S. Su - University of Arizona

S. Su
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Name
S. Su
Affiliation
University of Arizona
City
Tucson
Country
United States

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High Energy Physics - Phenomenology (15)
 
Quantum Physics (8)
 
High Energy Physics - Experiment (7)
 
Physics - Materials Science (5)
 
Computer Science - Computer Vision and Pattern Recognition (4)
 
Physics - Atomic Physics (4)
 
Cosmology and Nongalactic Astrophysics (3)
 
Computer Science - Learning (3)
 
Computer Science - Cryptography and Security (3)
 
Physics - Mesoscopic Systems and Quantum Hall Effect (2)
 
Computer Science - Information Theory (1)
 
Mathematics - Information Theory (1)
 
Instrumentation and Methods for Astrophysics (1)
 
Quantitative Biology - Genomics (1)
 
Physics - Accelerator Physics (1)
 
Astrophysics of Galaxies (1)
 
Computer Science - Networking and Internet Architecture (1)
 
Computer Science - Information Retrieval (1)
 
Computer Science - Computer Science and Game Theory (1)
 
High Energy Physics - Theory (1)
 
Physics - Strongly Correlated Electrons (1)

Publications Authored By S. Su

This paper studies a problem of inverse visual path planning: creating a visual scene from a first person action. Our conjecture is that the spatial arrangement of a first person visual scene is deployed to afford an action, and therefore, the action can be inversely used to synthesize a new scene such that the action is feasible. As a proof-of-concept, we focus on linking visual experiences induced by walking. Read More

Network latencies have become increasingly important for the performance of web servers and cloud computing platforms. Identifying network-related tail latencies and reasoning about their potential causes is especially important to gauge application run-time in online data-intensive applications, where the 99th percentile latency of individual operations can significantly affect the the overall latency of requests. This paper deconstructs the "tail at scale" effect across TCP-IP, UDP-IP, and RDMA network protocols. Read More

We report the single-crystal growth and the fundamental magnetic and thermodynamic properties of a rare-earth triangular lattice antiferromagnet CeCd$_3$As$_3$. In this rare-earth antiferromagnet, the Ce local moments form a perfect triangular lattice. Due to the spin-orbital-entangled nature of the Ce local moments, the compound exhibits extremely anisotropic antiferromagnetic couplings along the c direction and in the ab plane respectively. Read More

The dark matter (DM) blind spots in the Minimal Supersymmetric Standard Model (MSSM) refer to the parameter regions where the couplings of the DM particles to the $Z$-boson or the Higgs boson are almost zero, leading to vanishingly small signals for the DM direct detections. In this paper, we carry out comprehensive analyses for the DM searches under the blind-spot scenarios in MSSM. Guided by the requirement of acceptable DM relic abundance, we explore the complementary coverage for the theory parameters at the LHC, the projection for the future underground DM direct searches, and the indirect searches from the relic DM annihilation into photons and neutrinos. Read More

This paper presents a method to predict the future movements (location and gaze direction) of basketball players as a whole from their first person videos. The predicted behaviors reflect an individual physical space that affords to take the next actions while conforming to social behaviors by engaging to joint attention. Our key innovation is to use the 3D reconstruction of multiple first person cameras to automatically annotate each other's the visual semantics of social configurations. Read More

Placing graphene on SnS2 results in significant charge transfer, on the order of 10^13/cm^2, from the graphene to the SnS2, and the charge transfer results in a negative Schottky barrier contact for electron injection from the graphene into the SnS2 conduction band. However, due to the s-px,y composition of the SnS2 conduction band, the coupling between the SnS2 and the graphene is relatively weak. A third layer, HfSe2, placed between the SnS2 and the graphene, serves as a matrix element matching layer, since it has strong coupling to both the graphene and the SnS2. Read More

Motion blur from camera shake is a major problem in videos captured by hand-held devices. Unlike single-image deblurring, video-based approaches can take advantage of the abundant information that exists across neighboring frames. As a result the best performing methods rely on aligning nearby frames. Read More

