Ramanath Cowsik - McDonnell Center for the Space Sciences, Washington University, St. Louis, USA

Ramanath Cowsik
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Name
Ramanath Cowsik
Affiliation
McDonnell Center for the Space Sciences, Washington University, St. Louis, USA
City
St. Louis
Country
United States

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Cosmology and Nongalactic Astrophysics (4)
 
Instrumentation and Methods for Astrophysics (2)
 
High Energy Physics - Phenomenology (2)
 
High Energy Astrophysical Phenomena (2)
 
Astrophysics of Galaxies (1)
 
Physics - Accelerator Physics (1)
 
Nuclear Theory (1)
 
High Energy Physics - Experiment (1)
 
Nuclear Experiment (1)
 
High Energy Physics - Lattice (1)

Publications Authored By Ramanath Cowsik

2015Oct
Affiliations: 1Washington University in Saint Louis, Physics Department and McDonnell Center for the Space Sciences, 2Jet Propulsion Laboratory, 3California Institute of Technology, Cahill Center for Astronomy and Astrophysics, 4Washington University in Saint Louis, Physics Department and McDonnell Center for the Space Sciences, 5Washington University in Saint Louis, Physics Department and McDonnell Center for the Space Sciences, 6Washington University in Saint Louis, Physics Department and McDonnell Center for the Space Sciences, 7Washington University in Saint Louis, Physics Department and McDonnell Center for the Space Sciences, 8Washington University in Saint Louis, Physics Department and McDonnell Center for the Space Sciences, 9Washington University in Saint Louis, Physics Department and McDonnell Center for the Space Sciences, 10Anton Pannekoek Institute for Astronomy, 11California Institute of Technology, Cahill Center for Astronomy and Astrophysics, 12California Institute of Technology, Cahill Center for Astronomy and Astrophysics, 13Jet Propulsion Laboratory, 14Jet Propulsion Laboratory, 15Rice University, Department of Physics and Astronomy, 16Washington University in Saint Louis, Physics Department and McDonnell Center for the Space Sciences, 17Georgia College, Department of Chemistry, Physics, and Astronomy, 18Jet Propulsion Laboratory, 19Jet Propulsion Laboratory, 20North-West University, Centre for Space Research, 21Technical University of Denmark, DTU Space, National Space Institute, 22Yale University, Department of Astronomy, 23Washington University in Saint Louis, Physics Department and McDonnell Center for the Space Sciences, 24University of Virginia, Department of Astronomy, 25MPI for Extraterrestrial Physics Garching, 26Durham University, Centre for Extragalactic Astronomy, Department of Physics, 27Jet Propulsion Laboratory, 28North Carolina State University, Department of Physics, 29Jet Propulsion Laboratory, 30Cambridge, Institute of Astronomy, UK, 31Penn State University, Department of Astronomy and Astrophysics, 32Jet Propulsion Laboratory, 33University of California, Berkeley, Department of Physics, 34ASI Science Data Center, Italy, 35California Institute of Technology, Cahill Center for Astronomy and Astrophysics, 36Cambridge, Institute of Astronomy, UK, 37Jet Propulsion Laboratory, 38Purdue University, Department of Physics and Astronomy, 39Texas Tech University, Physics Department, 40Nagoya University, Center for Experimental Studies, Kobayashi-Maskawa Institute for the Origin of Particles and the Universe, 41University of Maryland, Physics Department, 42RIKEN, 43Univ. of Michigan in Ann Arbor, Astronomy Dept, 44Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics, 45Istituto di Astrofisica e Planetologia Spaziali, INAF, 46Department of Astronomy/Steward Observatory, 47Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, 48Jet Propulsion Laboratory, 49Department of Astronomy/Steward Observatory, 50NASA Goddard Space Flight Center, 51Tohoku University, Astronomical Institute, 52NASA Goddard Space Flight Center

This paper describes the Polarization Spectroscopic Telescope Array (PolSTAR), a mission proposed to NASA's 2014 Small Explorer (SMEX) announcement of opportunity. PolSTAR measures the linear polarization of 3-50 keV (requirement; goal: 2.5-70 keV) X-rays probing the behavior of matter, radiation and the very fabric of spacetime under the extreme conditions close to the event horizons of black holes, as well as in and around magnetars and neutron stars. Read More

In this paper we note that the spectral intensities of antiprotons observed in Galactic cosmic rays in the energy range ~ 1-100 GeV by BESS, PAMELA and AMS instruments display nearly the same spectral shape as that generated by primary cosmic rays through their interaction with matter in the interstellar medium, without any significant modifications. More importantly, a constant residence time of ~ 2.5 +/-0. Read More

