S. P. Smith - Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Hawaii, Honolulu, HI 96822, USA

S. P. Smith
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Name
S. P. Smith
Affiliation
Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Hawaii, Honolulu, HI 96822, USA
City
Honolulu
Country
United States

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Physics - Materials Science (6)
 
High Energy Astrophysical Phenomena (4)
 
High Energy Physics - Experiment (4)
 
Nonlinear Sciences - Chaotic Dynamics (4)
 
Mathematics - Algebraic Geometry (3)
 
Mathematics - Rings and Algebras (3)
 
Solar and Stellar Astrophysics (3)
 
Mathematics - Combinatorics (3)
 
Mathematics - Quantum Algebra (3)
 
Mathematical Physics (3)
 
Physics - Fluid Dynamics (3)
 
Physics - Chemical Physics (3)
 
Mathematics - Mathematical Physics (3)
 
Physics - Accelerator Physics (2)
 
Quantitative Biology - Molecular Networks (2)
 
Mathematics - Dynamical Systems (2)
 
Physics - Statistical Mechanics (2)
 
Physics - Instrumentation and Detectors (2)
 
Instrumentation and Methods for Astrophysics (2)
 
Mathematics - Analysis of PDEs (2)
 
Computer Science - Computer Vision and Pattern Recognition (2)
 
Computer Science - Artificial Intelligence (2)
 
Computer Science - Robotics (2)
 
Physics - Mesoscopic Systems and Quantum Hall Effect (2)
 
Physics - Soft Condensed Matter (1)
 
Computer Science - Computers and Society (1)
 
Computer Science - Computation and Language (1)
 
Physics - Superconductivity (1)
 
Physics - Computational Physics (1)
 
High Energy Physics - Phenomenology (1)
 
Quantitative Biology - Quantitative Methods (1)
 
Mathematics - Group Theory (1)
 
Physics - Plasma Physics (1)
 
Mathematics - Probability (1)
 
Quantitative Biology - Neurons and Cognition (1)
 
Cosmology and Nongalactic Astrophysics (1)
 
Physics - Data Analysis; Statistics and Probability (1)
 
Physics - Space Physics (1)
 
Mathematics - Optimization and Control (1)
 
Astrophysics of Galaxies (1)
 
Computer Science - Human-Computer Interaction (1)
 
Statistics - Applications (1)
 
Mathematics - Algebraic Topology (1)
 
Mathematics - Representation Theory (1)
 
Computer Science - Data Structures and Algorithms (1)
 
Computer Science - Information Retrieval (1)

Publications Authored By S. P. Smith

A conceptual design is presented of a novel ERL facility for the development and application of the energy recovery technique to linear electron accelerators in the multi-turn, large current and large energy regime. The main characteristics of the powerful energy recovery linac experiment facility (PERLE) are derived from the design of the Large Hadron electron Collider, an electron beam upgrade under study for the LHC, for which it would be the key demonstrator. PERLE is thus projected as a facility to investigate efficient, high current (> 10 mA) ERL operation with three re-circulation passages through newly designed SCRF cavities, at 801. Read More

In photovoltaics (PVs) and artificial photosynthetic systems based on excitons, the question of how energy must be lost in overcoming the Coulomb barrier, converting excitons to free charges, is fundamental, as it determines the achievable open-circuit voltage or over-potential1-3. Here, using transient and steady-state optical spectroscopy we study a model system, pentacene/C60, where pentacene triplet excitons are dissociated to form charge transfer states, which we show to be degenerate in energy with the triplet excitons. We directly track these charge transfer states undergoing efficient long-range separation to free charges within 50 ps, despite a significant Coulomb barrier that we measure to be 220 meV. Read More

A long-term energy option that is just approaching the horizon after decades of struggle, is fusion. Recent developments allow us to apply techniques from spin physics to advance its viability. The cross section for the primary fusion fuel in a tokamak reactor, D+T=>alpha+n, would be increased by a factor of 1. Read More

Ballistic quantum transport calculations based on the non-equilbrium Green's function formalism show that field-effect transistor devices made from chevron-type graphene nanoribbons (CGNRs) could exhibit negative differential resistance with peak-to-valley ratios in excess of 4800 at room temperature as well as steep-slope switching with 6 mV/decade subtheshold swing over five orders of magnitude and ON-currents of 88$\mu$A/$\mu$m. This is enabled by the superlattice-like structure of these ribbons that have large periodic unit cells with regions of different effective bandgap, resulting in minibands and gaps in the density of states above the conduction band edge. The CGNR ribbon used in our proposed device has been previously fabricated with bottom-up chemical synthesis techniques and could be incorporated into an experimentally-realizable structure. Read More

In chaotic deterministic systems, seemingly stochastic behavior is generated by relatively simple, though hidden, organizing rules and structures. Prominent among the tools used to characterize this complexity in 1D and 2D systems are techniques which exploit the topology of dynamically invariant structures. However, the path to extending many such topological techniques to three dimensions is filled with roadblocks that prevent their application to a wider variety of physical systems. Read More

In this paper we consider discrete robot path planning problems on metric graphs. We propose a clustering method, Gamma-Clustering for the planning graph that significantly reduces the number of feasible solutions, yet retains a solution within a constant factor of the optimal. By increasing the input parameter Gamma, the constant factor can be decreased, but with less reduction in the search space. Read More

Usually bilingual word vectors are trained "online". Mikolov et al. showed they can also be found "offline", whereby two pre-trained embeddings are aligned with a linear transformation, using dictionaries compiled from expert knowledge. Read More

The 4-dimensional Sklyanin algebras are a well-studied 2-parameter family of non-commutative graded algebras, often denoted A(E,tau), that depend on a quartic elliptic curve E in P^3 and a translation automorphism tau of E. They are graded algebras generated by four degree-one elements subject to six quadratic relations and in many important ways they behave like the polynomial ring on four indeterminates apart from the minor difference that they are not commutative. They are elliptic analogues of the enveloping algebra of sl(2,C) and the quantized enveloping algebras U_q(gl_2). Read More

We prove that the sectional category of the universal fibration with fibre X, for X any space that satisfies a well-known conjecture of Halperin, equals one after rationalization. Read More

Algorithms which sort lists of real numbers into ascending order have been studied for decades. They are typically based on a series of pairwise comparisons and run entirely on chip. However people routinely sort lists which depend on subjective or complex judgements that cannot be automated. Read More

Identifying and interpreting fetal standard scan planes during 2D ultrasound mid-pregnancy examinations are highly complex tasks which require years of training. Apart from guiding the probe to the correct location, it can be equally difficult for a non-expert to identify relevant structures within the image. Automatic image processing can provide tools to help experienced as well as inexperienced operators with these tasks. Read More

All electronic, optoelectronic or photovoltaic applications of silicon depend on controlling majority charge carriers via doping with impurity atoms. Nanoscale silicon is omnipresent in fundamental research (quantum dots, nanowires) but also approached in future technology nodes of the microelectronics industry. In general, silicon nanovolumes, irrespective of their intended purpose, suffer from effects that impede conventional doping due to fundamental physical principles such as out-diffusion, statistics of small numbers, quantum- or dielectric confinement. Read More

In order to constrain the evolutionary state of the red supergiant Betelgeuse, we have produced a suite of models with ZAMS masses from 15 to 25 Msun in intervals of 1 Msun including the effects of rotation. The models were computed with the stellar evolutionary code MESA. For non-rotating models we find results that are similar to other work. Read More

We determine the forcing number of complete $d$-ary trees. With an appropriate extension of the complete binary trees we disprove the conjecture of Gentner and Rautenbach on the size of minimum forcing sets in graphs with maximum degree 3. We characterize all connected graphs on $n$ vertices with forcing number at least $n-2$. Read More

Brain function results from communication between neurons connected by complex synaptic networks. Synapses are themselves highly complex and diverse signaling machines, containing protein products of hundreds of different genes, some in hundreds of copies, arranged in precise lattice at each individual synapse. Synapses are fundamental not only to synaptic network function but also to network development, adaptation, and memory. Read More