Encryption is a vital tool of information technology protecting our data in the world with ubiquitous computers. While photons are regarded as ideal information carriers, it is a must to implement such data protection on all-optical storage. However, the intrinsic risk of data breaches in existing schemes of photonic memory was never addressed. Read More

2016Oct
Authors: D. de Florian1, C. Grojean2, F. Maltoni3, C. Mariotti4, A. Nikitenko5, M. Pieri6, P. Savard7, M. Schumacher8, R. Tanaka9, R. Aggleton10, M. Ahmad11, B. Allanach12, C. Anastasiou13, W. Astill14, S. Badger15, M. Badziak16, J. Baglio17, E. Bagnaschi18, A. Ballestrero19, A. Banfi20, D. Barducci21, M. Beckingham22, C. Becot23, G. Bélanger24, J. Bellm25, N. Belyaev26, F. U. Bernlochner27, C. Beskidt28, A. Biekötter29, F. Bishara30, W. Bizon31, N. E. Bomark32, M. Bonvini33, S. Borowka34, V. Bortolotto35, S. Boselli36, F. J. Botella37, R. Boughezal38, G. C. Branco39, J. Brehmer40, L. Brenner41, S. Bressler42, I. Brivio43, A. Broggio44, H. Brun45, G. Buchalla46, C. D. Burgard47, A. Calandri48, L. Caminada49, R. Caminal Armadans50, F. Campanario51, J. Campbell52, F. Caola53, C. M. Carloni Calame54, S. Carrazza55, A. Carvalho56, M. Casolino57, O. Cata58, A. Celis59, F. Cerutti60, N. Chanon61, M. Chen62, X. Chen63, B. Chokoufé Nejad64, N. Christensen65, M. Ciuchini66, R. Contino67, T. Corbett68, D. Curtin69, M. Dall'Osso70, A. David71, S. Dawson72, J. de Blas73, W. de Boer74, P. de Castro Manzano75, C. Degrande76, R. L. Delgado77, F. Demartin78, A. Denner79, B. Di Micco80, R. Di Nardo81, S. Dittmaier82, A. Dobado83, T. Dorigo84, F. A. Dreyer85, M. Dührssen86, C. Duhr87, F. Dulat88, K. Ecker89, K. Ellis90, U. Ellwanger91, C. Englert92, D. Espriu93, A. Falkowski94, L. Fayard95, R. Feger96, G. Ferrera97, A. Ferroglia98, N. Fidanza99, T. Figy100, M. Flechl101, D. Fontes102, S. Forte103, P. Francavilla104, E. Franco105, R. Frederix106, A. Freitas107, F. F. Freitas108, F. Frensch109, S. Frixione110, B. Fuks111, E. Furlan112, S. Gadatsch113, J. Gao114, Y. Gao115, M. V. Garzelli116, T. Gehrmann117, R. Gerosa118, M. Ghezzi119, D. Ghosh120, S. Gieseke121, D. Gillberg122, G. F. Giudice123, E. W. N. Glover124, F. Goertz125, D. Gonçalves126, J. Gonzalez-Fraile127, M. Gorbahn128, S. Gori129, C. A. Gottardo130, M. Gouzevitch131, P. Govoni132, D. Gray133, M. Grazzini134, N. Greiner135, A. Greljo136, J. Grigo137, A. V. Gritsan138, R. Gröber139, S. Guindon140, H. E. Haber141, C. Han142, T. Han143, R. Harlander144, M. A. Harrendorf145, H. B. Hartanto146, C. Hays147, S. Heinemeyer148, G. Heinrich149, M. Herrero150, F. Herzog151, B. Hespel152, V. Hirschi153, S. Hoeche154, S. Honeywell155, S. J. Huber156, C. Hugonie157, J. Huston158, A. Ilnicka159, G. Isidori160, B. Jäger161, M. Jaquier162, S. P. Jones163, A. Juste164, S. Kallweit165, A. Kaluza166, A. Kardos167, A. Karlberg168, Z. Kassabov169, N. Kauer170, D. I. Kazakov171, M. Kerner172, W. Kilian173, F. Kling174, K. Köneke175, R. Kogler176, R. Konoplich177, S. Kortner178, S. Kraml179, C. Krause180, F. Krauss181, M. Krawczyk182, A. Kulesza183, S. Kuttimalai184, R. Lane185, A. Lazopoulos186, G. Lee187, P. Lenzi188, I. M. Lewis189, Y. Li190, S. Liebler191, J. Lindert192, X. Liu193, Z. Liu194, F. J. Llanes-Estrada195, H. E. Logan196, D. Lopez-Val197, I. Low198, G. Luisoni199, P. Maierhöfer200, E. Maina201, B. Mansoulié202, H. Mantler203, M. Mantoani204, A. C. Marini205, V. I. Martinez Outschoorn206, S. Marzani207, D. Marzocca208, A. Massironi209, K. Mawatari210, J. Mazzitelli211, A. McCarn212, B. Mellado213, K. Melnikov214, S. B. Menari215, L. Merlo216, C. Meyer217, P. Milenovic218, K. Mimasu219, S. Mishima220, B. Mistlberger221, S. -O. Moch222, A. Mohammadi223, P. F. Monni224, G. Montagna225, M. Moreno