R. Russell - Laboratory for Nuclear Science, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, MA, USA and the Bates Research and Engineering Center, Middleton MA

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Name
R. Russell
Affiliation
Laboratory for Nuclear Science, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, MA, USA and the Bates Research and Engineering Center, Middleton MA
City
Middleton
Country
United States

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Solar and Stellar Astrophysics (22)
 
Astrophysics (11)
 
Earth and Planetary Astrophysics (10)
 
Physics - Instrumentation and Detectors (4)
 
Nuclear Experiment (4)
 
Mathematics - Numerical Analysis (3)
 
High Energy Physics - Experiment (3)
 
High Energy Astrophysical Phenomena (2)
 
Cosmology and Nongalactic Astrophysics (1)
 
Astrophysics of Galaxies (1)
 
Computer Science - Networking and Internet Architecture (1)
 
Mathematics - Metric Geometry (1)
 
Computer Science - Performance (1)
 
Instrumentation and Methods for Astrophysics (1)

Publications Authored By R. Russell

Using the NASA/IRTF SpeX & BASS spectrometers we have obtained novel 0.7 - 13 um observations of the newly imaged HD36546 debris disk system. The SpeX spectrum is most consistent with the photospheric emission expected from an Lstar ~ 20 Lsun, solar abundance A1. Read More

Non-Euclidean triangle centers can be described using homogeneous coordinates that are proportional to the generalized sines of the directed distances of a given center from the edges of the reference triangle. Identical homogeneous coordinates of a specific triangle center may be used for all spaces of uniform Gaussian curvature. We also define the median point and centroid for a set of points in non-Euclidean space. Read More

We present near and mid-infrared interferometric observations made with the Keck Interferometer Nuller and near-contemporaneous spectro-photometry from the IRTF of 11 well known young stellar objects, several observed for the first time in these spectral and spatial resolution regimes. With AU-level spatial resolution, we first establish characteristic sizes of the infrared emission using a simple geometrical model consisting of a hot inner rim and mid-infrared disk emission. We find a high degree of correlation between the stellar luminosity and the mid-infrared disk sizes after using near-infrared data to remove the contribution from the inner rim. Read More

The OLYMPUS experiment used a 0.3 T toroidal magnetic spectrometer to measure the momenta of outgoing charged particles. In order to accurately determine particle trajectories, knowledge of the magnetic field was needed throughout the spectrometer volume. Read More

The James Webb Space Telescope (JWST), as the largest space-based astronomical observatory with near- and mid-infrared instrumentation, will elucidate many mysterious aspects of comets. We summarize four cometary science themes especially suited for this telescope and its instrumentation: the drivers of cometary activity, comet nucleus heterogeneity, water ice in comae and on surfaces, and activity in faint comets and main-belt asteroids. With JWST, we can expect the most distant detections of gas, especially CO2, in what we now consider to be only moderately bright comets. Read More

Gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) are the most luminous explosions in the universe, yet the nature and physical properties of their energy sources are far from understood. Very important clues, however, can be inferred by studying the afterglows of these events. We present optical and X-ray observations of GRB 130831A obtained by Swift, Chandra, Skynet, RATIR, Maidanak, ISON, NOT, LT and GTC. Read More

As traffic patterns and network topologies become more and more complicated in current enterprise data centers and TOP500 supercomputers, the probability of network congestion increases. If no countermeasures are taken, network congestion causes long communication delays and degrades network performance. A congestion control mechanism is often provided to reduce the consequences of congestion. Read More

We present pre-perihelion infrared 8 to 31 micron spectrophotometric and imaging observations of comet C/2012 K1 (Pan-STARRS), a dynamically new Oort Cloud comet, conducted with NASA's Stratospheric Observatory for Infrared Astronomy (SOFIA) facility (+FORCAST) in 2014 June. As a "new" comet (first inner solar system passage), the coma grain population may be extremely pristine, unencumbered by a rime and insufficiently irradiated by the Sun to carbonize its surface organics. The comet exhibited a weak 10 micron silicate feature ~1. Read More

