S. Moretti - Southampton University

S. Moretti
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Name
S. Moretti
Affiliation
Southampton University
City
Farmingville
Country
United States

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High Energy Physics - Phenomenology (46)
 
High Energy Physics - Experiment (4)
 
Physics - Materials Science (2)
 
Physics - Mesoscopic Systems and Quantum Hall Effect (2)
 
Solar and Stellar Astrophysics (1)
 
Computer Science - Networking and Internet Architecture (1)
 
Computer Science - Computer Science and Game Theory (1)

Publications Authored By S. Moretti

One of the main features of a Two-Higgs Doublet Model (2HDM) is the presence of two additional neutral Higgs states, besides the one mimicking the ~125 GeV state observed at the LHC. The three Higgs bosons of a 2HDM can be produced at the LHC either singly via gluon fusion or in pairs with each other. When analyzing their pair production, the emphasis is laid on gluon-initiated processes, and the electroweak (EW) production is generally not treated on the same footing, assuming its contribution to be highly subleading. Read More

Motivated by an anomaly observed in the decay of an excited state of Beryllium by the Atomki collaboration, we study an extension of the Standard Model with a gauged $U(1)'$ symmetry in presence of a 2-Higgs Doublet Model structure of the Higgs sector. We show that this scenario complies with a variety of experimental results and is able to explain the potential presence of a resonant spin-1 gauge boson, $Z'$, with a mass of 17 MeV in the Atomki experimental data, for appropriate choices of $U(1)'$ charges and Yukawa interactions. Read More

In the next-to-minimal supersymmetric Standard Model (NMSSM), it is possible for either one of the additional singlet-like scalar and pseudoscalar Higgs bosons to be almost degenerate in mass with the ~125 GeV SM-like Higgs state. In the real NMSSM (rNMSSM), when the mass difference between two scalar states is comparable to their individual total decay widths, the quantum mechanical interference, due to the relevant diagonal as well as off-diagonal terms in the propagator matrix, between them can become sizable. This possibility invalidates usage of the narrow width approximation (NWA) to compute the cross section for the production of a di-photon pair with a given invariant mass via resonant Higgs boson(s) in the gluon fusion process at the Large Hadron Collider (LHC). Read More

We review the most relevant LHC searches at $\sqrt{s}$ = 8 TeV looking for low mass bosons arising from exotic decay of the Standard Model Higgs and highlighting their impact on both supersymmetric and not supersymmetric Beyond the Standard Model scenarios. Read More

We discuss the prospects for charged Higgs boson searches at the LHC, within the two-Higgs-doublet models (2HDM). The 2HDM is generally less constrained than the corresponding sector of the MSSM, but there are still severe theoretical and experimental constraints that already exclude significant regions of the naive parameter space. Explicit searches in the $H^+\to\tau^+\nu$ and $H^+\to t\bar b$ channels are further restricting parts of the 2HDM parameter space. Read More

We define a Focus Point (FP) Asymmetry, $A_{\rm FP}$, obtained by integrating the normalised transverse momentum distribution of either lepton produced in the Drell-Yan (DY) process below and above a point where a variety of popular $Z^\prime$ models all have the same magnitude. For a given $Z^\prime$ mass the position of this FP is predictable, depending only on the collider energy and on the low transverse momentum cut chosen in the normalisation procedure. The resulting $A_{\rm FP}$ is very sensitive to the $Z^\prime$ width, and can be used to constrain this parameter in experimental fits. Read More

We investigate single- and double-$h$, the discovered Standard Model (SM)-like Higgs boson, production at future $e^+e^-$ colliders in Composite 2-Higgs Doublet Models (C2HDMs) and Elementary 2-Higgs Doublet Models (E2HDMs) with a softly-broken $Z_2$ symmetry. We first survey their parameter spaces allowed by theoretical bounds from perturbative unitarity and vacuum stability as well as by future data at the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) with an integrated luminosity up to 3000 fb$^{-1}$ under the assumption that no new Higgs boson is detected. We then discuss how different the cross sections can be between the two scenarios when $\kappa_V^{}$, the $hVV$ ($V=W^\pm,Z$) coupling normalised to the SM value, is taken to be the same value in the both scenario We find that if $\kappa_V^2$ is found to be, e. Read More