2013Jun
Authors: Andreas S. Kronfeld1, Robert S. Tschirhart2, Usama Al-Binni, Wolfgang Altmannshofer, Charles Ankenbrandt, Kaladi Babu, Sunanda Banerjee, Matthew Bass, Brian Batell, David V. Baxter, Zurab Berezhiani, Marc Bergevin, Robert Bernstein, Sudeb Bhattacharya, Mary Bishai, Thomas Blum, S. Alex Bogacz, Stephen J. Brice, Joachim Brod, Alan Bross, Michael Buchoff, Thomas W. Burgess, Marcela Carena, Luis A. Castellanos, Subhasis Chattopadhyay, Mu-Chun Chen, Daniel Cherdack, Norman H. Christ, Tim Chupp, Vincenzo Cirigliano, Pilar Coloma, Christopher E. Coppola, Ramanath Cowsik, J. Allen Crabtree, André de Gouvêa, Jean-Pierre Delahaye, Dmitri Denisov, Patrick deNiverville, Ranjan Dharmapalan, Markus Diefenthaler, Alexander Dolgov, Georgi Dvali, Estia Eichten, Jürgen Engelfried, Phillip D. Ferguson, Tony Gabriel, Avraham Gal, Franz Gallmeier, Kenneth S. Ganezer, Susan Gardner, Douglas Glenzinski, Stephen Godfrey, Elena S. Golubeva, Stefania Gori, Van B. Graves, Geoffrey Greene, Cory L. Griffard, Ulrich Haisch, Thomas Handler, Brandon Hartfiel, Athanasios Hatzikoutelis, Ayman Hawari, Lawrence Heilbronn, James E. Hill, Patrick Huber, David E. Jaffe, Xiaodong Jiang, Christian Johnson, Yuri Kamyshkov, Daniel M. Kaplan, Boris Kerbikov, Brendan Kiburg, Harold G. Kirk, Andreas Klein, Kyle Knoepfel, Boris Kopeliovich, Vladimir Kopeliovich, Joachim Kopp, Wolfgang Korsch, Graham Kribs, Ronald Lipton, Chen-Yu Liu, Wolfgang Lorenzon, Zheng-Tian Lu, Naomi C. R. Makins, David McKeen, Geoffrey Mills, Michael Mocko, Rabindra Mohapatra, Nikolai V. Mokhov, Guenter Muhrer, Pieter Mumm, David Neuffer, Lev Okun, Mark A. Palmer, Robert Palmer, Robert W. Pattie Jr., David G. Phillips II, Kevin Pitts, Maxim Pospelov, Vitaly S. Pronskikh, Chris Quigg, Erik Ramberg, Amlan Ray, Paul E. Reimer, David G. Richards, Adam Ritz, Amit Roy, Arthur Ruggles, Robert Ryne, Utpal Sarkar, Andy Saunders, Yannis K. Semertzidis, Anatoly Serebrov, Hirohiko Shimizu, Robert Shrock, Arindam K. Sikdar, Pavel V. Snopok, William M. Snow, Aria Soha, Stefan Spanier, Sergei Striganov, Zhaowen Tang, Lawrence Townsend, Jon Urheim, Arkady Vainshtein, Richard Van de Water, Ruth S. Van de Water, Richard J. Van Kooten, Bernard Wehring, William C. Wester III, Lisa Whitehead, Robert J. Wilson, Elizabeth Worcester, Albert R. Young, Geralyn Zeller
Affiliations: 1Editors, 2Editors

Part 2 of "Project X: Accelerator Reference Design, Physics Opportunities, Broader Impacts". In this Part, we outline the particle-physics program that can be achieved with Project X, a staged superconducting linac for intensity-frontier particle physics. Topics include neutrino physics, kaon physics, muon physics, electric dipole moments, neutron-antineutron oscillations, new light particles, hadron structure, hadron spectroscopy, and lattice-QCD calculations. Read More

The distributions of normal matter and of dark matter in the Galaxy are coupled to each other as they both move in the common gravitational potential. In order to fully exploit this interplay and to derive the various properties of dark matter relevant to their direct and indirect detection, we have comprehensively reviewed the astronomical observations of the spatial and velocity distributions of the components of normal matter. We then postulate that the phase-space distribution of dark matter follows a lowered-isothermal form and self-consistently solve Poisson's equation to construct several models for the spatial and velocity distributions of dark matter. Read More

Analyses of measurements of the distribution of absolute brightness temperature over the radio sky have led recently to suggestions that there exists a substantial unexplained extragalactic radio background. Consequently, there have been numerous attempts to place constraints on plausible origins for the `excess'. We suggest here this expectation of a large extragalactic background, over and above that contributed by the sources observed in the surveys, is based on an extremely simple geometry adopted to model the Galactic emission and the procedure adopted in the estimation of the extragalactic contribution. Read More

2010Sep
Affiliations: 1Raman Research Institute, Bangalore, India, 2Raman Research Institute, Bangalore, India, 3Raman Research Institute, Bangalore, India, 4Raman Research Institute, Bangalore, India, 5Raman Research Institute, Bangalore, India, 6McDonnell Center for the Space Sciences, Washington University, St. Louis, USA

We describe the current status of the design and development of a Thomson X-ray polarimeter suitable for a small satellite mission. Currently we are considering two detector geometries, one using rectangular detectors placed on four sides of a scattering element and the other using a single cylindrical detector with the scattering element at the center. The rectangular detector configuration has been fabricated and tested. Read More

Direct detection of Weakly Interacting Massive Particle (WIMP) candidates of Dark Matter (DM) is studied within the context of a self-consistent truncated isothermal model of the finite-size dark halo of the Galaxy based on the "King model" of the phase space distribution function of collisionless DM particles. Our halo model takes into account the modifications of the phase-space structure of the halo due to the gravitational influence of the observed visible matter in a self-consistent manner. The parameters of the halo model are determined by a fit to a recently determined circular rotation curve of the Galaxy that extends up to $\sim$ 60 kpc. Read More

In the Fornax dwarf spheroidal galaxy the globular clusters are distributed widely, without any significant central concentration. Oh et al. pointed out that such a distribution is paradoxical: dynamical friction effects estimated using single-component King models would have forced the globular clusters to spiral down to the center of the galaxy well within a Hubble time. Read More