We analyze 3 epochs of ultraviolet (UV), optical and near-infrared (NIR) observations of the Taurus transitional disk GM Aur using the Hubble Space Telescope Imaging Spectrograph (STIS) and the Infrared Telescope Facility SpeX spectrograph. Observations were separated by one week and 3 months in order to study variability over multiple timescales. We calculate accretion rates for each epoch of observations using the STIS spectra and find that those separated by one week had similar accretion rates (~1E-8 solar masses/yr) while the epoch obtained 3 months later had a substantially lower accretion rate (~4E-9 solar masses/yr). Read More

We present a comparative numerical study for three functionals used for variational mesh adaptation. One of them is a generalisation of Winslow's variable diffusion functional while the others are based on equidistribution and alignment. These functionals are known to have nice theoretical properties and work well for most mesh adaptation problems either as a stand-alone variational method or combined within the moving mesh framework. Read More

We present infrared spectroscopic and photometric observations of the nova V2468 Cyg covering the period from 2008 March 13 till 2008 November 11. The JHK spectra of the object have been taken from the Mount Abu Infrared Observatory using the Near-Infrared Imager/Spectrometer. Spectra from 0. Read More

We present the first resolved near infrared imagery of the transition disk Oph IRS 48 (WLY 2-48), which was recently observed with ALMA to have a strongly asymmetric sub-millimeter flux distribution. H-band polarized intensity images show a $\sim$60AU radius scattered light cavity with two pronounced arcs of emission, one from Northeast to Southeast and one smaller, fainter and more distant arc in the Northwest. K-band scattered light imagery reveals a similar morphology, but with a clear third arc along the Southwestern rim of the disk cavity. Read More

We present near-IR and far-UV observations of the pre-transitional (gapped) disk in HD 169142 using NASA's Infrared Telescope Facility and Hubble Space Telescope. The combination of our data along with existing data sets into the broadband spectral energy distribution reveals variability of up to 45% between ~1.5-10 {\mu}m over a maximum timescale of 10 years. Read More

HD 50138 is a B[e] star surrounded by a large amount of circumstellar gas and dust. Its spectrum shows characteristics which may indicate either a pre- or a post-main-sequence system. Mapping the kinematics of the gas in the inner few au of the system contributes to a better understanding of its physical nature. Read More

The principles of mesh equidistribution and alignment play a fundamental role in the design of adaptive methods, and a metric tensor M and mesh metric are useful theoretical tools for understanding a methods level of mesh alignment, or anisotropy. We consider a mesh redistribution method based on the Monge-Ampere equation, which combines equidistribution of a given scalar density function with optimal transport. It does not involve explicit use of a metric tensor M, although such a tensor must exist for the method, and an interesting question to ask is whether or not the alignment produced by the metric gives an anisotropic mesh. Read More

The eruptive variable V838 Monocerotis gained notoriety in 2002 when it brightened nine magnitudes in a series of three outbursts and then rapidly evolved into an extremely cool supergiant. We present optical, near-IR, and mid-IR spectroscopic and photometric observations of V838 Monocerotis obtained between 2008 and 2012 at the Apache Point Observatory 3.5m, NASA IRTF 3m, and Gemini South 8m telescopes. Read More

Many adaptive mesh methods explicitly or implicitly use equidistribution and alignment. These principles can be considered central to mesh adaption. A Metric Tensor is the tool by which one describes the desired level of mesh anisotropy. Read More

Herbig Ae/Be stars are intermediate-mass pre-main sequence stars surrounded by circumstellar dust disks. Some are observed to produce jets, whose appearance as a sequence of shock fronts (knots) suggests a past episodic outflow variability. This "jet fossil record" can be used to reconstruct the outflow history. Read More