Magnetic domain wall (DW) motion induced by a localized Gaussian temperature profile is studied in a Permalloy nanostrip within the framework of the stochastic Landau-Lifshitz-Bloch equation. The different contributions to thermally induced DW motion, entropic torque and magnonic spin transfer torque, are isolated and compared. The analysis of magnonic spin transfer torque includes a description of thermally excited magnons in the sample. Read More

We study the naturalness properties of the $B-L$ Supersymmetric Standard Model (BLSSM) and compare them to those of the Minimal Supersymmetric Standard Model (MSSM) at both low (i.e., Large Hadron Collider) energies and high (i. Read More

In networking and computing, resource allocation is typically addressed using classical sharing protocols as, for instance, the proportional division rule, the max-min fair allocation , or other solutions inspired by cooperative game theory. In this paper, we argue that, describing the resource allocation problem as a cooperative game, such classical resource allocation approaches, as well as associated notions of fairness, show important limitations. We identify in the individual satisfaction rate the key aspect of the challenge of defining a new notion of fairness and, consequently, a resource allocation algorithm more appropriate for the cooperative context. Read More

We present a study of di-lepton production at the CERN Large Hadron Collider with a particular focus on the contribution resulting from both real and virtual photons in the initial state. We discuss the region of phase space in which the invariant mass of the lepton pair is of the order of several TeV, where searches for new physics phenomena yielding a di-lepton signature are presently carried out. We study both the yield and associated uncertainties for all possible topologies in photon-induced di-lepton production and compare these with what is expected in the standard Drell-Yan channel, where quark-antiquark pairs are responsible for the production of lepton pairs. Read More

We study the production and decay of a light charged Higgs boson at the future Large Hadron electron Collider (LHeC) in the framework of the Two Higgs Doublet Type III, assuming a four-zero texture in the Yukawa matrices and a general Higgs potential. We analyze the charge current production processes $e^- p \to \nu_e q H^+ $ considering the signature $H^+ \to c \bar{b} + c.c. Read More

We examine the observability of heavy neutrino (nu_h) signatures of a U(1)' enlarged Standard Model (SM) encompassing three heavy Majorana neutrinos alongside the known light neutrino states at the the Large Hadron Collider (LHC). We show that heavy neutrinos can be rather long-lived particles producing distinctive displaced vertices that can be accessed in the CERN LHC detectors. We concentrate here on the gluon fusion production mechanism gg -> H_{1,2} -> nu_h nu_h, where H_1 is the discovered SM-like Higgs and H_2 is a heavier state, yielding displaced leptons following nu_h decays into weak gauge bosons. Read More

In this talk, we report unitarity constraints and phenomenological studies at the Large Hadron Collider for the extra Higgs bosons of a Composite 2-Higgs Doublet Model. Read More

The measurement of the $B\to X_s\gamma$ process gives important constraints on physics related to charged Higgs bosons ($H^\pm$). In 2-Higgs Doublet Models (2HDMs) with a softly-broken $Z_2$ symmetry, a light $H^\pm$ scenario, in which $H^\pm$ can be produced via the top decay, is possible in two of four types of Yukawa interactions (the so-called Type-I and Type-X). In these types of 2HDMs, the $H^\pm \to \tau^\pm \nu$ decay mode is dominant in wide regions of the parameter space. Read More

We investigate the sensitivity of top pair production to the properties of different Beyond the Standard Model theories embedding a new neutral boson. We include six-fermion decay, and account for the full tree-level Standard Model ttbar interference, with all intermediate particles allowed off-shell. We focus on those observables best suited to the lepton-plus-jets final state at the LHC, and simulate the resulting experimental conditions, including kinematic requirements and top quark pair reconstruction in the presence of missing transverse energy and combinatorial ambiguity in quark-top assignment. Read More

We review status and prospects of searches for the charged Higgs boson of 2-Higgs Doublet Models of all Yukawa types at the Large Hadron Collider Read More