We test the utility of the OII 83.4 nm emission feature as a measure of ionospheric parameters. Observed with the Remote Atmospheric and Ionospheric Detection System (RAIDS) Extreme Ultraviolet Spectrograph on the International Space Station (ISS), limb profiles of 83. Read More

We are developing the frequency domain multiplexing (FDM) read-out of transition-edge sensor (TES) microcalorimeters for the X-ray Integral Field Unit (X-IFU) instrument on board of the future European X-Ray observatory Athena. The X-IFU instrument consists of an array of $\sim$3840 TESs with a high quantum efficiency ($>$90 \%) and spectral resolution $\Delta E$=2.5 eV $@$ 7 keV ($E/\Delta E\sim$2800). Read More

Defect is no longer deemed an adverse aspect of graphene. Contrarily, it can pave ways of extending applicability of graphene. Here, we discuss the effects of three types of defects on graphene: carbon deficiency, adatom (single Fe) dopant and introduction of functional groups (carboxyl, pyran group) on NO2 gas adsorption via density functional theory method. Read More

In this paper, we address the problem of computing optimal paths through three consecutive points for the curvature-constrained forward moving Dubins vehicle. Given initial and final configurations of the Dubins vehicle, and a midpoint with an unconstrained heading, the objective is to compute the midpoint heading that minimizes the total Dubins path length. We provide a novel geometrical analysis of the optimal path, and establish new properties of the optimal Dubins' path through three points. Read More

We present a novel approach to detect sets of most recent changepoints (MRC) in panel data. A panel is made up of a number of univariate time series and our method is described firstly for the univariate case where finding the most recent changepoint (prior to the end of the data) is straightforward. We then extend this to panel data where a number of MRC's that affect disjoint subsets of the series are identified. Read More

This work focuses on drift-diffusion equations with fractional dissipation $(-\Delta)^{\alpha}$ in the regime $\alpha \in (1/2,1)$. Our main result is an a priori H\"older estimate on smooth solutions to the Cauchy problem, starting from initial data with finite energy. We prove that for some $\beta \in (0,1)$, the $C^{\beta}$ norm of the solution depends only on the size of the drift in critical spaces of the form $L^{q}_{t}(BMO^{-\gamma}_{x})$ with $q>2$ and $\gamma \in (0,2\alpha-1]$, along with the $L^{2}_{x}$ norm of the initial datum. Read More

When performing large-scale, high-performance computations of multi-physics applications, it is common to limit the complexity of physics sub-models comprising the simulation. For a hierarchical system of coal boiler simulations a scale-bridging model is constructed to capture characteristics appropriate for the application-scale from a detailed coal devolatilization model. Such scale-bridging allows full descriptions of scale-applicable physics, while functioning at reasonable computational costs. Read More

2016Aug
Authors: K. Abe, K. Haga, Y. Hayato, M. Ikeda, K. Iyogi, J. Kameda, Y. Kishimoto, M. Miura, S. Moriyama, M. Nakahata, T. Nakajima, Y. Nakano, S. Nakayama, A. Orii, H. Sekiya, M. Shiozawa, A. Takeda, H. Tanaka, S. Tasaka, T. Tomura, R. Akutsu, T. Kajita, K. Kaneyuki, Y. Nishimura, E. Richard, K. Okumura, L. Labarga, P. Fernandez, F. d. M. Blaszczyk, J. Gustafson, C. Kachulis, E. Kearns, J. L. Raaf, J. L. Stone, L. R. Sulak, S. Berkman, C. M. Nantais, S. Tobayama, M. Goldhaber, W. R. Kropp, S. Mine, P. Weatherly, M. B. Smy, H. W. Sobel, V. Takhistov, K. S. Ganezer, B. L. Hartfiel, J. Hil, N. Hong, J. Y. Kim, I. T. Lim, R. G. Park, A. Himmel, Z. Li, E. O'Sullivan, K. Scholberg, C. W. Walter, T. Ishizuka, T. Nakamura, J. S. Jang, K. Choi, J. G. Learned, S. Matsuno, S. N. Smith, M. Friend, T. Hasegawa, T. Ishida, T. Ishii, T. Kobayashi, T. Nakadaira, K. Nakamura, Y. Oyama, K. Sakashita, T. Sekiguchi, T. Tsukamoto, A. T. Suzuki, Y. Takeuchi, T. Yano, S. V. Cao, T. Hiraki, S. Hirota, K. Huang, M. Jiang, A. Minamino, T. Nakaya, N. D. Patel, R. A. Wendell, K. Suzuki, Y. Fukuda, Y. Itow, T. Suzuki, P. Mijakowski, K. Frankiewicz, J. Hignight, J. Imber, C. K. Jung, X. Li, J. L. Palomino, G. Santucci, M. J. Wilking, C. Yanagisawa, D. Fukuda, H. Ishino, T. Kayano, A. Kibayashi, Y. Koshio, T. Mori, M. Sakuda, C. Xu, Y. Kuno, R. Tacik, S. B. Kim, H. Okazawa, Y. Choi, K. Nishijima, M. Koshiba, Y. Totsuka, Y. Suda, M. Yokoyama, C. Bronner, R. G. Calland, M. Hartz, K. Martens, Ll. Marti, Y. Suzuki, M. R. Vagins, J. F. Martin, H. A. Tanaka, A. Konaka, S. Chen, L. Wan, Y. Zhang, R. J. Wilkes

We report the results from a search in Super-Kamiokande for neutrino signals coincident with the first detected gravitational wave events, GW150914 and GW151226, using a neutrino energy range from 3.5 MeV to 100 PeV. We searched for coincident neutrino events within a time window of $\pm$500 seconds around the gravitational wave detection time. Read More

2016Aug
Authors: Didier Barret, Thien Lam Trong, Jan-Willem den Herder, Luigi Piro, Xavier Barcons, Juhani Huovelin, Richard Kelley, J. Miguel Mas-Hesse, Kazuhisa Mitsuda, Stéphane Paltani, Gregor Rauw, Agata Rożanska, Joern Wilms, Marco Barbera, Enrico Bozzo, Maria Teresa Ceballos, Ivan Charles, Anne Decourchelle, Roland den Hartog, Jean-Marc Duval, Fabrizio Fiore, Flavio Gatti, Andrea Goldwurm, Brian Jackson, Peter Jonker, Caroline Kilbourne, Claudio Macculi, Mariano Mendez, Silvano Molendi, Piotr Orleanski, François Pajot, Etienne Pointecouteau, Frederick Porter, Gabriel W. Pratt, Damien Prêle, Laurent Ravera, Etienne Renotte, Joop Schaye, Keisuke Shinozaki, Luca Valenziano, Jacco Vink, Natalie Webb, Noriko Yamasaki, Françoise Delcelier-Douchin, Michel Le Du, Jean-Michel Mesnager, Alice Pradines, Graziella Branduardi-Raymont, Mauro Dadina, Alexis Finoguenov, Yasushi Fukazawa, Agnieszka Janiuk, Jon Miller, Yaël Nazé, Fabrizio Nicastro, Salvatore Sciortino, Jose Miguel Torrejon, Hervé Geoffray, Isabelle Hernandez, Laure Luno, Philippe Peille, Jérôme André, Christophe Daniel, Christophe Etcheverry, Emilie Gloaguen, Jérémie Hassin, Gilles Hervet, Irwin Maussang, Jérôme Moueza, Alexis Paillet, Bruno Vella, Gonzalo Campos Garrido, Jean-Charles Damery, Chantal Panem, Johan Panh, Simon Bandler, Jean-Marc Biffi, Kevin Boyce, Antoine Clénet, Michael DiPirro, Pierre Jamotton, Simone Lotti, Denis Schwander, Stephen Smith, Bert-Joost van Leeuwen, Henk van Weers, Thorsten Brand, Beatriz Cobo, Thomas Dauser, Jelle de Plaa, Edoardo Cucchetti

The X-ray Integral Field Unit (X-IFU) on board the Advanced Telescope for High-ENergy Astrophysics (Athena) will provide spatially resolved high-resolution X-ray spectroscopy from 0.2 to 12 keV, with 5 arc second pixels over a field of view of 5 arc minute equivalent diameter and a spectral resolution of 2.5 eV up to 7 keV. Read More