Llácer226, N. Moretti227, S. Moretti228, L. Motyka229, A. Mück230, M. Mühlleitner231, S. Munir232, P. Musella233, P. Nadolsky234, D. Napoletano235, M. Nebot236, C. Neu237, M. Neubert238, R. Nevzorov239, O. Nicrosini240, J. Nielsen241, K. Nikolopoulos242, J. M. No243, C. O'Brien244, T. Ohl245, C. Oleari246, T. Orimoto247, D. Pagani248, C. E. Pandini249, A. Papaefstathiou250, A. S. Papanastasiou251, G. Passarino252, B. D. Pecjak253, M. Pelliccioni254, G. Perez255, L. Perrozzi256, F. Petriello257, G. Petrucciani258, E. Pianori259, F. Piccinini260, M. Pierini261, A. Pilkington262, S. Plätzer263, T. Plehn264, R. Podskubka265, C. T. Potter266, S. Pozzorini267, K. Prokofiev268, A. Pukhov269, I. Puljak270, M. Queitsch-Maitland271, J. Quevillon272, D. Rathlev273, M. Rauch274, E. Re275, M. N. Rebelo276, D. Rebuzzi277, L. Reina278, C. Reuschle279, J. Reuter280, M. Riembau281, F. Riva282, A. Rizzi283, T. Robens284, R. Röntsch285, J. Rojo286, J. C. Romão287, N. Rompotis288, J. Roskes289, R. Roth290, G. P. Salam291, R. Salerno292, R. Santos293, V. Sanz294, J. J. Sanz-Cillero295, H. Sargsyan296, U. Sarica297, P. Schichtel298, J. Schlenk299, T. Schmidt300, C. Schmitt301, M. Schönherr302, U. Schubert303, M. Schulze304, S. Sekula305, M. Sekulla306, E. Shabalina307, H. S. Shao308, J. Shelton309, C. H. Shepherd-Themistocleous310, S. Y. Shim311, F. Siegert312, A. Signer313, J. P. Silva314, L. Silvestrini315, M. Sjodahl316, P. Slavich317, M. Slawinska318, L. Soffi319, M. Spannowsky320, C. Speckner321, D. M. Sperka322, M. Spira323, O. Stål324, F. Staub325, T. Stebel326, T. Stefaniak327, M. Steinhauser328, I. W. Stewart329, M. J. Strassler330, J. Streicher331, D. M. Strom332, S. Su333, X. Sun334, F. J. Tackmann335, K. Tackmann336, A. M. Teixeira337, R. Teixeira de Lima338, V. Theeuwes339, R. Thorne340, D. Tommasini341, P. Torrielli342, M. Tosi343, F. Tramontano344, Z. Trócsányi345, M. Trott346, I. Tsinikos347, M. Ubiali348, P. Vanlaer349, W. Verkerke350, A. Vicini351, L. Viliani352, E. Vryonidou353, D. Wackeroth354, C. E. M. Wagner355, J. Wang356, S. Wayand357, G. Weiglein358, C. Weiss359, M. Wiesemann360, C. Williams361, J. Winter362, D. Winterbottom363, R. Wolf364, M. Xiao365, L. L. Yang366, R. Yohay367, S. P. Y. Yuen368, G. Zanderighi369, M. Zaro370, D. Zeppenfeld371, R. Ziegler372, T. Zirke373, J. Zupan374
Affiliations: 1eds., 2eds., 3eds., 4eds., 5eds., 6eds., 7eds., 8eds., 9eds., 10The LHC Higgs Cross Section Working Group, 11The LHC Higgs Cross Section Working Group, 12The LHC Higgs Cross Section Working Group, 13The LHC Higgs Cross Section Working Group, 14The LHC Higgs Cross Section Working Group, 15The LHC Higgs Cross Section Working Group, 16The LHC Higgs Cross Section Working Group, 17The LHC Higgs Cross Section Working Group, 18The LHC Higgs Cross Section Working Group, 19The LHC Higgs Cross Section Working Group, 20The LHC Higgs Cross Section Working Group, 21The LHC Higgs Cross Section Working Group, 22The LHC Higgs Cross Section Working Group, 23The LHC Higgs Cross Section Working Group, 24The LHC Higgs Cross Section Working Group, 25The LHC Higgs Cross Section Working Group, 26The LHC Higgs Cross Section Working Group, 27The LHC Higgs Cross Section Working Group, 28The LHC Higgs Cross Section Working Group, 29The LHC Higgs Cross Section Working Group, 30The LHC Higgs Cross 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This Report summarizes the results of the activities of the LHC Higgs Cross Section Working Group in the period 2014-2016. The main goal of the working group was to present the state-of-the-art of Higgs physics at the LHC, integrating all new results that have appeared in the last few years. The first part compiles the most up-to-date predictions of Higgs boson production cross sections and decay branching ratios, parton distribution functions, and off-shell Higgs boson production and interference effects. Read More