We review the prospects of the Large Hadron Collider in accessing heavy charged Higgs boson signals in $b\bar b W^\pm$ final states, wherein the contributing channels can be $H^+\to t\bar b$, $hW^\pm$, $HW^\pm$ and $AW^\pm$. In particular, we devise a selection strategy which optimizes their global yield. We consider a 2-Higgs Doublet Model Type-II and we assume as production mode $bg\to tH^-$ + c. Read More

2016Oct
Authors: D. de Florian1, C. Grojean2, F. Maltoni3, C. Mariotti4, A. Nikitenko5, M. Pieri6, P. Savard7, M. Schumacher8, R. Tanaka9, R. Aggleton10, M. Ahmad11, B. Allanach12, C. Anastasiou13, W. Astill14, S. Badger15, M. Badziak16, J. Baglio17, E. Bagnaschi18, A. Ballestrero19, A. Banfi20, D. Barducci21, M. Beckingham22, C. Becot23, G. Bélanger24, J. Bellm25, N. Belyaev26, F. U. Bernlochner27, C. Beskidt28, A. Biekötter29, F. Bishara30, W. Bizon31, N. E. Bomark32, M. Bonvini33, S. Borowka34, V. Bortolotto35, S. Boselli36, F. J. Botella37, R. Boughezal38, G. C. Branco39, J. Brehmer40, L. Brenner41, S. Bressler42, I. Brivio43, A. Broggio44, H. Brun45, G. Buchalla46, C. D. Burgard47, A. Calandri48, L. Caminada49, R. Caminal Armadans50, F. Campanario51, J. Campbell52, F. Caola53, C. M. Carloni Calame54, S. Carrazza55, A. Carvalho56, M. Casolino57, O. Cata58, A. Celis59, F. Cerutti60, N. Chanon61, M. Chen62, X. Chen63, B. Chokoufé Nejad64, N. Christensen65, M. Ciuchini66, R. Contino67, T. Corbett68, D. Curtin69, M. Dall'Osso70, A. David71, S. Dawson72, J. de Blas73, W. de Boer74, P. de Castro Manzano75, C. Degrande76, R. L. Delgado77, F. Demartin78, A. Denner79, B. Di Micco80, R. Di Nardo81, S. Dittmaier82, A. Dobado83, T. Dorigo84, F. A. Dreyer85, M. Dührssen86, C. Duhr87, F. Dulat88, K. Ecker89, K. Ellis90, U. Ellwanger91, C. Englert92, D. Espriu93, A. Falkowski94, L. Fayard95, R. Feger96, G. Ferrera97, A. Ferroglia98, N. Fidanza99, T. Figy100, M. Flechl101, D. Fontes102, S. Forte103, P. Francavilla104, E. Franco105, R. Frederix106, A. Freitas107, F. F. Freitas108, F. Frensch109, S. Frixione110, B. Fuks111, E. Furlan112, S. Gadatsch113, J. Gao114, Y. Gao115, M. V. Garzelli116, T. Gehrmann117, R. Gerosa118, M. Ghezzi119, D. Ghosh120, S. Gieseke121, D. Gillberg122, G. F. Giudice123, E. W. N. Glover124, F. Goertz125, D. Gonçalves126, J. Gonzalez-Fraile127, M. Gorbahn128, S. Gori129, C. A. Gottardo130, M. Gouzevitch131, P. Govoni132, D. Gray133, M. Grazzini134, N. Greiner135, A. Greljo136, J. Grigo137, A. V. Gritsan138, R. Gröber139, S. Guindon140, H. E. Haber141, C. Han142, T. Han143, R. Harlander144, M. A. Harrendorf145, H. B. Hartanto146, C. Hays147, S. Heinemeyer148, G. Heinrich149, M. Herrero150, F. Herzog151, B. Hespel152, V. Hirschi153, S. Hoeche154, S. Honeywell155, S. J. Huber156, C. Hugonie157, J. Huston158, A. Ilnicka159, G. Isidori160, B. Jäger161, M. Jaquier162, S. P. Jones163, A. Juste164, S. Kallweit165, A. Kaluza166, A. Kardos167, A. Karlberg168, Z. Kassabov169, N. Kauer170, D. I. Kazakov171, M. Kerner172, W. Kilian173, F. Kling174, K. Köneke175, R. Kogler176, R. Konoplich177, S. Kortner178, S. Kraml179, C. Krause180, F. Krauss181, M. Krawczyk182, A. Kulesza183, S. Kuttimalai184, R. Lane185, A. Lazopoulos186, G. Lee187, P. Lenzi188, I. M. Lewis189, Y. Li190, S. Liebler191, J. Lindert192, X. Liu193, Z. Liu194, F. J. Llanes-Estrada195, H. E. Logan196, D. Lopez-Val197, I. Low198, G. Luisoni199, P. Maierhöfer200, E. Maina201, B. Mansoulié202, H. Mantler203, M. Mantoani204, A. C. Marini205, V. I. Martinez