Topological techniques are powerful tools for characterizing the complexity of many dynamical systems, including the commonly studied area-preserving maps of the plane. However, the extension of many topological techniques to higher dimensions is filled with roadblocks preventing their application. This article shows how to extend the homotopic lobe dynamics (HLD) technique, previously developed for 2D maps, to volume-preserving maps of a three-dimensional phase space. Read More

This paper examines the relationship between certain non-commutative analogues of projective 3-space, $\mathbb{P}^3$, and the quantized enveloping algebras $U_q(\mathfrak{sl}_2)$. The relationship is mediated by certain non-commutative graded algebras $S$, one for each $q \in \mathbb{C}^\times$, having a degree-two central element $c$ such that $S[c^{-1}]_0 \cong U_q(\mathfrak{sl}_2)$. The non-commutative analogues of $\mathbb{P}^3$ are the spaces $\operatorname{Proj}_{nc}(S)$. Read More

This article studies the Cauchy problem for the Boltzmann equation with stochastic kinetic transport. Under a cut-off assumption on the collision kernel and a coloring hypothesis for the noise coefficients, we prove the global existence of renormalized (in the sense of DiPerna/Lions) martingale solutions to the Boltzmann equation for large initial data with finite mass, energy, and entropy. Our analysis includes a detailed study of weak martingale solutions to a class of linear stochastic kinetic equations. Read More

2016Jun
Authors: Super-Kamiokande Collaboration1, :2, K. Abe3, Y. Haga4, Y. Hayato5, M. Ikeda6, K. Iyogi7, J. Kameda8, Y. Kishimoto9, Ll. Marti10, M. Miura11, S. Moriyama12, M. Nakahata13, T. Nakajima14, S. Nakayama15, A. Orii16, H. Sekiya17, M. Shiozawa18, Y. Sonoda19, A. Takeda20, H. Tanaka21, Y. Takenaga22, S. Tasaka23, T. Tomura24, K. Ueno25, T. Yokozawa26, R. Akutsu27, T. Irvine28, H. Kaji29, T. Kajita30, I. Kametani31, K. Kaneyuki32, K. P. Lee33, Y. Nishimura34, T. McLachlan35, K. Okumura36, E. Richard37, L. Labarga38, P. Fernandez39, F. d. M. Blaszczyk40, J. Gustafson41, C. Kachulis42, E. Kearns43, 32 J. L. Raaf44, J. L. Stone45, 32 L. R. Sulak46, S. Berkman47, S. Tobayama48, M. Goldhaber49, K. Bays50, G. Carminati51, N. J. Griskevich52, W. R. Kropp53, S. Mine54, A. Renshaw55, M. B. Smy56, H. W. Sobel57, V. Takhistov58, P. Weatherly59, K. S. Ganezer60, B. L. Hartfiel61, J. Hill62, W. E. Keig63, N. Hong64, J. Y. Kim65, I. T. Lim66, R. G. Park67, T. Akiri68, J. B. Albert69, A. Himmel70, Z. Li71, E. O'Sullivan72, K. Scholberg73, C. W. Walter74, T. Wongjirad75, T. Ishizuka76, T. Nakamura77, J. S. Jang78, K. Choi79, J. G. Learned80, S. Matsuno81, S. N. Smith82, M. Friend83, T. Hasegawa84, T. Ishida85, T. Ishii86, T. Kobayashi87, T. Nakadaira88, K. Nakamura89, K. Nishikawa90, Y. Oyama91, K. Sakashita92, T. Sekiguchi93, T. Tsukamoto94, Y. Nakano95, A. T. Suzuki96, Y. Takeuchi97, T. Yano98, S. V. Cao99, T. Hayashino100, T. Hiraki101, S. Hirota102, K. Huang103, K. Ieki104, M. Jiang105, T. Kikawa106, A. Minamino107, A. Murakami108, T. Nakaya109, N. D. Patel110, K. Suzuki111, S. Takahashi112, R. A. Wendell113, Y. Fukuda114, Y. Itow115, G. Mitsuka116, F. Muto117, T. Suzuki118, P. Mijakowski119, K. Frankiewicz120, J. Hignight121, J. Imber122, C. K. Jung123, X. Li124, J. L. Palomino125, G. Santucci126, I. Taylor127, C. Vilela128, M. J. Wilking129, C. Yanagisawa130, D. Fukuda131, H. Ishino132, T. Kayano133, A. Kibayashi134, Y. Koshio135, T. Mori136, M. Sakuda137, J. Takeuchi138, R. Yamaguchi139, Y. Kuno140, R. Tacik141, S. B. Kim142, H. Okazawa143, Y. Choi144, K. Ito145, K. Nishijima146, M. Koshiba147, Y. Totsuka148, Y. Suda149, M. Yokoyama150, C. Bronner151, R. G. Calland152, M. Hartz153, K. Martens154, Y. Obayashi155, Y. Suzuki156, M. R. Vagins157, C. M. Nantais158, J. F. Martin159, P. de Perio160, H. A. Tanaka161, A. Konaka162, S. Chen163, H. Sui164, L. Wan165, Z. Yang166, H. Zhang167, Y. Zhang168, K. Connolly169, M. Dziomba170, R. J. Wilkes171
Affiliations: 1Kamioka Observatory, Institute for Cosmic Ray Research, University of Tokyo, 2Kamioka Observatory, Institute for Cosmic Ray Research, University of Tokyo, 3Kamioka Observatory, Institute for Cosmic Ray Research, University of Tokyo, 4Kamioka Observatory, Institute for Cosmic Ray Research, University of Tokyo, 5Kamioka Observatory, Institute for Cosmic Ray Research, University of Tokyo, 6Kamioka Observatory, Institute for Cosmic Ray Research, University of Tokyo, 7Kamioka Observatory, Institute for Cosmic Ray Research, University of Tokyo, 8Kamioka Observatory, Institute for Cosmic Ray Research, University of Tokyo, 9Kamioka Observatory, Institute for Cosmic Ray Research, University of Tokyo, 10Kamioka Observatory, Institute for Cosmic Ray Research, University of Tokyo, 11Kamioka Observatory, Institute for Cosmic Ray Research, University of Tokyo, 12Kamioka Observatory, Institute for Cosmic Ray Research, University of Tokyo, 13Kamioka Observatory, Institute for Cosmic Ray Research, University of Tokyo, 14Kamioka Observatory, Institute for Cosmic Ray Research, University of Tokyo, 15Kamioka Observatory, Institute for Cosmic Ray Research, University of Tokyo, 16Kamioka Observatory, Institute for Cosmic Ray Research, University of Tokyo, 17Kamioka Observatory, Institute for Cosmic Ray Research, University of Tokyo, 18Kamioka Observatory, Institute for Cosmic Ray Research, University of Tokyo, 19Kamioka Observatory, Institute for Cosmic Ray Research, University of Tokyo, 20Kamioka Observatory, Institute for Cosmic Ray Research, University of Tokyo, 21Kamioka Observatory, Institute for Cosmic Ray Research, University of Tokyo, 22Kamioka Observatory, Institute for Cosmic Ray Research, University of Tokyo, 23Kamioka Observatory, Institute for Cosmic Ray Research, University of Tokyo, 24Kamioka Observatory, Institute for Cosmic Ray Research, University of Tokyo, 25Kamioka Observatory, Institute for Cosmic Ray Research, University of Tokyo, 26Kamioka Observatory, Institute for Cosmic Ray Research, University of Tokyo, 27Research Center for Cosmic Neutrinos, Institute for Cosmic Ray Research, University of Tokyo, 28Research Center for Cosmic Neutrinos, Institute for Cosmic Ray Research, University of Tokyo, 29Research Center for Cosmic Neutrinos, Institute for Cosmic Ray Research, University of Tokyo, 30Research Center for Cosmic Neutrinos, Institute for Cosmic Ray Research, University of Tokyo, 31Research Center for Cosmic Neutrinos, Institute for Cosmic Ray Research, University of Tokyo, 32Research Center for Cosmic Neutrinos, Institute for Cosmic Ray Research, University of Tokyo, 33Research Center for Cosmic Neutrinos, Institute for Cosmic Ray Research, University of Tokyo, 34Research Center for Cosmic Neutrinos, Institute for Cosmic Ray Research, University of Tokyo, 35Research Center for Cosmic Neutrinos, Institute for Cosmic Ray Research, University of Tokyo, 36Research Center for Cosmic Neutrinos, Institute for Cosmic Ray Research, University of Tokyo, 37Research Center for Cosmic Neutrinos, Institute for Cosmic Ray Research, University of Tokyo, 38Department of Theoretical Physics, University Autonoma Madrid, 39Department of Theoretical Physics, University Autonoma Madrid, 40Department of Physics, Boston University, 41Department of Physics, Boston University, 42Department of Physics, Boston University, 43Department of Physics, Boston University, 44Department of Physics, Boston University, 45Department of Physics, Boston University, 46Department of Physics, Boston University, 47Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of British Columbia, 48Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of British Columbia, 49Physics Department, Brookhaven National Laboratory, 50Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of California, Irvine, 51Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of California, Irvine, 52Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of California, Irvine, 53Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of California, Irvine, 54Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of California, Irvine, 55Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of California, Irvine, 56Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of California, Irvine, 57Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of California, Irvine, 58Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of California, Irvine, 59Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of California, Irvine, 60Department of Physics, California State University, 61Department of Physics, California State University, 62Department of Physics, California State University, 63Department of Physics, California State University, 64Department of Physics, Chonnam National University, 65Department of Physics, Chonnam National University, 66Department of Physics, Chonnam National University, 67Department of Physics, Chonnam National University, 68Department of Physics, Duke University, 69Department of Physics, Duke University, 70Department of Physics, Duke University, 71Department of Physics, Duke University, 72Department of Physics, Duke University, 73Department of Physics, Duke University, 74Department of Physics, Duke University, 75Department of Physics, Duke University, 76Junior College, Fukuoka Institute of Technology, 77Department of Physics, Gifu University, 78GIST College, Gwangju Institute of Science and Technology, 79Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Hawaii, 80Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Hawaii, 81Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Hawaii, 82Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Hawaii, 83High Energy Accelerator Research Organization, 84High Energy Accelerator Research Organization, 85High Energy Accelerator Research Organization, 86High Energy Accelerator Research Organization, 87High Energy Accelerator Research Organization, 88High Energy Accelerator Research Organization, 89High Energy Accelerator Research Organization, 90High Energy Accelerator Research Organization, 91High Energy Accelerator Research Organization, 92High Energy Accelerator Research Organization, 93High Energy Accelerator Research Organization, 94High Energy Accelerator Research Organization, 95Department of Physics, Kobe University, 96Department of Physics, Kobe University, 97Department of Physics, Kobe University, 98Department of Physics, Kobe University, 99Department of Physics, Kyoto University, 100Department of Physics, Kyoto University, 101Department of Physics, Kyoto University, 102Department of Physics, Kyoto University, 103Department of Physics, Kyoto University, 104Department of Physics, Kyoto University, 105Department of Physics, Kyoto University, 106Department of Physics, Kyoto University, 107Department of Physics, Kyoto University, 108Department of Physics, Kyoto University, 109Department of Physics, Kyoto University, 110Department of Physics, Kyoto University, 111Department of Physics, Kyoto University, 112Department of Physics, Kyoto University, 113Department of Physics, Kyoto University, 114Department of Physics, Miyagi University of Education, 115Institute for Space-Earth Enviromental Research, Nagoya University, 116Institute for Space-Earth Enviromental Research, Nagoya University, 117Institute for Space-Earth Enviromental Research, Nagoya University, 118Department of Physics, Kobe University, 119National Centre For Nuclear Research, 120National Centre For Nuclear Research, 121Department of Physics and Astronomy, State University of New York at Stony Brook, 122Department of Physics and Astronomy, State University of New York at Stony Brook, 123Department of Physics and Astronomy, State University of New York at Stony Brook, 124Department of Physics and Astronomy, State University of New York at Stony Brook, 125Department of Physics and Astronomy, State University of New York at Stony Brook, 126Department of Physics and Astronomy, State University of New York at Stony Brook, 127Department of Physics and Astronomy, State University of New York at Stony Brook, 128Department of Physics and Astronomy, State University of New York at Stony Brook, 129Department of Physics and Astronomy, State University of New York at Stony Brook, 130Department of Physics and Astronomy, State University of New York at Stony Brook, 131Department of Physics, Okayama University, Okayama, Okayama 700-8530, Japan, 132Department of Physics, Okayama University, Okayama, Okayama 700-8530, Japan, 133Department of Physics, Okayama University, Okayama, Okayama 700-8530, Japan, 134Department of Physics, Okayama University, Okayama, Okayama 700-8530, Japan, 135Department of Physics, Okayama University, Okayama, Okayama 700-8530, Japan, 136Department of Physics, Okayama University, Okayama, Okayama 700-8530, Japan, 137Department of Physics, Okayama University, Okayama, Okayama 700-8530, Japan, 138Department of Physics, Okayama University, Okayama, Okayama 700-8530, Japan, 139Department of Physics, Okayama University, Okayama, Okayama 700-8530, Japan, 140Department of Physics, Osaka University, 141Department of Physics, University of Regina, 142Department of Physics, Seoul National University, 143Department of Informatics in Social Welfare, Shizuoka University of Welfare, 144Department of Physics, Sungkyunkwan University, 145Department of Physics, Tokai University, 146Department of Physics, Tokai University, 147The University of Tokyo, 148The University of Tokyo, 149Department of Physics, University of Tokyo, 150Department of Physics, University of Tokyo, 151Kavli Institute for the Physics and Mathematics of the Universe, 152Kavli Institute for the Physics and Mathematics of the Universe, 153Kavli Institute for the Physics and Mathematics of the Universe, 154Kavli Institute for the Physics and Mathematics of the Universe, 155Kavli Institute for the Physics and Mathematics of the Universe, 156Kavli Institute for the Physics and Mathematics of the Universe, 157Kavli Institute for the Physics and Mathematics of the Universe, 158Department of Physics, University of Toronto, 159Department of Physics, University of Toronto, 160Department of Physics, University of Toronto, 161Department of Physics, University of Toronto, 162TRIUMF, 4004 Wesbrook Mall, 163Department of Engineering Physics, Tsinghua University, 164Department of Engineering Physics, Tsinghua University, 165Department of Engineering Physics, Tsinghua University, 166Department of Engineering Physics, Tsinghua University, 167Department of Engineering Physics, Tsinghua University, 168Department of Engineering Physics, Tsinghua University, 169Department of Physics, University of Washington, 170Department of Physics, University of Washington, 171Department of Physics, University of Washington