HD 166191 has been identified by several studies as hosting a rare and extremely bright warm debris disc with an additional outer cool disc component. However, an alternative interpretation is that the star hosts a disc that is currently in transition between a full gas disc and a largely gas-free debris disc. With the help of new optical to mid-IR spectra and Herschel imaging, we argue that the latter interpretation is supported in several ways: i) we show that HD 166191 is co-moving with the ~4 Myr-old Herbig Ae star HD 163296, suggesting that the two have the same age, ii) the disc spectrum of HD 166191 is well matched by a standard radiative transfer model of a gaseous protoplanetary disc with an inner hole, and iii) the HD 166191 mid-IR silicate feature is more consistent with similarly primordial objects. Read More

The OLYMPUS experiment was designed to measure the ratio between the positron-proton and electron-proton elastic scattering cross sections, with the goal of determining the contribution of two-photon exchange to the elastic cross section. Two-photon exchange might resolve the discrepancy between measurements of the proton form factor ratio, $\mu_p G^p_E/G^p_M$, made using polarization techniques and those made in unpolarized experiments. OLYMPUS operated on the DORIS storage ring at DESY, alternating between 2. Read More

2013Jul
Affiliations: 1Laboratory for Nuclear Science, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, MA, USA and the Bates Research and Engineering Center, Middleton MA, 2Laboratory for Nuclear Science, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, MA, USA and the Bates Research and Engineering Center, Middleton MA, 3Laboratory for Nuclear Science, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, MA, USA and the Bates Research and Engineering Center, Middleton MA, 4Laboratory for Nuclear Science, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, MA, USA and the Bates Research and Engineering Center, Middleton MA, 5Laboratory for Nuclear Science, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, MA, USA and the Bates Research and Engineering Center, Middleton MA, 6Laboratory for Nuclear Science, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, MA, USA and the Bates Research and Engineering Center, Middleton MA, 7Laboratory for Nuclear Science, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, MA, USA and the Bates Research and Engineering Center, Middleton MA, 8Laboratory for Nuclear Science, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, MA, USA and the Bates Research and Engineering Center, Middleton MA, 9Laboratory for Nuclear Science, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, MA, USA and the Bates Research and Engineering Center, Middleton MA, 10Laboratory for Nuclear Science, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, MA, USA and the Bates Research and Engineering Center, Middleton MA, 11Laboratory for Nuclear Science, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, MA, USA and the Bates Research and Engineering Center, Middleton MA, 12Laboratory for Nuclear Science, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, MA, USA and the Bates Research and Engineering Center, Middleton MA, 13Laboratory for Nuclear Science, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, MA, USA and the Bates Research and Engineering Center, Middleton MA, 14Laboratory for Nuclear Science, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, MA, USA and the Bates Research and Engineering Center, Middleton MA, 15Laboratory for Nuclear Science, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, MA, USA and the Bates Research and Engineering Center, Middleton MA, 16Laboratory for Nuclear Science, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, MA, USA and the Bates Research and Engineering Center, Middleton MA, 17Laboratory for Nuclear Science, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, MA, USA and the Bates Research and Engineering Center, Middleton MA, 18Laboratory for Nuclear Science, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, MA, USA and the Bates Research and Engineering Center, Middleton MA, 19Laboratory for Nuclear Science, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, MA, USA and the Bates Research and Engineering Center, Middleton MA, 20Laboratory for Nuclear Science, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, MA, USA and the Bates Research and Engineering Center, Middleton MA, 21Laboratory for Nuclear Science, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, MA, USA and the Bates Research and Engineering Center, Middleton MA, 22Laboratory for Nuclear Science, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, MA, USA and the Bates Research and Engineering Center, Middleton MA, 23Laboratory for Nuclear Science, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, MA, USA and the Bates Research and Engineering Center, Middleton MA, 24Jefferson Lab, Newport News, VA USA, 25Jefferson Lab, Newport News, VA USA, 26Jefferson Lab, Newport News, VA USA, 27Jefferson Lab, Newport News, VA USA, 28Jefferson Lab, Newport News, VA USA, 29Jefferson Lab, Newport News, VA USA, 30Jefferson Lab, Newport News, VA USA, 31Jefferson Lab, Newport News, VA USA, 32Jefferson Lab, Newport News, VA USA, 33Jefferson Lab, Newport News, VA USA, 34Jefferson Lab, Newport News, VA USA, 35Jefferson Lab, Newport News, VA USA, 36Jefferson Lab, Newport News, VA USA, 37Jefferson Lab, Newport News, VA USA, 38Jefferson Lab, Newport News, VA USA, 39Jefferson Lab, Newport News, VA USA, 40Jefferson Lab, Newport News, VA USA, 41Jefferson Lab, Newport News, VA USA, 42Jefferson Lab, Newport News, VA USA, 43Jefferson Lab, Newport News, VA USA, 44Jefferson Lab, Newport News, VA USA, 45Jefferson Lab, Newport News, VA USA, 46Physics Dept. U.C. Berkeley, Berkeley, CA USA, 47Institute for Research in Electronics and Applied Physics, University of Maryland, College Park, MD USA, 48Institute for Research in Electronics and Applied Physics, University of Maryland, College Park, MD USA, 49Physics Department, Arizona State University, Tempe, 50Physics Department, Arizona State University, Tempe, 51Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos NM USA, 52Physics Dept., Hampton University, Hampton, VA and Jefferson Lab, Newport News, VA USA, 53Physics Dept., Hampton University, Hampton, VA and Jefferson Lab, Newport News, VA USA, 54Physics Dept., Hampton University, Hampton, VA and Jefferson Lab, Newport News, VA USA, 55Physics Dept., Catholic University of America, Washington, DC USA, 56Physics Dept., Catholic University of America, Washington, DC USA, 57Physics Dept., Catholic University of America, Washington, DC USA, 58Temple University, Philadelphia PA USA, 59Temple University, Philadelphia PA USA, 60Temple University, Philadelphia PA USA, 61Temple University, Philadelphia PA USA, 62Temple University, Philadelphia PA USA, 63University Bonn, Bonn Germany, 64University Bonn, Bonn Germany, 65University Bonn, Bonn Germany, 66Physikalisches Institut Justus-Liebig-Universitt Giessen, Giessen Germany, 67Physikalisches Institut Justus-Liebig-Universitt Giessen, Giessen Germany