Dynamical Dark Matter (DDM) is an alternative framework for dark-matter physics in which the dark sector comprises a vast ensemble of particle species whose decay widths are balanced against their cosmological abundances. Previous studies of this framework have focused on a particular class of DDM ensembles --- motivated primarily by KK towers in theories with extra dimensions --- in which the density of states scales roughly as a polynomial of mass. In this paper, by contrast, we study the properties of a different class of DDM ensembles in which the density of states grows exponentially with mass. Read More

Fraud (swindling money or property by utilizing fictional, counterfeit, forged, or imitative things or by feigning other persons) forms its threats against public security and network security. Anti-fraud is essentially the identification of a person or thing. In this paper, the authors first propose the concept of idology - a systematic and scientific study of identifications of persons and things, and give the definitions of a symmetric identity and an asymmetric identity. Read More

A spin-orbit coupled two-dimensional (2D) Bose gas is shown to simultaneously possess quasi and true long-range order in the total and relative phase sectors, respectively. The total phase undergoes a Berenzinskii- Kosterlitz-Thouless transition to a low temperature phase with quasi long-range order, as expected for a two- dimensional quantum gas. Additionally, the relative phase undergoes an Ising-type transition building up true long-range order, which is induced by the anisotropic spin-orbit coupling. Read More

In this short paper, we propose the split-diffuse (SD) algorithm that takes the output of an existing word embedding algorithm, and distributes the data points uniformly across the visualization space. The result improves the perceivability and the interactability by the human. We apply the SD algorithm to analyze the user behavior through access logs within the cyber security domain. Read More