Upgraded electronics, improved water system dynamics, better calibration and analysis techniques allowed Super-Kamiokande-IV to clearly observe very low-energy 8B solar neutrino interactions, with recoil electron kinetic energies as low as 3.49 MeV. Super-Kamiokande-IV data-taking began in September of 2008; this paper includes data until February 2014, a total livetime of 1664 days. Read More

Propinquity between Australian Indigenous communities' social structures and ICT purposed for cultural preservation is a modern area of research; historically hindered by the "digital divide" thus limiting plentiful literature and existing information systems in this field in theoretical and practical applications. Henceforth, community consultation is mandatory in deriving and delivering empirically effective processes in a cultural and language preservation IS tool designed to teach future generations of Indigenous Australians about native culture and language. More than 100 out of 250 languages spoken by Indigenous have become extinct since 1788 (Harrington, 2014) which inaugurates the urgency of this preservation tool. Read More

Brownian dynamics simulations are an increasingly popular tool for understanding spatially-distributed biochemical reaction systems. Recent improvements in our understanding of the cellular environment show that volume exclusion effects are fundamental to reaction networks inside cells. These systems are frequently studied by incorporating inert hard spheres (crowders) into three-dimensional Brownian dynamics simulations, however these methods are extremely slow owing to the sheer number of possible collisions between particles. Read More

Brownian dynamics is a popular fine-grained method for simulating systems of interacting particles, such as chemical reactions. Though the method is simple to simulate, it is generally assumed that the dynamics is impossible to solve exactly and analytically, aside from some trivial systems. We here give the first exact analytical solution to a non-trivial Brownian dynamics system: the reaction $A+B\xrightleftharpoons[]{}C$ in equilibrium in one-dimensional periodic space. Read More