Outschoorn206, S. Marzani207, D. Marzocca208, A. Massironi209, K. Mawatari210, J. Mazzitelli211, A. McCarn212, B. Mellado213, K. Melnikov214, S. B. Menari215, L. Merlo216, C. Meyer217, P. Milenovic218, K. Mimasu219, S. Mishima220, B. Mistlberger221, S. -O. Moch222, A. Mohammadi223, P. F. Monni224, G. Montagna225, M. Moreno Llácer226, N. Moretti227, S. Moretti228, L. Motyka229, A. Mück230, M. Mühlleitner231, S. Munir232, P. Musella233, P. Nadolsky234, D. Napoletano235, M. Nebot236, C. Neu237, M. Neubert238, R. Nevzorov239, O. Nicrosini240, J. Nielsen241, K. Nikolopoulos242, J. M. No243, C. O'Brien244, T. Ohl245, C. Oleari246, T. Orimoto247, D. Pagani248, C. E. Pandini249, A. Papaefstathiou250, A. S. Papanastasiou251, G. Passarino252, B. D. Pecjak253, M. Pelliccioni254, G. Perez255, L. Perrozzi256, F. Petriello257, G. Petrucciani258, E. Pianori259, F. Piccinini260, M. Pierini261, A. Pilkington262, S. Plätzer263, T. Plehn264, R. Podskubka265, C. T. Potter266, S. Pozzorini267, K. Prokofiev268, A. Pukhov269, I. Puljak270, M. Queitsch-Maitland271, J. Quevillon272, D. Rathlev273, M. Rauch274, E. Re275, M. N. Rebelo276, D. Rebuzzi277, L. Reina278, C. Reuschle279, J. Reuter280, M. Riembau281, F. Riva282, A. Rizzi283, T. Robens284, R. Röntsch285, J. Rojo286, J. C. Romão287, N. Rompotis288, J. Roskes289, R. Roth290, G. P. Salam291, R. Salerno292, R. Santos293, V. Sanz294, J. J. Sanz-Cillero295, H. Sargsyan296, U. Sarica297, P. Schichtel298, J. Schlenk299, T. Schmidt300, C. Schmitt301, M. Schönherr302, U. Schubert303, M. Schulze304, S. Sekula305, M. Sekulla306, E. Shabalina307, H. S. Shao308, J. Shelton309, C. H. Shepherd-Themistocleous310, S. Y. Shim311, F. Siegert312, A. Signer313, J. P. Silva314, L. Silvestrini315, M. Sjodahl316, P. Slavich317, M. Slawinska318, L. Soffi319, M. Spannowsky320, C. Speckner321, D. M. Sperka322, M. Spira323, O. Stål324, F. Staub325, T. Stebel326, T. Stefaniak327, M. Steinhauser328, I. W. Stewart329, M. J. Strassler330, J. Streicher331, D. M. Strom332, S. Su333, X. Sun334, F. J. Tackmann335, K. Tackmann336, A. M. Teixeira337, R. Teixeira de Lima338, V. Theeuwes339, R. Thorne340, D. Tommasini341, P. Torrielli342, M. Tosi343, F. Tramontano344, Z. Trócsányi345, M. Trott346, I. Tsinikos347, M. Ubiali348, P. Vanlaer349, W. Verkerke350, A. Vicini351, L. Viliani352, E. Vryonidou353, D. Wackeroth354, C. E. M. Wagner355, J. Wang356, S. Wayand357, G. Weiglein358, C. Weiss359, M. Wiesemann360, C. Williams361, J. Winter362, D. Winterbottom363, R. Wolf364, M. Xiao365, L. L. Yang366, R. Yohay367, S. P. Y. Yuen368, G. Zanderighi369, M. Zaro370, D. Zeppenfeld371, R. Ziegler372, T. Zirke373, J. Zupan374
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This Report summarizes the results of the activities of the LHC Higgs Cross Section Working Group in the period 2014-2016. The main goal of the working group was to present the state-of-the-art of Higgs physics at the LHC, integrating all new results that have appeared in the last few years. The first part compiles the most up-to-date predictions of Higgs boson production cross sections and decay branching ratios, parton distribution functions, and off-shell Higgs boson production and interference effects. Read More

