Robert J. Siverd - Vanderbilt University

Robert J. Siverd
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Name
Robert J. Siverd
Affiliation
Vanderbilt University
City
Nashville
Country
United States

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Pub Categories

 
Earth and Planetary Astrophysics (23)
 
Solar and Stellar Astrophysics (15)
 
Instrumentation and Methods for Astrophysics (5)
 
Astrophysics (2)
 
Computer Science - Software Engineering (1)
 
High Energy Astrophysical Phenomena (1)

Publications Authored By Robert J. Siverd

RZ Psc is a young Sun-like star, long associated with the UXor class of variable stars, which is partially or wholly dimmed by dust clumps several times each year. The system has a bright and variable infrared excess, which has been interpreted as evidence that the dimming events are the passage of asteroidal fragments in front of the host star. Here, we present a decade of optical photometry of RZ Psc and take a critical look at the asteroid belt interpretation. Read More

Be stars have generally been characterized by the emission lines in their spectra, and especially the time variability of those spectroscopic features. They are known to also exhibit photometric variability at multiple timescales, but have not been broadly compared and analyzed by that behavior. We have taken advantage of the advent of wide-field, long-baseline, and high-cadence photometric surveys that search for transiting exoplanets to perform a comprehensive analysis of brightness variations among a large number of known Be stars. Read More

We report the discovery of KELT-12b, a highly inflated Jupiter-mass planet transiting a mildly evolved host star. We identified the initial transit signal in the KELT-North survey data and established the planetary nature of the companion through precise follow-up photometry, high-resolution spectroscopy, precise radial velocity measurements, and high-resolution adaptive optics imaging. Our preferred best-fit model indicates that the $V = 10. Read More

In some planet formation theories, protoplanets grow gravitationally within a young star's protoplanetary disk, a signature of which may be a localized disturbance in the disk's radial and/or vertical structure. Using time-series photometric observations by the Kilodegree Extremely Little Telescope South (KELT-South) project and the All-Sky Automated Survey for SuperNovae (ASAS-SN), combined with archival observations, we present the discovery of two extended dimming events of the young star, DM Ori. This young system faded by $\sim$1. Read More

We present photometric observations of RW Aurigae, a Classical T Tauri system, that reveal two remarkable dimming events. These events are similar to that which we observed in 2010-2011, which was the first such deep dimming observed in RW Aur in a century's worth of photometric monitoring. We suggested the 2010-2011 dimming was the result of an occultation of the star by its tidally disrupted circumstellar disk. Read More

The Large Synoptic Survey Telescope (LSST) will be the largest time-domain photometric survey ever. In order to maximize the LSST science yield for a broad array of transient stellar phenomena, it is necessary to optimize the survey cadence, coverage, and depth via quantitative metrics that are specifically designed to characterize the time-domain behavior of various types of stellar transients. In this paper we present three such metrics built on the LSST Metric Analysis Framework (MAF) model (Jones et al. Read More

AA Tau is a well studied young stellar object that presents many of the photometric characteristics of a Classical T Tauri star (CTTS), including short-timescale stochastic variability attributed to spots and/or accretion as well as long duration dimming events attributed to occultations by vertical features (e.g., warps) in its circumstellar disk. Read More

2014Nov
Affiliations: 1Vanderbilt University, 2Stockholm University, 3Vanderbilt University, 4Lehigh University

We report observations of the bright M82 supernova 2014J serendipitously obtained with the Kilodegree Extremely Little Telescope (KELT). The SN was observed at high cadence for over 100 days, from pre-explosion, to early rise and peak times, through the secondary bump. The high cadence KELT data with high S/N is completely unique for SN 2014J and for any other SNIa, with the exception of the (yet) unpublished Kepler data. Read More

We have used Sloan Digital Sky Survey-III (SDSS-III) Apache Point Observatory Galactic Evolution Experiment (APOGEE) radial velocity observations in the near-infrared $H$-band to explore the membership of the nearby ($86.7 \pm 0.9$ pc) open cluster Coma Berenices (Melotte 111), concentrating on the poorly-populated low-mass end of the main sequence. Read More

We present secondary eclipse observations of the highly irradiated transiting brown dwarf KELT-1b. These observations represent the first constraints on the atmospheric dynamics of a highly irradiated brown dwarf, and the atmospheres of irradiated giant planets at high surface gravity. Using the Spitzer Space Telescope, we measure secondary eclipse depths of 0. Read More

We report the discovery of KELT-6b, a mildly-inflated Saturn-mass planet transiting a metal-poor host. The initial transit signal was identified in KELT-North survey data, and the planetary nature of the occulter was established using a combination of follow-up photometry, high-resolution imaging, high-resolution spectroscopy, and precise radial velocity measurements. The fiducial model from a global analysis including constraints from isochrones indicates that the V=10. Read More