At SRON we are studying the performance of a Goddard Space Flight Center single pixel TES microcalorimeter operated in an AC bias configuration. For x-ray photons at 6 keV the pixel shows an x-ray energy resolution $dE_{FWHM} = 3.7\mathrm{eV}$, which is about a factor 2 worse than the energy resolution observed in an identical DC-biased pixel. Read More

Topological chaos has emerged as a powerful tool to investigate fluid mixing. While this theory can guarantee a lower bound on the stretching rate of certain material lines, it does not indicate what fraction of the fluid actually participates in this minimally mandated mixing. Indeed, the area in which effective mixing takes place depends on physical parameters such as the Reynolds number. Read More

Q0 determinations based on RF power measurements are subject to at least three potentially large systematic effects that have not been previously appreciated. Instrumental factors that can systematically bias RF based measurements of Q0 are quantified and steps that can be taken to improve the determination of Q0 are discussed. Read More

2016Jan
Authors: K. Abe1, Y. Haga2, Y. Hayato3, M. Ikeda4, K. Iyogi5, J. Kameda6, Y. Kishimoto7, M. Miura8, S. Moriyama9, M. Nakahata10, Y. Nakano11, S. Nakayama12, H. Sekiya13, M. Shiozawa14, Y. Suzuki15, A. Takeda16, H. Tanaka17, T. Tomura18, K. Ueno19, R. A. Wendell20, T. Yokozawa21, T. Irvine22, T. Kajita23, I. Kametani24, K. Kaneyuki25, K. P. Lee26, T. McLachlan27, Y. Nishimura28, E. Richard29, K. Okumura30, L. Labarga31, P. Fernandez32, S. Berkman33, H. A. Tanaka34, S. Tobayama35, J. Gustafson36, E. Kearns37, J. L. Raaf38, J. L. Stone39, L. R. Sulak40, M. Goldhaber41, G. Carminati42, W. R. Kropp43, S. Mine44, P. Weatherly45, A. Renshaw46, M. B. Smy47, H. W. Sobel48, V. Takhistov49, K. S. Ganezer50, B. L. Hartfiel51, J. Hill52, W. E. Keig53, N. Hong54, J. Y. Kim55, I. T. Lim56, T. Akiri57, A. Himmel58, K. Scholberg59, C. W. Walter60, T. Wongjirad61, T. Ishizuka62, S. Tasaka63, J. S. Jang64, J. G. Learned65, S. Matsuno66, S. N. Smith67, T. Hasegawa68, T. Ishida69, T. Ishii70, T. Kobayashi71, T. Nakadaira72, K. Nakamura73, Y. Oyama74, K. Sakashita75, T. Sekiguchi76, T. Tsukamoto77, A. T. Suzuki78, Y. Takeuchi79, C. Bronner80, S. Hirota81, K. Huang82, K. Ieki83, T. Kikawa84, A. Minamino85, A. Murakami86, T. Nakaya87, K. Suzuki88, S. Takahashi89, K. Tateishi90, Y. Fukuda91, K. Choi92, Y. Itow93, G. Mitsuka94, P. Mijakowski95, J. Hignight96, J. Imber97, C. K. Jung98, C. Yanagisawa99, M. J. Wilking100, H. Ishino101, A. Kibayashi102, Y. Koshio103, T. Mori104, M. Sakuda105, R. Yamaguchi106, T. Yano107, Y. Kuno108, R. Tacik109, S. B. Kim110, H. Okazawa111, Y. Choi112, K. Nishijima113, M. Koshiba114, Y. Suda115, Y. Totsuka116, M. Yokoyama117, K. Martens118, Ll. Marti119, M. R. Vagins120, J. F. Martin121, P. de Perio122, A. Konaka123, S. Chen124, Y. Zhang125, K. Connolly126, R. J. Wilkes127
Affiliations: 1Super-Kamiokande Collaboration, 2Super-Kamiokande Collaboration, 3Super-Kamiokande Collaboration, 4Super-Kamiokande Collaboration, 5Super-Kamiokande Collaboration, 6Super-Kamiokande Collaboration, 7Super-Kamiokande Collaboration, 8Super-Kamiokande Collaboration, 9Super-Kamiokande Collaboration, 10Super-Kamiokande Collaboration, 11Super-Kamiokande Collaboration, 12Super-Kamiokande Collaboration, 13Super-Kamiokande Collaboration, 14Super-Kamiokande Collaboration, 15Super-Kamiokande Collaboration, 16Super-Kamiokande Collaboration, 17Super-Kamiokande Collaboration, 18Super-Kamiokande Collaboration, 19Super-Kamiokande Collaboration, 20Super-Kamiokande Collaboration, 21Super-Kamiokande Collaboration, 22Super-Kamiokande Collaboration, 23Super-Kamiokande Collaboration, 24Super-Kamiokande Collaboration, 25Super-Kamiokande Collaboration, 26Super-Kamiokande Collaboration, 27Super-Kamiokande Collaboration, 28Super-Kamiokande Collaboration, 29Super-Kamiokande Collaboration, 30Super-Kamiokande Collaboration, 31Super-Kamiokande Collaboration, 32Super-Kamiokande Collaboration, 33Super-Kamiokande Collaboration, 34Super-Kamiokande Collaboration, 35Super-Kamiokande Collaboration, 36Super-Kamiokande Collaboration, 37Super-Kamiokande Collaboration, 38Super-Kamiokande Collaboration, 39Super-Kamiokande Collaboration, 40Super-Kamiokande Collaboration, 41Super-Kamiokande Collaboration, 42Super-Kamiokande Collaboration, 43Super-Kamiokande Collaboration, 44Super-Kamiokande Collaboration, 45Super-Kamiokande Collaboration, 46Super-Kamiokande Collaboration, 47Super-Kamiokande Collaboration, 48Super-Kamiokande Collaboration, 49Super-Kamiokande Collaboration, 50Super-Kamiokande Collaboration, 51Super-Kamiokande Collaboration, 52Super-Kamiokande Collaboration, 53Super-Kamiokande Collaboration, 54Super-Kamiokande Collaboration, 55Super-Kamiokande Collaboration, 56Super-Kamiokande Collaboration, 57Super-Kamiokande Collaboration, 58Super-Kamiokande Collaboration, 59Super-Kamiokande Collaboration, 60Super-Kamiokande Collaboration, 61Super-Kamiokande Collaboration, 62Super-Kamiokande Collaboration, 63Super-Kamiokande Collaboration, 64Super-Kamiokande Collaboration, 65Super-Kamiokande Collaboration, 66Super-Kamiokande Collaboration, 67Super-Kamiokande Collaboration, 68Super-Kamiokande Collaboration, 69Super-Kamiokande Collaboration, 70Super-Kamiokande Collaboration, 71Super-Kamiokande Collaboration, 72Super-Kamiokande Collaboration, 73Super-Kamiokande Collaboration, 74Super-Kamiokande Collaboration, 75Super-Kamiokande Collaboration, 76Super-Kamiokande Collaboration, 77Super-Kamiokande Collaboration, 78Super-Kamiokande Collaboration, 79Super-Kamiokande Collaboration, 80Super-Kamiokande Collaboration, 81Super-Kamiokande Collaboration, 82Super-Kamiokande Collaboration, 83Super-Kamiokande Collaboration, 84Super-Kamiokande Collaboration, 85Super-Kamiokande Collaboration, 86Super-Kamiokande Collaboration, 87Super-Kamiokande Collaboration, 88Super-Kamiokande Collaboration, 89Super-Kamiokande Collaboration, 90Super-Kamiokande Collaboration, 91Super-Kamiokande Collaboration, 92Super-Kamiokande Collaboration, 93Super-Kamiokande Collaboration, 94Super-Kamiokande Collaboration, 95Super-Kamiokande Collaboration, 96Super-Kamiokande Collaboration, 97Super-Kamiokande Collaboration, 98Super-Kamiokande Collaboration, 99Super-Kamiokande Collaboration, 100Super-Kamiokande Collaboration, 101Super-Kamiokande Collaboration, 102Super-Kamiokande Collaboration, 103Super-Kamiokande Collaboration, 104Super-Kamiokande Collaboration, 105Super-Kamiokande Collaboration, 106Super-Kamiokande Collaboration, 107Super-Kamiokande Collaboration, 108Super-Kamiokande Collaboration, 109Super-Kamiokande Collaboration, 110Super-Kamiokande Collaboration, 111Super-Kamiokande Collaboration, 112Super-Kamiokande Collaboration, 113Super-Kamiokande Collaboration, 114Super-Kamiokande Collaboration, 115Super-Kamiokande Collaboration, 116Super-Kamiokande Collaboration, 117Super-Kamiokande Collaboration, 118Super-Kamiokande Collaboration, 119Super-Kamiokande Collaboration, 120Super-Kamiokande Collaboration, 121Super-Kamiokande Collaboration, 122Super-Kamiokande Collaboration, 123Super-Kamiokande Collaboration, 124Super-Kamiokande Collaboration, 125Super-Kamiokande Collaboration, 126Super-Kamiokande Collaboration, 127Super-Kamiokande Collaboration