We give a short overview of the DarkLight detector concept which is designed to search for a heavy photon A' with a mass in the range 10 MeV/c^2 < m(A') < 90 MeV/c^2 and which decays to lepton pairs. We describe the intended operating environment, the Jefferson Laboratory free electon laser, and a way to extend DarkLight's reach using A' --> invisible decays. Read More

Pre-transitional disks are protoplanetary disks with a gapped disk structure, potentially indicating the presence of young planets in these systems. In order to explore the structure of these objects and their gap-opening mechanism, we observed the pre-transitional disk V1247 Orionis using the Very Large Telescope Interferometer, the Keck Interferometer, Keck-II, Gemini South, and IRTF. This allows us spatially resolve the AU-scale disk structure from near- to mid-infrared wavelengths (1. Read More

We present a detailed report of a measurement of the neutron $\beta$-asymmetry parameter $A_0$, the parity-violating angular correlation between the neutron spin and the decay electron momentum, performed with polarized ultracold neutrons (UCN). UCN were extracted from a pulsed spallation solid deuterium source and polarized via transport through a 7-T magnetic field. The polarized UCN were then transported through an adiabatic-fast-passage spin-flipper field region, prior to storage in a cylindrical decay volume situated within a 1-T $2 \times 2\pi$ solenoidal spectrometer. Read More