We study the sensitivity of top pair production with six-fermion decay at the LHC to the presence and nature of an underlying Z' boson, accounting for full tree-level Standard Model ttbar interference, with all intermediate particles allowed off-shell. We concentrate on the lepton-plus-jets final state and simulate experimental conditions, including kinematic requirements and top quark pair reconstruction in the presence of missing transverse energy and combinatorial ambiguity in jet-top assignment. We focus on the differential mass spectra of the cross section and asymmetry observables, especially demonstrating the use of the latter in probing the coupling structure of a new neutral resonance, in addition to cases in which the asymmetry forms a complementary discovery observable. Read More

We investigate the phenomenology of Composite 2-Higgs Doublet Models (C2HDMs) of various Yukawa types based on the global symmetry breaking $SO(6)\to SO(4)\times SO(2)$. The kinetic term and the Yukawa Lagrangian are constructed in terms of the pseudo Nambu-Goldstone Boson (pNGB) matrix and a 6-plet of fermions under $SO(6)$. The scalar potential is assumed to be the same as that of the Elementary 2-Higgs Doublet Model (E2HDM) with a softly-broken discrete $Z_2$ symmetry. Read More

We discuss the effect of the Photon Initiated (PI) process on the dilepton channel at the LHC. Adopting various QED PDF sets, we evaluate the contribution produced by two resolved photons which is not included in the Equivalent Photon Approximation (EPA). We compare the PI central value as predicted by the CTEQ, MRST and NNPDF collaborations. Read More

A number of searches at the LHC looking for low mass ($2m_{\mu} - 62\ \mathrm{GeV}$) bosons in $\sqrt{s} = 8\ \mathrm{TeV}$ data have recently been published. We summarise the most pertinent ones, and look at how their limits affect a variety of supersymmetric and non-supersymmetric models which can give rise to such light bosons: the 2HDM (Types I and II), the NMSSM, and the nMSSM. Read More

We study the high-energy behaviour of a class of anomaly-free abelian extensions of the Standard Model. We focus on the interplay among the phenomenological characterisation of the model and the use of precise renormalisation group methods. Using as boundary conditions regions of the parameter space at the verge of current LHC probe, interesting unification patterns emerge linked to thresholds belonging to a SO(10) grand unification theory (GUT). Read More

We study the sensitivity of top pair production with six-fermion decay at the LHC to the presence and nature of an underlying Z' boson, accounting for full tree-level Standard Model t\=t interference, with all intermediate particles allowed off-shell. We concentrate on the lepton-plus-jets final state and simulate experimental conditions, including kinematic requirements and top quark pair reconstruction in the presence of missing transverse energy and combinatorial ambiguity in jet-top assignment. We focus on the differential mass spectra of the cross section as well as asymmetry observables, especially demonstrating the use of the latter in probing the coupling structure of a new neutral resonance as well as cases in which the asymmetry forms a complementary discovery observable. Read More

