboration, 53The Jefferson Lab Fpi Collaboration, 54The Jefferson Lab Fpi Collaboration, 55The Jefferson Lab Fpi Collaboration, 56The Jefferson Lab Fpi Collaboration, 57The Jefferson Lab Fpi Collaboration, 58The Jefferson Lab Fpi Collaboration, 59The Jefferson Lab Fpi Collaboration, 60The Jefferson Lab Fpi Collaboration, 61The Jefferson Lab Fpi Collaboration, 62The Jefferson Lab Fpi Collaboration, 63The Jefferson Lab Fpi Collaboration, 64The Jefferson Lab Fpi Collaboration, 65The Jefferson Lab Fpi Collaboration, 66The Jefferson Lab Fpi Collaboration, 67The Jefferson Lab Fpi Collaboration, 68The Jefferson Lab Fpi Collaboration, 69The Jefferson Lab Fpi Collaboration, 70The Jefferson Lab Fpi Collaboration, 71The Jefferson Lab Fpi Collaboration, 72The Jefferson Lab Fpi Collaboration, 73The Jefferson Lab Fpi Collaboration, 74The Jefferson Lab Fpi Collaboration, 75The Jefferson Lab Fpi Collaboration, 76The Jefferson Lab Fpi Collaboration, 77The Jefferson Lab Fpi Collaboration, 78The Jefferson Lab Fpi Collaboration, 79The Jefferson Lab Fpi Collaboration, 80The Jefferson Lab Fpi Collaboration, 81The Jefferson Lab Fpi Collaboration, 82The Jefferson Lab Fpi Collaboration, 83The Jefferson Lab Fpi Collaboration, 84The Jefferson Lab Fpi Collaboration, 85The Jefferson Lab Fpi Collaboration, 86The Jefferson Lab Fpi Collaboration, 87The Jefferson Lab Fpi Collaboration, 88The Jefferson Lab Fpi Collaboration

The study of exclusive $\pi^{\pm}$ electroproduction on the nucleon, including separation of the various structure functions, is of interest for a number of reasons. The ratio $R_L=\sigma_L^{\pi^-}/\sigma_L^{\pi^+}$ is sensitive to isoscalar contamination to the dominant isovector pion exchange amplitude, which is the basis for the determination of the charged pion form factor from electroproduction data. A change in the value of $R_T=\sigma_T^{\pi^-}/\sigma_T^{\pi^+}$ from unity at small $-t$, to 1/4 at large $-t$, would suggest a transition from coupling to a (virtual) pion to coupling to individual quarks. Read More

2014Jan

We studied simultaneously the 4He(e,e'p), 4He(e,e'pp), and 4He(e,e'pn) reactions at Q^2=2 [GeV/c]2 and x_B>1, for a (e,e'p) missing-momentum range of 400 to 830 MeV/c. The knocked-out proton was detected in coincidence with a proton or neutron recoiling almost back to back to the missing momentum, leaving the residual A=2 system at low excitation energy. These data were used to identify two-nucleon short-range correlated pairs and to deduce their isospin structure as a function of missing momentum in a region where the nucleon-nucleon force is expected to change from predominantly tensor to repulsive. Read More

A subset of results from the recently completed Jefferson Lab Qweak experiment are reported. This experiment, sensitive to physics beyond the Standard Model, exploits the small parity-violating asymmetry in elastic ep scattering to provide the first determination of the protons weak charge Qweak(p). The experiment employed a 180 uA longitudinally polarized 1. Read More

The $(p_+,p_-)$ singlet algebra is a vertex operator algebra that is strongly generated by a Virasoro field of central charge $1-6(p_+-p_-)^2/p_+p_-$ and a single Virasoro primary field of conformal weight $(2p_+-1)(2p_--1)$. Here, the modular properties of the characters of the uncountably many simple modules of each singlet algebra are investigated and the results used as the input to a continuous analogue of the Verlinde formula to obtain the "fusion rules" of the singlet modules. The effect of the failure of fusion to be exact in general is studied at the level of Verlinde products and the rules derived are lifted to the $(p_+,p_-)$ triplet algebras by regarding these algebras as simple current extensions of their singlet cousins. Read More

The Qweak experiment has measured the parity-violating asymmetry in polarized e-p elastic scattering at Q^2 = 0.025(GeV/c)^2, employing 145 microamps of 89% longitudinally polarized electrons on a 34.4cm long liquid hydrogen target at Jefferson Lab. Read More

Aerogel and water Cerenkov detectors were employed to tag kaons for a lambda hypernuclear spectroscopic experiment which used the (e,e'K+) reaction in experimental Hall C at Jefferson Lab (JLab E05-115). Fringe fields from the kaon spectrometer magnet yielded ~5 Gauss at the photomultiplier tubes (PMT) for these detectors which could not be easily shielded. As this field results in a lowered kaon detection efficiency, we implemented a bucking coil on each photomultiplier tubes to actively cancel this magnetic field, thus maximizing kaon detection efficiency. Read More

One of the best understood families of logarithmic conformal field theories is that consisting of the (1,p) models (p = 2, 3, ... Read More