We present a real-time supernova neutrino burst monitor at Super-Kamiokande (SK). Detecting supernova explosions by neutrinos in real time is crucial for giving a clear picture of the explosion mechanism. Since the neutrinos are expected to come earlier than light, a fast broadcasting of the detection may give astronomers a chance to make electromagnetic radiation observations of the explosions right at the onset. Read More

The chemical master equation (CME) is the exact mathematical formulation of chemical reactions occurring in a dilute and well-mixed volume. The reaction-diffusion master equation (RDME) is a stochastic description of reaction-diffusion processes on a spatial lattice, assuming well-mixing only on the length scale of the lattice. It is clear that, for the sake of consistency, the solution of the RDME of a chemical system should converge to the solution of the CME of the same system in the limit of fast diffusion: indeed, this has been tacitly assumed in most literature concerning the RDME. Read More

Let $k$ be an algebraically closed field and ${\sf G}(2,k^4)$ the Grassmannian of 2-planes in $k^4$. We associate to each 6-dimensional subspace $R$ of the space of 4x4 matrices over $k$ a closed subscheme ${\bf X}_R \subseteq {\sf G}(2,k^4)$. We show that each irreducible component of ${\bf X}_R$ has dimension at least one and when ${\rm dim}({\bf X}_R)=1$, then ${\rm deg}({\bf X}_R)=20$ where degree is computed with respect to the ambient ${\mathbb P}^5$ under the Pl\"ucker embedding ${\sf G}(2,k^4) \to {\mathbb P}^5$. Read More

Let $\mathcal{G}$ be the set of all connected graphs on vertex set $[n]$. Define the partial ordering $<$ on $\mathcal{G}$ as follows: for $G,H\in \mathcal{G}$ let $GRead More

This article began as a study of the structure of infinite permutation groups G in which point stabilisers are finite and all infinite normal subgroups are transitive. That led to two variations. One is the generalisation in which point stabilisers are merely assumed to satisfy min-N, the minimal condition on normal subgroups. Read More

This note presents a new, elementary proof of a generalization of a theorem of Halin to graphs with unbounded degrees, which is then applied to show that every connected, countably infinite graph G with a subdegree-finite, infinite automorphism group whose cardinality is strictly less than continuum, has a finite set F of vertices that is setwise stabilized only by the identity automorphism. A bound on the size of such sets, which are called distinguishing, is also provided. To put this theorem of Halin and its generalization into perspective, we also discuss several related non-elementary, independent results and their methods of proof. Read More

2015Oct
Authors: E. Richard1, K. Okumura2, K. Abe3, Y. Haga4, Y. Hayato5, M. Ikeda6, K. Iyogi7, J. Kameda8, Y. Kishimoto9, M. Miura10, S. Moriyama11, M. Nakahata12, T. Nakajima13, Y. Nakano14, S. Nakayama15, A. Orii16, H. Sekiya17, M. Shiozawa18, A. Takeda19, H. Tanaka20, T. Tomura21, R. A. Wendell22, R. Akutsu23, T. Irvine24, T. Kajita25, K. Kaneyuki26, Y. Nishimura27, L. Labarga28, P. Fernandez29, J. Gustafson30, C. Kachulis31, E. Kearns32, J. L. Raaf33, J. L. Stone34, L. R. Sulak35, S. Berkman36, C. M. Nantais37, H. A. Tanaka38, S. Tobayama39, M. Goldhaber40, W. R. Kropp41, S. Mine42, P. Weatherly43, M. B. Smy44, H. W. Sobel45, V. Takhistov46, K. S. Ganezer47, B. L. Hartfiel48, J. Hill49, N. Hong50, J. Y. Kim51, I. T. Lim52, R. G. Park53, A. Himmel54, Z. Li55, E. OSullivan56, K. Scholberg57, C. W. Walter58, T. Wongjirad59, T. Ishizuka60, S. Tasaka61, J. S. Jang62, J. G. Learned63, S. Matsuno64, S. N. Smith65, M. Friend66, T. Hasegawa67, T. Ishida68, T. Ishii69, T. Kobayashi70, T. Nakadaira71, K. Nakamura72, Y. Oyama73, K. Sakashita74, T. Sekiguchi75, T. Tsukamoto76, A. T. Suzuki77, Y. Takeuchi78, T. Yano79, S. V. Cao80, T. Hiraki81, S. Hirota82, K. Huang83, T. Kikawa84, A. Minamino85, T. Nakaya86, K. Suzuki87, Y. Fukuda88, K. Choi89, Y. Itow90, T. Suzuki91, P. Mijakowski92, K. Frankiewicz93, J. Hignight94, J. Imber95, C. K. Jung96, X. Li97, J. L. Palomino98, M. J. Wilking99, C. Yanagisawa100, D. Fukuda101, H. Ishino102, T. Kayano103, A. Kibayashi104, Y. Koshio105, T. Mori106, M. Sakuda107, C. Xu108, Y. Kuno109, R. Tacik110, S. B. Kim111, H. Okazawa112, Y. Choi113, K. Nishijima114, M. Koshiba115, Y. Totsuka116, Y. Suda117, M. Yokoyama118, C. Bronner119, M. Hartz120, K. Martens121, Ll. Marti122, Y. Suzuki123, M. R. Vagins124, J. F. Martin125, A. Konaka126, S. Chen127, Y. Zhang128, R. J. Wilkes129
Affiliations: 1The Super-Kamiokande Collaboration, 2The Super-Kamiokande Collaboration, 3The Super-Kamiokande Collaboration, 4The Super-Kamiokande Collaboration, 5The Super-Kamiokande Collaboration, 6The Super-Kamiokande Collaboration, 7The Super-Kamiokande Collaboration, 8The Super-Kamiokande Collaboration, 9The Super-Kamiokande Collaboration, 10The Super-Kamiokande Collaboration, 11The Super-Kamiokande Collaboration, 12The Super-Kamiokande Collaboration, 13The Super-Kamiokande Collaboration, 14The Super-Kamiokande Collaboration, 15The Super-Kamiokande Collaboration, 16The Super-Kamiokande Collaboration, 17The Super-Kamiokande Collaboration, 18The Super-Kamiokande Collaboration, 19The Super-Kamiokande Collaboration, 20The Super-Kamiokande Collaboration, 21The Super-Kamiokande Collaboration, 22The Super-Kamiokande Collaboration, 23The Super-Kamiokande Collaboration, 24The Super-Kamiokande Collaboration, 25The Super-Kamiokande Collaboration, 26The Super-Kamiokande Collaboration, 27The Super-Kamiokande Collaboration, 28The Super-Kamiokande Collaboration, 29The Super-Kamiokande Collaboration, 30The Super-Kamiokande Collaboration, 31The Super-Kamiokande Collaboration, 32The Super-Kamiokande Collaboration, 33The Super-Kamiokande Collaboration, 34The Super-Kamiokande Collaboration, 35The Super-Kamiokande Collaboration, 36The Super-Kamiokande Collaboration, 37The Super-Kamiokande Collaboration, 38The Super-Kamiokande Collaboration, 39The Super-Kamiokande Collaboration, 40The Super-Kamiokande Collaboration, 41The Super-Kamiokande Collaboration, 42The Super-Kamiokande Collaboration, 43The Super-Kamiokande Collaboration, 44The Super-Kamiokande Collaboration, 45The Super-Kamiokande Collaboration, 46The Super-Kamiokande Collaboration, 47The Super-Kamiokande Collaboration, 48The Super-Kamiokande Collaboration, 49The Super-Kamiokande Collaboration, 50The Super-Kamiokande Collaboration, 51The Super-Kamiokande Collaboration, 52The Super-Kamiokande Collaboration, 53The Super-Kamiokande Collaboration, 54The Super-Kamiokande Collaboration, 55The Super-Kamiokande Collaboration, 56The Super-Kamiokande Collaboration, 57The Super-Kamiokande Collaboration, 58The Super-Kamiokande Collaboration, 59The Super-Kamiokande Collaboration, 60The Super-Kamiokande Collaboration, 61The Super-Kamiokande Collaboration, 62The Super-Kamiokande Collaboration, 63The Super-Kamiokande Collaboration, 64The Super-Kamiokande Collaboration, 65The Super-Kamiokande Collaboration, 66The Super-Kamiokande Collaboration, 67The Super-Kamiokande Collaboration, 68The Super-Kamiokande Collaboration, 69The Super-Kamiokande Collaboration, 70The Super-Kamiokande Collaboration, 71The Super-Kamiokande Collaboration, 72The Super-Kamiokande Collaboration, 73The Super-Kamiokande Collaboration, 74The Super-Kamiokande Collaboration, 75The Super-Kamiokande Collaboration, 76The Super-Kamiokande Collaboration, 77The Super-Kamiokande Collaboration, 78The Super-Kamiokande Collaboration, 79The Super-Kamiokande Collaboration, 80The Super-Kamiokande Collaboration, 81The Super-Kamiokande Collaboration, 82The Super-Kamiokande Collaboration, 83The Super-Kamiokande Collaboration, 84The Super-Kamiokande Collaboration, 85The Super-Kamiokande Collaboration, 86The Super-Kamiokande Collaboration, 87The Super-Kamiokande Collaboration, 88The Super-Kamiokande Collaboration, 89The Super-Kamiokande Collaboration, 90The Super-Kamiokande Collaboration, 91The Super-Kamiokande Collaboration, 92The Super-Kamiokande Collaboration, 93The Super-Kamiokande Collaboration, 94The Super-Kamiokande Collaboration, 95The Super-Kamiokande Collaboration, 96The Super-Kamiokande Collaboration, 97The Super-Kamiokande Collaboration, 98The Super-Kamiokande Collaboration, 99The Super-Kamiokande Collaboration, 100The Super-Kamiokande Collaboration, 101The Super-Kamiokande Collaboration, 102The Super-Kamiokande Collaboration, 103The Super-Kamiokande Collaboration, 104The Super-Kamiokande Collaboration, 105The Super-Kamiokande Collaboration, 106The Super-Kamiokande Collaboration, 107The Super-Kamiokande Collaboration, 108The Super-Kamiokande Collaboration, 109The Super-Kamiokande Collaboration, 110The Super-Kamiokande Collaboration, 111The Super-Kamiokande Collaboration, 112The Super-Kamiokande Collaboration, 113The Super-Kamiokande Collaboration, 114The Super-Kamiokande Collaboration, 115The Super-Kamiokande Collaboration, 116The Super-Kamiokande Collaboration, 117The Super-Kamiokande Collaboration, 118The Super-Kamiokande Collaboration, 119The Super-Kamiokande Collaboration, 120The Super-Kamiokande Collaboration, 121The Super-Kamiokande Collaboration, 122The Super-Kamiokande Collaboration, 123The Super-Kamiokande Collaboration, 124The Super-Kamiokande Collaboration, 125The Super-Kamiokande Collaboration, 126The Super-Kamiokande Collaboration, 127The Super-Kamiokande Collaboration, 128The Super-Kamiokande Collaboration, 129The Super-Kamiokande Collaboration