2012Jul

V1280 Sco is one of the slowest dust-forming nova ever historically observed. We performed multi-epoch high-spatial resolution observations of the circumstellar dusty environment of V1280 Sco to investigate the level of asymmetry of the ejecta We observed V1280 Sco in 2009, 2010 and 2011 using unprecedented high angular resolution techniques. We used the NACO/VLT adaptive optics system in the J, H and K bands, together with contemporaneous VISIR/VLT mid-IR imaging that resolved the dust envelope of V1280 Sco, and SINFONI/VLT observations secured in 2011. Read More

One of the key predictions of modeling from the IR excess of Herbig Ae stars is that for protoplanetary disks, where significant grain growth and settling has occurred, the dust disk has flattened to the point that it can be partially or largely shadowed by the innermost material at or near the dust sublimation radius. When the self-shadowing has already started, the outer disk is expected to be detected in scattered light only in the exceptional cases that the scale height of the dust disk at the sublimation radius is smaller than usual. High-contrast imaging combined with the IR spectral energy distribution allow us to measure the degree of flattening of the disk, as well as to determine the properties of the outer disk. Read More

We have used the Spitzer Space Telescope Infrared Spectrograph (IRS) to observe the 5-37 micron thermal emission of comet 73P/Schwassmann-Wachmann 3 (SW3), components B and C. We obtained low spectral resolution (R ~ 100) data over the entire wavelength interval, along with images at 16 and 22 micron. These observations provided an unprecedented opportunity to study nearly pristine material from the surface and what was until recently the interior of an ecliptic comet - cometary surface having experienced only two prior perihelion passages, and including material that was totally fresh. Read More

We present mid-infrared spectra and images from the GEMINI-N (+Michelle) observations of fragments SW3-[B] and SW3-[C] of the ecliptic (Jupiter Family) comet 73P/Schwassmann-Wachmann 3 pre-perihelion. We observed fragment B soon after an outburst event (between 2006 April 16 - 26 UT) and detected crystalline silicates. The mineralogy of both fragments was dominated by amorphous carbon and amorphous pyroxene. Read More