We propose the split-diffuse (SD) algorithm that takes the output of an existing dimension reduction algorithm, and distributes the data points uniformly across the visualization space. The result, called the topic grids, is a set of grids on various topics which are generated from the free-form text content of any domain of interest. The topic grids efficiently utilizes the visualization space to provide visual summaries for massive data. Read More

We propose the topic grids to detect anomaly and analyze the behavior based on the access log content. Content-based behavioral risk is quantified in the high dimensional space where the topics are generated from the log. The topics are being projected homogeneously into a space that is perception- and interaction-friendly to the human experts. Read More

In this paper, a two-sided matching market is considered, and a descending price algorithm based auction mechanism is proposed to determine market clearing prices. For general valuations with a intelligent choice of reverse constricted sets, we prove that the algorithm converges in a finite number of rounds. Then specializing to the rank one valuations in sponsored search markets, we provide an alternate characterization of the set of all market clearing prices, and use this to prove that the proposed algorithm yields the element-wise maximum market clearing price. Read More

Interlayer misorientation in transition metal dichalcogenides alters the interlayer distance, the electronic band structure, and the vibrational modes, but, its effect on the interlayer resistance is not known. This work analyzes the coherent interlayer resistance of misoriented 2H-MoS2 for low energy electrons and holes as a function of the misorientation angle. The electronic interlayer resistance monotonically increases with the supercell lattice constant by several orders of magnitude similar to that of misoriented bilayer graphene. Read More

In this paper, we present a novel approach to detect ground control points (GCPs) for stereo matching problem. First of all, we train a convolutional neural network (CNN) on a large stereo set, and compute the matching confidence of each pixel by using the trained CNN model. Secondly, we present a ground control points selection scheme according to the maximum matching confidence of each pixel. Read More

Higgs portal interactions provide a simple mechanism for addressing two open problems in cosmology: dark matter and the baryon asymmetry. In the latter instance, Higgs portal interactions may contain the ingredients for a strong first order electroweak phase transition as well as new CP-violating interactions as needed for electroweak baryogenesis. These interactions may also allow for a viable dark matter candidate. Read More

Large mass splittings between new scalars in two-Higgs-doublet models (2HDM) open a key avenue to search for these new states via exotic heavy Higgs decays. We discuss in detail the different search channels for these new scalars at the LHC in the presence of a sizable mass splitting, i.e. Read More

We explore a new way of producing the Rashba spin-orbit coupling (SOC) for ultracold atoms by using a two-component (spinor) atomic Bose-Einstein condensate (BEC) confined in a bilayer geometry. The SOC of the Rashba type is created if the atoms pick up a {\pi} phase after completing a cyclic transition between four combined spin-layer states composed of two spin and two layer states. The cyclic coupling of the spin-layer states is carried out by combining an intralayer Raman coupling and an interlayer laser assisted tunneling. Read More

Photon impingement is capable of liberating electrons in electronic devices and driving the electron flux from the lower chemical potential to higher chemical potential. Previous studies hinted that the thermodynamic efficiency of a nano-sized photoelectric converter at maximum power is bounded by the Curzon-Ahlborn efficiency. In this study, we apply quantum effects to design a photoelectric converter based on a three-level quantum dot (QD) interacting with fermionic baths and photons. Read More

In a heterostructure of graphene and the ferromagnetic insulator EuO, the Eu atoms induce proximity exchange and inter-valley interactions in the graphene layer. Constrained by the lattice symmetries, and guided by ab initio calculations, a model Hamiltonian is constructed that describes the low-energy bands. Band parameters such as proximity induced exchange splitting, spin orbit coupling, and inter-valley interaction are determined. Read More

In this paper, we apply a new statistical analysis technique, Mean Field approach to Bayesian Independent Component Analysis (MF-ICA), on galaxy spectral analysis. This algorithm can compress the stellar spectral library into a few Independent Components (ICs), and galaxy spectrum can be reconstructed by these ICs. Comparing to other algorithms which decompose a galaxy spectrum into a combination of several simple stellar populations, MF-ICA approach offers a large improvement in the efficiency. Read More