A comprehensive study on the atmospheric neutrino flux in the energy region from sub-GeV up to several TeV using the Super-Kamiokande water Cherenkov detector is presented in this paper. The energy and azimuthal spectra of the atmospheric ${\nu}_e+{\bar{\nu}}_e$ and ${\nu}_{\mu}+{\bar{\nu}}_{\mu}$ fluxes are measured. The energy spectra are obtained using an iterative unfolding method by combining various event topologies with differing energy responses. Read More

Topological insulators (TIs) exhibit novel physics with great promise for new devices, but considerable challenges remain to identify TIs with high structural stability and large nontrivial band gap suitable for practical applications. Here we predict by first-principles calculations a two-dimensional (2D) TI, also known as a quantum spin Hall (QSH) insulator, in a tetragonal bismuth bilayer (TB-Bi) structure that is dynamically and thermally stable based on phonon calculations and finite-temperature molecular dynamics simulations. Density functional theory and tight-binding calculations reveal a band inversion among the Bi-p orbits driven by the strong intrinsic spin-orbit coupling, producing a large nontrivial band gap, which can be effectively tuned by moderate strains. Read More

The motion of point vortices constitutes an especially simple class of solutions to Euler's equation for two dimensional, inviscid, incompressible, and irrotational fluids. In addition to their intrinsic mathematical importance, these solutions are also physically relevant. Rotating superfluid helium can support rectilinear quantized line vortices, which in certain regimes are accurately modeled by point vortices. Read More

Topological insulators (TIs) are promising for achieving dissipationless transport devices due to the robust gapless states inside the insulating bulk gap. However, currently realized 2D TIs, quantum spin Hall (QSH) insulators, suffer from ultra-high vacuum and extremely low temperature. Thus, seeking for desirable QSH insulators with high feasibility of experimental preparation and large nontrivial gap is of great importance for wide applications in spintronics. Read More

The reaction-diffusion master equation (RDME) is a standard modelling approach for understanding stochastic and spatial chemical kinetics. An inherent assumption is that molecules are point-like. Here we introduce the crowded reaction-diffusion master equation (cRDME) which takes into account volume exclusion effects on stochastic kinetics due to a finite molecular radius. Read More

Biochemical processes typically involve many chemical species, some in abundance and some in low molecule numbers. Here we first identify the rate constant limits under which the concentrations of a given set of species will tend to infinity (the abundant species) while the concentrations of all other species remains constant (the non-abundant species). Subsequently we prove that in this limit, the fluctuations in the molecule numbers of non-abundant species are accurately described by a hybrid stochastic description consisting of a chemical master equation coupled to deterministic rate equations. Read More

This is a continuation of our previous paper 1502.01744. We examine a class of non-commutative algebras A that depend on an elliptic curve and a translation automorphism of it. Read More