2010Nov
Authors: T. Abe, I. Adachi, K. Adamczyk, S. Ahn, H. Aihara, K. Akai, M. Aloi, L. Andricek, K. Aoki, Y. Arai, A. Arefiev, K. Arinstein, Y. Arita, D. M. Asner, V. Aulchenko, T. Aushev, T. Aziz, A. M. Bakich, V. Balagura, Y. Ban, E. Barberio, T. Barvich, K. Belous, T. Bergauer, V. Bhardwaj, B. Bhuyan, S. Blyth, A. Bondar, G. Bonvicini, A. Bozek, M. Bracko, J. Brodzicka, O. Brovchenko, T. E. Browder, G. Cao, M. -C. Chang, P. Chang, Y. Chao, V. Chekelian, A. Chen, K. -F. Chen, P. Chen, B. G. Cheon, C. -C. Chiang, R. Chistov, K. Cho, S. -K. Choi, K. Chung, A. Comerma, M. Cooney, D. E. Cowley, T. Critchlow, J. Dalseno, M. Danilov, A. Dieguez, A. Dierlamm, M. Dillon, J. Dingfelder, R. Dolenec, Z. Dolezal, Z. Drasal, A. Drutskoy, W. Dungel, D. Dutta, S. Eidelman, A. Enomoto, D. Epifanov, S. Esen, J. E. Fast, M. Feindt, M. Fernandez Garcia, T. Fifield, P. Fischer, J. Flanagan, S. Fourletov, J. Fourletova, L. Freixas, A. Frey, M. Friedl, R. Fruehwirth, H. Fujii, M. Fujikawa, Y. Fukuma, Y. Funakoshi, K. Furukawa, J. Fuster, N. Gabyshev, A. Gaspar de Valenzuela Cueto, A. Garmash, L. Garrido, Ch. Geisler, I. Gfall, Y. M. Goh, B. Golob, I. Gorton, R. Grzymkowski, H. Guo, H. Ha, J. Haba, K. Hara, T. Hara, T. Haruyama, K. Hayasaka, K. Hayashi, H. Hayashii, M. Heck, S. Heindl, C. Heller, T. Hemperek, T. Higuchi, Y. Horii, W. -S. Hou, Y. B. Hsiung, C. -H. Huang, S. Hwang, H. J. Hyun, Y. Igarashi, C. Iglesias, Y. Iida, T. Iijima, M. Imamura, K. Inami, C. Irmler, M. Ishizuka, K. Itagaki, R. Itoh, M. Iwabuchi, G. Iwai, M. Iwai, M. Iwasaki, M. Iwasaki, Y. Iwasaki, T. Iwashita, S. Iwata, H. Jang, X. Ji, T. Jinno, M. Jones, T. Julius, T. Kageyama, D. H. Kah, H. Kakuno, T. Kamitani, K. Kanazawa, P. Kapusta, S. U. Kataoka, N. Katayama, M. Kawai, Y. Kawai, T. Kawasaki, J. Kennedy, H. Kichimi, M. Kikuchi, C. Kiesling, B. K. Kim, G. N. Kim, H. J. Kim, H. O. Kim, J. -B. Kim, J. H. Kim, M. J. Kim, S. K. Kim, K. T. Kim, T. Y. Kim, K. Kinoshita, K. Kishi, B. Kisielewski, K. Kleese van Dam, J. Knopf, B. R. Ko, M. Koch, P. Kodys, C. Koffmane, Y. Koga, T. Kohriki, S. Koike, H. Koiso, Y. Kondo, S. Korpar, R. T. Kouzes, Ch. Kreidl, M. Kreps, P. Krizan, P. Krokovny, H. Krueger, A. Kruth, W. Kuhn, T. Kuhr, R. Kumar, T. Kumita, S. Kupper, A. Kuzmin, P. Kvasnicka, Y. -J. Kwon, C. Lacasta, J. S. Lange, I. -S. Lee, M. J. Lee, M. W. Lee, S. -H. Lee, M. Lemarenko, J. Li, W. D. Li, Y. Li, J. Libby, A. Limosani, C. Liu, H. Liu, Y. Liu, Z. Liu, D. Liventsev, A. Lopez Virto, Y. Makida, Z. P. Mao, C. Marinas, M. Masuzawa, D. Matvienko, W. Mitaroff, K. Miyabayashi, H. Miyata, Y. Miyazaki, T. Miyoshi, R. Mizuk, G. B. Mohanty, D. Mohapatra, A. Moll, T. Mori, A. Morita, Y. Morita, H. -G. Moser, D. Moya Martin, T. Mueller, D. Muenchow, J. Murakami, S. S. Myung, T. Nagamine, I. Nakamura, T. T. Nakamura, E. Nakano, H. Nakano, M. Nakao, H. Nakazawa, S. -H. Nam, Z. Natkaniec, E. Nedelkovska, K. Negishi, S. Neubauer, C. Ng, J. Ninkovic, S. Nishida, K. Nishimura, E. Novikov, T. Nozaki, S. Ogawa, K. Ohmi, Y. Ohnishi, T. Ohshima, N. Ohuchi, K. Oide, S. L. Olsen, M. Ono, Y. Ono, Y. Onuki, W. Ostrowicz, H. Ozaki, P. Pakhlov, G. Pakhlova, H. Palka, H. Park, H. K. Park, L. S. Peak, T. Peng, I. Peric, M. Pernicka, R. Pestotnik, M. Petric, L. E. Piilonen, A. Poluektov, M. Prim, K. Prothmann, K. Regimbal, B. Reisert, R. H. Richter, J. Riera-Babures, A. Ritter, A. Ritter, M. Ritter, M. Roehrken, J. Rorie, M. Rosen, M. Rozanska, L. Ruckman, S. Rummel, V. Rusinov, R. M. Russell, S. Ryu, H. Sahoo, K. Sakai, Y. Sakai, L. Santelj, T. Sasaki, N. Sato, Y. Sato, J. Scheirich, J. Schieck, C. Schwanda, A. J. Schwartz, B. Schwenker, A. Seljak, K. Senyo, O. -S. Seon, M. E. Sevior, M. Shapkin, V. Shebalin, C. P. Shen, H. Shibuya, S. Shiizuka, J. -G. Shiu, B. Shwartz, F. Simon, H. J. Simonis, J. B. Singh, R. Sinha, M. Sitarz, P. Smerkol, A. Sokolov, E. Solovieva, S. Stanic, M. Staric, J. Stypula, Y. Suetsugu, S. Sugihara, T. Sugimura, K. Sumisawa, T. Sumiyoshi, K. Suzuki, S. Y. Suzuki, H. Takagaki, F. Takasaki, H. Takeichi, Y. Takubo, M. Tanaka, S. Tanaka, N. Taniguchi, E. Tarkovsky, G. Tatishvili, M. Tawada, G. N. Taylor, Y. Teramoto, I. Tikhomirov, K. Trabelsi, T. Tsuboyama, K. Tsunada, Y. -C. Tu, T. Uchida, S. Uehara, K. Ueno, T. Uglov, Y. Unno, S. Uno, P. Urquijo, Y. Ushiroda, Y. Usov, S. Vahsen, M. Valentan, P. Vanhoefer, G. Varner, K. E. Varvell, P. Vazquez, I. Vila, E. Vilella, A. Vinokurova, J. Visniakov, M. Vos, C. H. Wang, J. Wang, M. -Z. Wang, P. Wang, A. Wassatch, M. Watanabe, Y. Watase, T. Weiler, N. Wermes, R. E. Wescott, E. White, J. Wicht, L. Widhalm, K. M. Williams, E. Won, H. Xu, B. D. Yabsley, H. Yamamoto, H. Yamaoka, Y. Yamaoka, M. Yamauchi, Y. Yin, H. Yoon, J. Yu, C. Z. Yuan, Y. Yusa, D. Zander, M. Zdybal, Z. P. Zhang, J. Zhao, L. Zhao, Z. Zhao, V. Zhilich, P. Zhou, V. Zhulanov, T. Zivko, A. Zupanc, O. Zyukova