Cavity quantum electrodynamics (CQED) plays an elegant role of studying strong coupling between light and matter. However, a non-mechanical, direct and dynamical control of the used mirrors is still unavailable. Here we theoretically investigate a novel type of dynamically controllable cavity composed of two atomic mirrors. Read More

The geometric and electronic properties of Bi-adsorbed monolayer graphene, enriched by the strong effect of substrate, are investigated by first-principles calculations. The six-layered substrate, corrugated buffer layer, and slightly deformed monolayer graphene are all simulated. Adatom arrangements are thoroughly studied by analyzing the ground-state energies, bismuth adsorption energies, and Bi-Bi interaction energies of different adatom heights, inter-adatom distance, adsorption sites, and hexagonal positions. Read More

2015Jul
Affiliations: 1Pittsburgh U. and Tsinghua U., 2Arizona U. and Tsinghua U., 3Tsinghua U., 4Tsinghua U., 5Arizona U.

In the search for bottom squark (sbottom) in SUSY at the LHC, the common practice has been to assume a $100\%$ decay branching fraction for a given search channel. In realistic MSSM scenarios, there are often more than one significant decay modes to be present, which significantly weaken the current sbottom search limits at the LHC. On the other hand, the combination of the multiple decay modes offers alternative discovery channels for sbottom searches. Read More

Following the discovery of the Higgs boson at LHC, new large colliders are being studied by the international high-energy community to explore Higgs physics in detail and new physics beyond the Standard Model. In China, a two-stage circular collider project CEPC-SPPC is proposed, with the first stage CEPC (Circular Electron Positron Collier, a so-called Higgs factory) focused on Higgs physics, and the second stage SPPC (Super Proton-Proton Collider) focused on new physics beyond the Standard Model. This paper discusses this second stage. Read More

In the literature, few constructions of $n$-variable rotation symmetric bent functions have been presented, which either have restriction on $n$ or have algebraic degree no more than $4$. In this paper, for any even integer $n=2m\ge2$, a first systemic construction of $n$-variable rotation symmetric bent functions, with any possible algebraic degrees ranging from $2$ to $m$, is proposed. Read More

While current ATLAS and CMS measurements exclude a light charged Higgs ($m_{H^\pm}<160$ GeV) for most of the parameter region in the context of the MSSM scenarios, these bounds are significantly weakened in the Type II 2HDM once the exotic decay channel into a lighter neutral Higgs, $H^\pm \to AW/HW$, is open. In this study, we examine the possibility of a light charged Higgs produced in top decay via single top or top pair production, with the subsequent decay $H^\pm \rightarrow AW/HW$, which can reach a sizable branching fraction at low $\tan\beta$ once it is kinematically permitted. With a detailed collider analysis, we obtain exclusion and discovery bounds for the 14 TeV LHC assuming the existence of a 70 GeV neutral scalar. Read More

2015Apr
Authors: Tong Li1, Shufang Su2
Affiliations: 1Monash University, 2University of Arizona

The most common search channel for heavy neutral Higgses in models with an extension of the Standard Model Higgs sector is $A/H^0\rightarrow \tau\tau$, which becomes ineffective when new decay modes of $A/H^0$ open. In this paper, we analyzed two such channels involving charged Higgses in the final states: $A/H^0 \rightarrow W^\pm H^\mp$ and $H^0 \rightarrow H^+H^-$. With the consequent decay of $H^\pm\rightarrow \tau\nu$, we found that the limits for $\sigma\times{BR}(gg \rightarrow A/H^0 \rightarrow W^\pm H^\mp)\times {BR}(H^\pm \rightarrow \tau \nu)$ vary from 30 to 10 fb for $m_{A/H^0}$ between 300 and 1000 GeV for 95% C. Read More