We consider a class of minimal abelian extensions of the Standard Model with an extra neutral gauge boson $Z'$ at the TeV scale. In these scenarios an extended scalar sector and heavy right-handed neutrinos are naturally envisaged. We present some of their striking signatures at the Large Hadron Collider, the most interesting arising from a $Z'$ decaying to heavy neutrino pairs as well as a heavy scalar decaying to two Standard Model Higgses. Read More

We estimate the values of Yukawa couplings of a light pseudoscalar A with a mass of about 17 MeV, which would explain the $^8Be$ anomaly observed in the Atomki pair spectrometer experiment. The resulting couplings of A to up and down type quarks are about 0.3 times the coupling of the standard Higgs boson. Read More

We study mono-Higgs signatures emerging in the $B-L$ supersymmetric standard model induced by new channels not present in the minimal supersymmetric standard model, i.e., via topologies in which the mediator is either a heavy $Z'$, with mass of ${\cal O}(2~{\rm TeV})$, or an intermediate $h'$ (the lightest CP-even Higgs state of $B-L$ origin), with mass of ${\cal O}(0. Read More

We study an extension of the Standard Model (SM) in which two copies of the SM scalar $SU(2)$ doublet which do not acquire a Vacuum Expectation Value (VEV), and hence are \textit{inert}, are added to the scalar sector. We allow for CP-violation in the \textit{inert} sector, where the lightest \textit{inert} state is protected from decaying to SM particles through the conservation of a $Z_2$ symmetry. The lightest neutral particle from the \textit{inert} sector, which has a mixed CP-charge due to CP-violation, is hence a Dark Matter (DM) candidate. Read More

In this paper, we examine the consistency of the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) data collected during Run 1 and 2 by the ATLAS and CMS experiments with the predictions of a 2-Higgs Doublet Model (2HDM) embedding Vector-Like Quarks (VLQs) for the $pp \to H,A$ and production and decay mechanisms, respectively, of (nearly) degenerate CP-even ($H$) and CP-odd ($A$) Higgs bosons. We show that a scenario containing one single VLQ with Electro-Magnetic (EM) charge $2/3$ can explain the ATLAS and CMS data for masses in the region 375 GeV $\leq m_{\rm VLQ}\leq 1.5$ TeV or so, depending on $\tan\beta$, and for several values of the mixing angle between the top quark ($t$) and its VLQ counterpart ($T$). Read More

After 26 years from the major event of 1990, in early 2016 the puzzling symbiotic binary MWC 560 has gone into a new and even brighter outburst. We present our tight BVRI photometric monitoring of MWC 560 (451 independent runs distributed over 357 different nights), covering the 2005-2016 interval, and the current outburst in particoular. A stricking feature of the 2016 outburst has been the suppression of the short term chaotic variability during the rise toward maximum brightness, and its dominance afterward with an amplitude in excess of 0. Read More

In this study, we focus on the bosonic decays of light charged Higgs bosons in the 2-Higgs Doublet Model (2HDM) Type-I. We quantify the Branching Ratios (BRs) of the $H^\pm \to W^\pm h$ and $H^\pm\to W^\pm A$ channels and show that they could be substantial over several areas of the parameter space of the 2HDM Type-I that are still allowed by Large Hadron Collider (LHC) and other experimental data as well as theoretical constraints. We suggest that $H^\pm \to W^\pm h$ and/or $H^\pm \to W^\pm A$ could be used as a feasible discovery channel alternative to $H^\pm \to \tau\nu$. Read More

The goal of this report is to summarize the current situation and discuss possible search strategies for charged scalars, in non-supersymmetric extensions of the Standard Model at the LHC. Such scalars appear in Multi-Higgs-Doublet models (MHDM), in particular in the popular Two-Higgs-Doublet model (2HDM), allowing for charged and more neutral Higgs bosons. These models have the attractive property that electroweak precision observables are automatically in agreement with the Standard Model at the tree level. Read More

We explore the effects of Photon Induced (PI) production of a dilepton final state in the Large Hadron Collider environment. Using QED Parton Distribution Function (PDF) sets we can treat the photons as real partons inside the protons and compare their yield directly to that of the Drell-Yan (DY) process. In particular, we concentrate on an error analysis of the two mechanisms. Read More