The Belle detector at the KEKB electron-positron collider has collected almost 1 billion Y(4S) events in its decade of operation. Super-KEKB, an upgrade of KEKB is under construction, to increase the luminosity by two orders of magnitude during a three-year shutdown, with an ultimate goal of 8E35 /cm^2 /s luminosity. To exploit the increased luminosity, an upgrade of the Belle detector has been proposed. Read More

Supernova (SN) 2008ax in NGC 4490 was discovered within hours after shock breakout, presenting the rare opportunity to study a core-collapse SN beginning with the initial envelope-cooling phase immediately following shock breakout. We present an extensive sequence of optical and near-infrared spectra, as well as three epochs of optical spectropolarimetry. Our initial spectra, taken two days after shock breakout, are dominated by hydrogen Balmer lines at high velocity. Read More

We present near infrared spectroscopy of the recurrent nova RS Oph obtained on several occasions after its latest outburst in 2006 February. The 1-5 mircon spectra are dominated by the red giant, but the H I, He I, and coronal lines present during the eruption are present in all our observations. From the fits of the computed infrared spectral energy distributions to the observed fluxes we find T_eff=4200+/-200,K for the red giant. Read More

We present the results of high-resolution optical spectroscopy, low-resolution near-IR spectroscopy and near-infrared speckle interferometry of the massive young stellar object candidate V645 Cyg, acquired to refine its fundamental parameters and the properties of its circumstellar envelope. Speckle interferometry in the $H$- and $K$-bands and an optical spectrum in the range 5200--6680 \AA with a spectral resolving power of $R$ = 60 000 were obtained at the 6-m telescope of the Russian Academy of Sciences. Another optical spectrum in the range 4300--10500 \AA with $R$ = 79 000 was obtained at the 3. Read More