Long-lived, spatially localized, and temporally oscillating nonlinear excitations are predicted by numerical simulation of coupled Gross-Pitaevskii equations. These oscillons closely resemble the time-periodic breather solutions of the sine-Gordon equation but decay slowly by radiating Bogoliubov phonons. Their time-dependent profile is closely matched with solutions of the sine-Gordon equation, which emerges as an effective field theory for the relative phase of two linearly coupled Bose fields in the weak-coupling limit. Read More

We theoretically explore atomic Bose-Einstein condensates (BECs) subject to position-dependent spin-orbit coupling (SOC). This SOC can be produced by cyclically laser coupling four internal atomic ground (or metastable) states in an environment where the detuning from resonance depends on position. The resulting spin-orbit coupled BEC phase-separates into domains, each of which contain density modulations - stripes - aligned either along the x or y direction. Read More

We propose a scheme to prepare a maximally entangled state for two Lambda-type atoms trapped in separate optical cavities coupled through an optical fiber based on the combined effect of the unitary dynamics and the dissipative process. Our work shows that the fiber loss, as well as the atomic spontaneous emission and the cavity decay, is no longer undesirable, but requisite to prepare the distributed entanglement, which is meaningful for the long distance quantum information processing tasks. Originating from an arbitrary state, the desired state could be prepared without precise time control. Read More

2014Nov
Affiliations: 1University of Arizona, 2University of Arizona, 3University of Arizona

Current searches for the top squark mostly focus on the decay channels of $\tilde{t}_1 \rightarrow t \chi_1^0$ or $\tilde{t}_1 \rightarrow b \chi_1^\pm \rightarrow bW \chi_1^0$, leading to $tt/bbWW+\not\mathrel{E}_T$ final states for top squark pair production at the LHC. In supersymmetric scenarios with light gauginos other than the neutralino lightest supersymmetric particle (LSP), different decay modes of the top squark could be dominant, which significantly weaken the current top squark search limits at the LHC. Additionally, new decay modes offer alternative discovery channels for top squark searches. Read More

We propose an adiabatic passage approach to generate two atoms three- dimensional entanglement with the help of quantum Zeno dynamics in a time- dependent interacting field. The atoms are trapped in two spatially separated cavi- ties connected by a fiber, so that the individual addressing is needless. Because the scheme is based on the resonant interaction, the time required to generate entangle- ment is greatly shortened. Read More

Photon impingement is capable of liberating electrons in semiconductors. When the electron transport is primarily governed by temperature gradients, high irreversibilities will result, thus lowering converters' efficiencies. A fundamental study in the absence of photovoltaics\cite{1} has achieved the reduction of these irreversibilities by considering entropy changes due to electron flows. Read More

Inflation predicts B-mode polarization with correlations that span superhorizon scales at recombination. In contrast, the correlations set up by causal sources, such as phase transitions or defects, necessarily vanish on superhorizon scales. Motivated by BICEP2's B-mode detection, we consider the prospects for measuring the inflationary superhorizon signature in future observations. Read More

To be paired with a lightweight digital signing scheme of which the modulus length is between 80 and 160 bits, a new non-Merkle-Damgard structure (non-MDS) hash function is proposed by the authors based on a multivariate permutation problem (MPP) and an anomalous subset product problem (ASPP) to which no subexponential time solutions are found so far. It includes an initialization algorithm and a compression algorithm, and converts a short message of n bits treated as only a block into a digest of m bits, where 80 <= m <= 232 and 80 <= m <= n <= 4096. Analysis shows that the new hash is one-way, weakly collision-free, and strongly collision-free along with a proof, and its security against existent attacks such as birthday attack and meet-in-the-middle attack gets the O(2^m) magnitude. Read More

The authors give the definition and property of a bit-pair shadow, and design the three algorithms of a public key cryptoscheme that is based on a multivariate permutation problem (MPP) and an anomalous subset product problem (ASPP) to which no subexponential time solutions are found so far, and regards a bit-pair as an operation unit. Further, demonstrate that the decryption algorithm is correct, deduce the probability that a plaintext solution is nonunique is nearly zero, dissect the running times of the three algorithms, analyze the security of the new scheme against extracting a private key from a public key and recovering a related plaintext from a ciphertext by LLL lattice basis reduction, meet-in-the-middle dichotomy, and adaptive-chosen-ciphertext approach on the assumption that an integer factorization problem, a discrete logarithm problem, and a low-density subset sum problem can be solved efficiently, and prove that new scheme using random both padding and permutation is semantically secure. Meantime, give a conversion from an ASPP to an anomalous subset sum problem (ASSP). Read More