We show how an excess in the diphoton channel can be the effect of neither a resonance nor an end-point in a cascade decay, but rather of a threshold for virtual production of a pair of extra quarks, each with half of peak invariant mass, onsetting in both the $gg$-initiated production and the $\gamma\gamma$-induced decay of an off-shell $Z$ boson. For our analysis we consider as paradigmatic example the 750 GeV excess previously seen at the end of 2015 with the Run 2 data of the LHC but not confirmed with 2016 data. Read More

The constraints from the measurements of the $B\to X_s\gamma$ decay rate on the parameter space of 3-Higgs Doublet Models (3HDMs), where all the doublets have non-zero vacuum expectation values, are studied at the next-to-leading order in QCD. In order to naturally avoid the presence of flavour changing neutral currents at the tree level, we impose two softly-broken discrete $Z_2$ symmetries. This gives rise to five independent types of 3HDMs that differ in their Yukawa couplings. Read More

We study a class of non-exotic minimal $U(1) '$ extensions of the Standard Model, which includes all scenarios that are anomaly-free with the ordinary fermion content augmented by one Right-Handed neutrino per generation, wherein the new Abelian gauge group is spontaneously broken by the non-zero Vacuum Expectation Value of an additional Higgs singlet field, in turn providing mass to a $Z'$ state. By adopting the $B-L$ example, whose results can be recast into those pertaining to the whole aforementioned class, and allowing for both scalar and gauge mixing, we first extract the surviving parameter space in presence of up-to-date theoretical and experimental constraints. Over the corresponding parameter configurations, we then delineate the high energy behaviour of such constructs in terms of their stability and perturbativity. Read More

In models with extended Higgs sectors, it is possible that the Higgs boson discovered at the LHC is not the lightest one. We show that in a realistic model (the Type I 2-Higgs Doublet Model), when the sum of the masses of a light scalar and a pseudoscalar ($h$ and $A$) is smaller than the $Z$ boson mass, the Electroweak (EW) production of an $hA$ pair can dominate over QCD production by orders of magnitude, a fact not previously highlighted. This is because in the $gg$-initiated process, $hA$ production via a resonant $Z$ in the $s$-channel is prohibited according to the Landau-Yang theorem, which is not the case for the $q\bar{q}$-initiated process. Read More

In the light of the most recent data from Higgs boson searches and analyses, we re-assess the scope of the Large Hadron Collider in accessing heavy charged Higgs boson signals in $b\bar b W^\pm$ final states, wherein the contributing channels can be $H^+\to t\bar b$, $hW^\pm, HW^\pm$ and $AW^\pm$. We consider a 2-Higgs Doublet Model Type-II and we assume as production mode $bg\to tH^-$ + c.c. Read More

We show that supersymmetric effects driven by penguin contributions to the $b \to c \tau \nu_\tau$ transition are able to account simultaneously for a significant increase of both branching ratios of $\bar{B}\to D \tau\bar{\nu}_{\tau}$ and $\bar{B} \to D^{*} \tau\bar{\nu}_{\tau}$ with respect to the Standard Model predictions, thereby approaching their experimentally measured values. {We emphasise that a degeneracy between the lightest chargino and neutralino (wino-like) masses is an essential condition for enhancing the effect of the lepton penguin $\tau \nu_\tau W^{\pm}$, which is responsible for the improved theoretical predictions with respect to current data. Read More

The domain wall depinning from a notch in a Permalloy nanostrip on top of a ${\rm SiO_2/Si}$ substrate is studied theoretically under application of static magnetic fields and the injection of short current pulses. The influence of Joule heating on current-induced domain wall depinning is explored self-consistently by coupling the magnetization dynamics in the ferromagnetic strip to the heat transport throughout the system. Our results indicate that Joule heating plays a remarkable role in these processes, resulting in a reduction in the critical depinning field and/or in a temporary destruction of the ferromagnetic order for typically injected current pulses. Read More