2015Aug
Authors: V. Takhistov1, K. Abe2, Y. Haga3, Y. Hayato4, M. Ikeda5, K. Iyogi6, J. Kameda7, Y. Kishimoto8, M. Miura9, S. Moriyama10, M. Nakahata11, T. Nakajima12, Y. Nakano13, S. Nakayama14, A. Orii15, H. Sekiya16, M. Shiozawa17, A. Takeda18, H. Tanaka19, T. Tomura20, R. A. Wendell21, T. Irvine22, T. Kajita23, I. Kametani24, K. Kaneyuki25, Y. Nishimura26, E. Richard27, K. Okumura28, L. Labarga29, P. Fernandez30, J. Gustafson31, C. Kachulis32, E. Kearns33, J. L. Raaf34, J. L. Stone35, L. R. Sulak36, S. Berkman37, C. M. Nantais38, H. A. Tanaka39, S. Tobayama40, M. Goldhaber41, G. Carminati42, W. R. Kropp43, S. Mine44, P. Weatherly45, A. Renshaw46, M. B. Smy47, H. W. Sobel48, K. S. Ganezer49, B. L. Hartfiel50, J. Hill51, N. Hong52, J. Y. Kim53, I. T. Lim54, A. Himmel55, Z. Li56, K. Scholberg57, C. W. Walter58, T. Wongjirad59, T. Ishizuka60, S. Tasaka61, J. S. Jang62, J. G. Learned63, S. Matsuno64, S. N. Smith65, M. Friend66, T. Hasegawa67, T. Ishida68, T. Ishii69, T. Kobayashi70, T. Nakadaira71, K. Nakamura72, Y. Oyama73, K. Sakashita74, T. Sekiguchi75, T. Tsukamoto76, A. T. Suzuki77, Y. Takeuchi78, T. Yano79, S. Hirota80, K. Huang81, K. Ieki82, T. Kikawa83, A. Minamino84, T. Nakaya85, K. Suzuki86, S. Takahashi87, Y. Fukuda88, K. Choi89, Y. Itow90, T. Suzuki91, P. Mijakowski92, K. Frankiewicz93, J. Hignight94, J. Imber95, C. K. Jung96, X. Li97, J. L. Palomino98, M. J. Wilking99, C. Yanagisawa100, H. Ishino101, T. Kayano102, A. Kibayashi103, Y. Koshio104, T. Mori105, M. Sakuda106, Y. Kuno107, R. Tacik108, S. B. Kim109, H. Okazawa110, Y. Choi111, K. Nishijima112, M. Koshiba113, Y. Suda114, Y. Totsuka115, M. Yokoyama116, C. Bronner117, M. Hartz118, K. Martens119, Ll. Marti120, Y. Suzuki121, M. R. Vagins122, J. F. Martin123, P. de Perio124, A. Konaka125, S. Chen126, Y. Zhang127, R. J. Wilkes128
Affiliations: 1The Super-Kamiokande Collaboration, 2The Super-Kamiokande Collaboration, 3The Super-Kamiokande Collaboration, 4The Super-Kamiokande Collaboration, 5The Super-Kamiokande Collaboration, 6The Super-Kamiokande Collaboration, 7The Super-Kamiokande Collaboration, 8The Super-Kamiokande Collaboration, 9The Super-Kamiokande Collaboration, 10The Super-Kamiokande Collaboration, 11The Super-Kamiokande Collaboration, 12The Super-Kamiokande Collaboration, 13The Super-Kamiokande Collaboration, 14The Super-Kamiokande Collaboration, 15The Super-Kamiokande Collaboration, 16The Super-Kamiokande Collaboration, 17The Super-Kamiokande Collaboration, 18The Super-Kamiokande Collaboration, 19The Super-Kamiokande Collaboration, 20The Super-Kamiokande Collaboration, 21The Super-Kamiokande Collaboration, 22The Super-Kamiokande Collaboration, 23The Super-Kamiokande Collaboration, 24The Super-Kamiokande Collaboration, 25The Super-Kamiokande Collaboration, 26The Super-Kamiokande Collaboration, 27The Super-Kamiokande Collaboration, 28The Super-Kamiokande Collaboration, 29The Super-Kamiokande Collaboration, 30The Super-Kamiokande Collaboration, 31The Super-Kamiokande Collaboration, 32The Super-Kamiokande Collaboration, 33The Super-Kamiokande Collaboration, 34The Super-Kamiokande Collaboration, 35The Super-Kamiokande Collaboration, 36The Super-Kamiokande Collaboration, 37The Super-Kamiokande Collaboration, 38The Super-Kamiokande Collaboration, 39The Super-Kamiokande Collaboration, 40The Super-Kamiokande Collaboration, 41The Super-Kamiokande Collaboration, 42The Super-Kamiokande Collaboration, 43The Super-Kamiokande Collaboration, 44The Super-Kamiokande Collaboration, 45The Super-Kamiokande Collaboration, 46The Super-Kamiokande Collaboration, 47The Super-Kamiokande Collaboration, 48The Super-Kamiokande Collaboration, 49The Super-Kamiokande Collaboration, 50The Super-Kamiokande Collaboration, 51The Super-Kamiokande Collaboration, 52The Super-Kamiokande Collaboration, 53The Super-Kamiokande Collaboration, 54The Super-Kamiokande Collaboration, 55The Super-Kamiokande Collaboration, 56The Super-Kamiokande Collaboration, 57The Super-Kamiokande Collaboration, 58The Super-Kamiokande Collaboration, 59The Super-Kamiokande Collaboration, 60The Super-Kamiokande Collaboration, 61The Super-Kamiokande Collaboration, 62The Super-Kamiokande Collaboration, 63The Super-Kamiokande Collaboration, 64The Super-Kamiokande Collaboration, 65The Super-Kamiokande Collaboration, 66The Super-Kamiokande Collaboration, 67The Super-Kamiokande Collaboration, 68The Super-Kamiokande Collaboration, 69The Super-Kamiokande Collaboration, 70The Super-Kamiokande Collaboration, 71The Super-Kamiokande Collaboration, 72The Super-Kamiokande Collaboration, 73The Super-Kamiokande Collaboration, 74The Super-Kamiokande Collaboration, 75The Super-Kamiokande Collaboration, 76The Super-Kamiokande Collaboration, 77The Super-Kamiokande Collaboration, 78The Super-Kamiokande Collaboration, 79The Super-Kamiokande Collaboration, 80The Super-Kamiokande Collaboration, 81The Super-Kamiokande Collaboration, 82The Super-Kamiokande Collaboration, 83The Super-Kamiokande Collaboration, 84The Super-Kamiokande Collaboration, 85The Super-Kamiokande Collaboration, 86The Super-Kamiokande Collaboration, 87The Super-Kamiokande Collaboration, 88The Super-Kamiokande Collaboration, 89The Super-Kamiokande Collaboration, 90The Super-Kamiokande Collaboration, 91The Super-Kamiokande Collaboration, 92The Super-Kamiokande Collaboration, 93The Super-Kamiokande Collaboration, 94The Super-Kamiokande Collaboration, 95The Super-Kamiokande Collaboration, 96The Super-Kamiokande Collaboration, 97The Super-Kamiokande Collaboration, 98The Super-Kamiokande Collaboration, 99The Super-Kamiokande Collaboration, 100The Super-Kamiokande Collaboration, 101The Super-Kamiokande Collaboration, 102The Super-Kamiokande Collaboration, 103The Super-Kamiokande Collaboration, 104The Super-Kamiokande Collaboration, 105The Super-Kamiokande Collaboration, 106The Super-Kamiokande Collaboration, 107The Super-Kamiokande Collaboration, 108The Super-Kamiokande Collaboration, 109The Super-Kamiokande Collaboration, 110The Super-Kamiokande Collaboration, 111The Super-Kamiokande Collaboration, 112The Super-Kamiokande Collaboration, 113The Super-Kamiokande Collaboration, 114The Super-Kamiokande Collaboration, 115The Super-Kamiokande Collaboration, 116The Super-Kamiokande Collaboration, 117The Super-Kamiokande Collaboration, 118The Super-Kamiokande Collaboration, 119The Super-Kamiokande Collaboration, 120The Super-Kamiokande Collaboration, 121The Super-Kamiokande Collaboration, 122The Super-Kamiokande Collaboration, 123The Super-Kamiokande Collaboration, 124The Super-Kamiokande Collaboration, 125The Super-Kamiokande Collaboration, 126The Super-Kamiokande Collaboration, 127The Super-Kamiokande Collaboration, 128The Super-Kamiokande Collaboration

Search results for nucleon decays $p \rightarrow e^+X$, $p \rightarrow \mu^+X$, $n \rightarrow \nu\gamma$ (where $X$ is an invisible, massless particle) as well as dinucleon decays $np \rightarrow e^+\nu$, $np \rightarrow \mu^+\nu$ and $np \rightarrow \tau^+\nu$ in the Super-Kamiokande experiment are presented. Using single-ring data from an exposure of 273.4 kton $\cdot$ years, a search for these decays yields a result consistent with no signal. Read More

Phosphorene, the single- or few-layer form of black phosphorus, was recently rediscovered as a twodimensional layered material holding great promise for applications in electronics and optoelectronics. Research into its fundamental properties and device applications has since seen exponential growth. In this Perspective, we review recent progress in phosphorene research, touching upon topics on fabrication, properties, and applications; we also discuss challenges and future research directions. Read More