RW Aur A is a classical T Tauri star, believed to have undergone a reconfiguration of its circumstellar environment as a consequence of a recent fly-by of its stellar companion, RW Aur B. This interaction stripped away part of the circumstellar disk of RW Aur A, leaving a tidally disrupted arm and a short truncated circumstellar disk. We present photometric observations of the RW Aur system from the Kilodegree Extremely Little Telescope (KELT) survey showing a long and deep dimming that occurred from September 2010 until March 2011. Read More

Filtergraph is a web application being developed and maintained by the Vanderbilt Initiative in Data-intensive Astrophysics (VIDA) to flexibly and rapidly visualize a large variety of astronomy datasets of various formats and sizes. The user loads a flat-file dataset into Filtergraph which automatically generates an interactive data portal that can be easily shared with others. From this portal, the user can immediately generate scatter plots of up to 5 dimensions as well as histograms and tables based on the dataset. Read More

We report the discovery of a highly eccentric, double-lined spectroscopic binary star system (TYC 3010-1494-1), comprising two solar-type stars that we had initially identified as a single star with a brown dwarf companion. At the moderate resolving power of the MARVELS spectrograph and the spectrographs used for subsequent radial-velocity (RV) measurements (R ~ <30,000), this particular stellar binary mimics a single-lined binary with an RV signal that would be induced by a brown dwarf companion (Msin(i)~50 M_Jup) to a solar-type primary. At least three properties of this system allow it to masquerade as a single star with a very low-mass companion: its large eccentricity (e~0. Read More

Filtergraph is a web application being developed by the Vanderbilt Initiative in Data-intensive Astrophysics (VIDA) to flexibly handle a large variety of astronomy datasets. While current datasets at Vanderbilt are being used to search for eclipsing binaries and extrasolar planets, this system can be easily reconfigured for a wide variety of data sources. The user loads a flat-file dataset into Filtergraph which instantly generates an interactive data portal that can be easily shared with others. Read More

The Kilodegree Extremely Little Telescope (KELT) project is a survey for new transiting planets around bright stars. KELT-South is a small-aperture, wide-field automated telescope located at Sutherland, South Africa. The telescope surveys a set of 26 degree by 26 degree fields around the southern sky, and targets stars in the range of 8 < V < 10 mag, searching for transits by Hot Jupiters. Read More

We present a new short-period brown dwarf candidate around the star TYC 1240-00945-1. This candidate was discovered in the first year of the Multi-object APO Radial Velocity Exoplanets Large-area Survey (MARVELS), which is part of the third phase of the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS-III), and we designate the brown dwarf as MARVELS-1b. MARVELS uses the technique of dispersed fixed-delay interferometery to simultaneously obtain radial velocity measurements for 60 objects per field using a single, custom-built instrument that is fiber fed from the SDSS 2. Read More

As the quality and quantity of astrophysical data continue to improve, the precision with which certain astrophysical events can be timed becomes limited not by the data themselves, but by the manner, standard, and uniformity with which time itself is referenced. While some areas of astronomy (most notably pulsar studies) have required absolute time stamps with precisions of considerably better than 1 minute for many decades, recently new areas have crossed into this regime. In particular, in the exoplanet community, we have found that the (typically unspecified) time standards adopted by various groups can differ by as much as a minute. Read More

The Kilodegree Extremely Little Telescope (KELT) project is a small aperture, wide-angle search for planetary transits of solar-type stars. In this paper, we present the results of a commissioning campaign with the KELT telescope to observe the open cluster Praesepe for 34 nights in early 2005. Lightcurves were obtained for 69,337 stars, out of which we identify 58 long period variables and 152 periodic variables. Read More

2007Apr
Affiliations: 1The Ohio State University Department of Astronomy, 2The Ohio State University Department of Astronomy, 3The Ohio State University Department of Astronomy, 4The Ohio State University Department of Astronomy, 5The Ohio State University Department of Astronomy, 6University of Arizona Department of Astronomy, 7The Ohio State University Department of Astronomy, 8The Ohio State University Department of Astronomy, 9The Ohio State University Department of Astronomy, 10Winer Observatory, 11Winer Observatory
Category: Astrophysics

The Kilodegree Extremely Little Telescope (KELT) project is a survey for planetary transits of bright stars. It consists of a small-aperture, wide-field automated telescope located at Winer Observatory near Sonoita, Arizona. The telescope surveys a set of 26 x 26 degree fields, together covering about 25% of the Northern sky, targeting stars in the range of 8Read More