This paper explores the effects of both finite width and interference (with background) in the production and decay of extra heavy quarks at the Large Hadron Collider (LHC). This dynamics is normally ignored in standard experimental searches and we assess herein the regions of validity of current approaches. Further, we discuss the configurations of masses, widths and couplings where the latter breaks down. Read More

We study bounds from perturbative unitarity in a Composite 2-Higgs Doublet Model (C2HDM) based on the spontaneous breakdown of a global symmetry $SO(6)\to SO(4)\times SO(2)$ at the compositeness scale $f$. The eight pseudo Nambu-Goldstone Bosons (pNGBs) emerging from such a dynamics are identified as two isospin doublet Higgs fields. We calculate the $S$-wave amplitude for all possible 2-to-2-body elastic (pseudo)scalar boson scatterings at energy scales $\sqrt{s}$ reachable at the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) and beyond it, including the longitudinal components of weak gauge boson states as the corresponding pNGB states. Read More

The Drell-Yan di-lepton production at hadron colliders is by far the preferred channel to search for new heavy spin-1 particles. Traditionally, such searches have exploited the Narrow Width Approximation (NWA) for the signal, thereby neglecting the effect of the interference between the additional Z'-bosons and the Standard Model Z and {\gamma}. Recently, it has been established that both finite width and interference effects can be dealt with in experimental searches while still retaining the model independent approach ensured by the NWA. Read More

We study the scope of the Large Hadron Collider in accessing a neutral Higgs boson of the $B-L$ Supersymmetric Standard Model. After assessing the surviving parameter space configurations following the Run 1 data taking, we investigate the possibilities of detecting this object during Run 2. For the model configurations in which the mixing between such a state and the discovered Standard Model-like Higgs boson is non-negligible, there exist several channels enabling its discovery over a mass range spanning from $\approx 140$ to $\approx$ 500 GeV. Read More

We discuss a possible explanation of the recently observed diphoton excess at around 750 GeV as seen by the ATLAS and CMS experiments at the Large Hadron Collider. We calculate the cross section of the diphoton signature in 2-Higgs Doublet Models with the addition of a real isospin scalar multiplet without a vacuum expectation value, where a neutral component of such a representation can be a dark matter candidate. We find that the branching fraction of an additional CP-even Higgs boson $H$ from the doublet fields into the diphoton mode can be significantly enhanced, by up to a factor of $10^3$, with respect to the case of the simple 2-Higgs Doublet Model. Read More

The study of the top quark properties will be an integral part of any particle physics activity at future leptonic colliders. In this proceeding we discuss the possibility of testing composite Higgs scenarios at $e^+e^-$ prototypes through deviations from the Standard Model predictions in $t\bar t$ production observables for various centre of mass energies, ranging from 370 GeV up to 1 TeV. This proceedings draws from Ref. Read More

Searches at the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) for neutral, long-lived particles have historically relied on the detection of displaced particles produced by their decay $\textit{within}$ the detector volume. In this paper we study the potential of the complementary signature comprising of the missing transverse energy ($E_T^{miss}$) signal, traditionally used to look for dark matter, e.g. Read More

Search for invisible final states produced at the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) by new physics scenarios are normally carried out resorting to a variety of probes emerging from the initial state, in the form of single-jet, -photon and -$Z$ boson signatures. These are particularly effective for models of Supersymmetry (SUSY) in presence of $R$-parity conservation, owing to the presence in their spectra of a stable neutralino as dark matter candidate. We assume here as theoretical framework Supersymmetric ($B-L$) extension of the Standard Model (BLSSM), wherein a mediator for invisible decays can be $Z'$ boson. Read More

A second light Higgs boson, with mass of approximately 145 GeV, is predicted by non-minimal Supersymmetric models. This new particle can account for an apparent \sim 3 \sigma excess recorded by the CMS experiment at the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) during Run 1. We show how this can be explained in a particular realisation of these scenarios, the (B-L) Supersymmetric Model (BLSSM), which also has other captivating features, like offering an explanation for neutrino masses and relieving the small hierarchy problem of the Minimal Supersymmetric Standard Model (MSSM). Read More