We propose a dissipative scheme to prepare a three-dimensional entangled state for two atoms trapped in separate coupled cavities. Our work shows that both atomic spontaneous emission and cavity decay, which are two typical obstacles in unitary-dynamics-based schemes, could be utilized as resources for high-dimensional entangled state preparation without specifying initial state and controlling time precisely. Final numerical simulation with one group of experimental parameters indicates that the performance of our scheme is better than the unitary-dynamics-based scheme. Read More

Models of electroweak symmetry breaking with extended Higgs sectors are theoretically well motivated. In this study, we focus on models with a low energy spectrum containing a pair of charged scalars $H^\pm$, as well as a light scalar H and/or a pseudoscalar A. We study the $H^\pm tb$ associated production with $H^\pm \to AW/HW$, which could reach sizable branching fractions in certain parameter regions. Read More

Searches for supersymmetry at the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) have significantly constrained the parameter space associated with colored superpartners, whereas the constraints on color-singlet superpartners are considerably less severe. In this study, we investigate the dependence of slepton decay branching fractions on the nature of the lightest supersymmetric particle (LSP). In particular, in the Higgsino-like LSP scenarios, both decay branching fractions of $\tilde\ell_L$ and $\tilde\nu_\ell$ depend strongly on the sign and value of $M_1/M_2$, which has strong implications for the reach of dilepton plus MET searches for slepton pair production. Read More

Motivation: Methods are needed to test pre-defined genomic regions such as promoters for differential methylation in genome-wide association studies, where the number of samples is limited and the data have large amounts of measurement error. Results: We developed a new statistical test, the generalized integrated functional test (GIFT), which tests for regional differences in methylation based on differences in the functional relationship between methylation percent and location of the CpG sites within a region. In this method, subject-specific functional profiles are first estimated, and the average profile within groups is compared between groups using an ANOVA-like test. Read More

In this paper, we examine the strategies and prospects for distinguishing between traditional dark-matter models and models with non-minimal dark sectors --- including models of Dynamical Dark Matter (DDM) --- at hadron colliders. For concreteness, we focus on events with two hadronic jets and large missing transverse energy at the Large Hadron Collider (LHC). As we discuss, simple "bump-hunting" searches are not sufficient; probing non-minimal dark sectors typically requires an analysis of the actual shapes of the distributions of relevant kinematic variables. Read More

We study the neutralino being the Lightest Supersymmetric Particle (LSP) as a cold Dark Matter (DM) candidate with a mass less than 40 GeV in the framework of the Next-to-Minimal-Supersymmetric-Standard-Model (NMSSM). We find that with the current collider constraints from LEP, the Tevatron and the LHC, there are three types of light DM solutions consistent with the direct/indirect searches as well as the relic abundance considerations: (i) A1, H1-funnels, (ii) stau coannihilation and (iii) sbottom coannihilation. Type-(i) may take place in any theory with a light scalar (or pseudo-scalar) near the LSP pair threshold; while Type-(ii) and (iii) could occur in the framework of Minimal-Supersymmetric-Standard-Model (MSSM) as well. Read More

2014Apr
Affiliations: 1University of Arizona, 2University of Arizona, 3University of Arizona

Models of electroweak symmetry breaking with extended Higgs sectors are theoretically well motivated. In this study, we focus on the Two Higgs Doublet Model with a low energy spectrum containing scalars $H$ and a pseudoscalar $A$. We study the decays $A\rightarrow HZ$ or $H\rightarrow AZ$, which could reach sizable branching fractions in certain parameter regions. Read More