The extended W-algebra of type sl_2 at positive rational level, denoted by M_{p_+,p_-}, is a vertex operator algebra that was originally proposed in [1]. This vertex operator algebra is an extension of the minimal model vertex operator algebra and plays the role of symmetry algebra for certain logarithmic conformal field theories. We give a construction of M_{p_+,p_-} in terms of screening operators and use this construction to prove that M_{p_+,p_-} satisfies Zhu's c_2-cofiniteness condition, calculate the structure of the zero mode algebra (also known as Zhu's algebra) and classify all simple M_{p_+,p_-}-modules. Read More

The five-fold differential cross section for the 12C(e,e'p)11B reaction was determined over a missing momentum range of 200-400 MeV/c, in a kinematics regime with Bjorken x > 1 and Q2 = 2.0 (GeV/c)2. A comparison of the results and theoretical models and previous lower missing momentum data is shown. Read More

The parity-violating asymmetry arising from inelastic electron-nucleon scattering at backward angle (~95 degrees) near the Delta(1232) resonance has been measured using a hydrogen target. From this asymmetry, we extracted the axial transition form factor G^A_{N\Delta}, a function of the axial Adler form factors C^A_i. Though G^A_{N\Delta} has been previously studied using charged current reactions, this is the first measurement of the weak neutral current excitation of the Delta using a proton target. Read More

The lifetime of a Lambda particle embedded in a nucleus (hypernucleus) decreases from that of free Lambda decay due to the opening of the Lambda N to NN weak decay channel. However, it is generally believed that the lifetime of a hypernucleus attains a constant value (saturation) for medium to heavy hypernuclear masses, yet this hypothesis has been difficult to verify. The present paper reports a direct measurement of the lifetime of medium-heavy hypernuclei produced with a photon-beam from Fe, Cu, Ag, and Bi targets. Read More

2012Jul
Affiliations: 1HKS, 2HKS, 3HKS, 4HKS, 5HKS, 6HKS, 7HKS, 8HKS, 9HKS, 10HKS, 11HKS, 12HKS, 13HKS, 14HKS, 15HKS, 16HKS, 17HKS, 18HKS, 19HKS, 20HKS, 21HKS, 22HKS, 23HKS, 24HKS, 25HKS, 26HKS, 27HKS, 28HKS, 29HKS, 30HKS, 31HKS, 32HKS, 33HKS, 34HKS, 35HKS, 36HKS, 37HKS, 38HKS, 39HKS, 40HKS, 41HKS, 42HKS, 43HKS, 44HKS, 45HKS, 46HKS, 47HKS, 48HKS, 49HKS, 50HKS, 51HKS, 52HKS, 53HKS, 54HKS, 55HKS, 56HKS, 57HKS, 58HKS, 59HKS, 60HKS, 61HKS, 62HKS, 63HKS, 64HKS, 65HKS, 66HKS, 67HKS, 68HKS, 69HKS, 70HKS, 71HKS, 72HKS, 73HKS, 74HKS, 75HKS, 76HKS, 77HKS, 78HKS, 79HKS, 80HKS, 81HKS, 82HKS, 83HKS, 84HKS, 85HKS, 86HKS, 87HKS, 88HKS, 89HKS, 90HKS, 91HKS, 92HKS, 93HKS

An experiment with a newly developed high-resolution kaon spectrometer (HKS) and a scattered electron spectrometer with a novel configuration was performed in Hall C at Jefferson Lab (JLab). The ground state of a neutron-rich hypernucleus, He 7 Lambda, was observed for the first time with the (e,e'K+) reaction with an energy resolution of ~0.6 MeV. Read More

The electromagnetic calorimeters of the various magnetic spectrometers in Hall C at Jefferson Lab are presented. For the existing HMS and SOS spectrometers design considerations, relevant construction information, and comparisons of simulated and experimental results are included. The energy resolution of the HMS and SOS calorimeters is better than $\sigma/E \sim 6%/\sqrt E $, and pion/electron ($\pi/e$) separation of about 100:1 has been achieved in energy range 1 -- 5 GeV. Read More

We propose a new precision measurement of parity-violating electron scattering on the proton at very low Q^2 and forward angles to challenge predictions of the Standard Model and search for new physics. A unique opportunity exists to carry out the first precision measurement of the proton's weak charge, $Q_W =1 - 4\sin^2\theta_W$. A 2200 hour measurement of the parity violating asymmetry in elastic ep scattering at Q^2=0. Read More

We review the definition of bulk and boundary conformal field theory in a way suited for logarithmic conformal field theory. The notion of a maximal bulk theory which can be non-degenerately joined to a boundary theory is defined. The purpose of this construction is to obtain the more complicated bulk theories from simpler boundary theories. Read More

We study the braided monoidal structure that the fusion product induces on the abelian category $\mathcal{W}_p$-mod, the category of representations of the triplet $W$-algebra $\mathcal{W}_p$. The $\mathcal{W}_p$-algebras are a family of vertex operator algebras that form the simplest known examples of symmetry algebras of logarithmic conformal field theories. We formalise the methods for computing fusion products, developed by Nahm, Gaberdiel and Kausch, that are widely used in the physics literature and illustrate a systematic approach to calculating fusion products in non-semi-simple representation categories. Read More