In late 2003, the young eruptive variable star V1647 Orionis optically brightened by over 5 magnitudes, stayed bright for around 26 months, and then decline to its pre-outburst level. In August 2008 the star was reported to have unexpectedly brightened yet again and we herein present the first detailed observations of this new outburst. Photometrically, the star is now as bright as it ever was following the 2003 eruption. Read More

The optical afterglow of long-duration GRB 071003 is among the brightest yet to be detected from any GRB, with R ~ 12 mag in KAIT observations starting 42 s after the GRB trigger, including filtered detections during prompt emission. However, our high S/N ratio afterglow spectrum displays only extremely weak absorption lines at what we argue is the host redshift of z = 1.60435 - in contrast to the three other, much stronger Mg II absorption systems observed at lower redshifts. Read More

2008Apr
Affiliations: 1MAO, 2Keele Univ, 3JAC, 4MAO, 5Minnesota Univ, 6Aerospace Corp, 7Aerospace Corp, 8Aerospace Corp, Brigham Young Univ, 9Aerospace Corp
Category: Astrophysics

The recurrent nova RS Oph undergoes nova eruptions every ~ 10-20years as a result of thermonuclear runaway on the surface of a white dwarf close to the Chandrasekhar limit. Both the progress of the eruption, and its aftermath, depend on the (poorly known) composition of the red giant in the RS Oph system. Our aim is to understand better the effect of the giant secondary on the recurrent nova eruption. Read More

Infrared photometry and spectroscopy covering a time span of a quarter century are presented for HD 31648 (MWC 480) and HD 163296 (MWC 275). Both are isolated Herbig Ae stars that exhibit signs of active accretion, including driving bipolar flows with embedded Herbig-Haro (HH) objects. HD 163296 was found to be relatively quiescent photometrically in its inner disk region, with the exception of a major increase in emitted flux in a broad wavelength region centered near 3 microns in 2002. Read More

2007Oct
Affiliations: 1Keele University, 2Minnesota, 3Minnesota, 4Keele, 5NASA Goddard Space Flight Center, 6Liverpool John Moores, 7Manchester, 8CfA, 9Central Lancs, 10Gemini, 11Minnesota, 12JAC Hawaii, 13Landessternwarte Heidelberg, 14Aerospace Corporation, 15Arizona State, 16Manchestsr, 17Leicester, 18Leicester, 19Aerospace Corporation, 20Aerospace Corporation, 21Steward Observatory, 22Arizona State, 23Keele
Category: Astrophysics

We present further Spitzer Space Telescope observations of the recurrent nova RS Ophiuchi, obtained over the period 208-430 days after the 2006 eruption. The later Spitzer IRS data show that the line emission and free-free continuum emission reported earlier is declining, revealing incontrovertible evidence for the presence of silicate emission features at 9.7 and 18microns. Read More

2007May
Affiliations: 1Keele, 2Minnesota, 3Minnesota, 4Minnesota, 5Aerospace Corporation, 6Aerospace Corporation, 7Aerospace Corporation, 8UKIRT, 9Liverpool John Moores, 10Liverpool John Moores, 11Central Lancs, 12Gemini, 13Manchester, 14Manchester, 15Arizon State, 16Arizon State, 17CfA, 18Leicester, 19Leicester, 20Steward Observatory, 21Landessternwarte
Category: Astrophysics

We present Spitzer Space Telescope and complementary ground-based infrared observations of the recurrent nova RS Ophiuchi, obtained over the period 64-111 days after the 2006 eruption. The Spitzer IRS data show a rich emission line spectrum superimposed on a free-free continuum. The presence of fine structure and coronal infrared lines lead us to deduce that there are at least two temperatures (1. Read More

We report optical photometry and optical through mid-infrared spectroscopy of the classical nova V1186 Sco. This slowly developing nova had an complex light curve with multiple secondary peaks similar to those seen in PW Vul. The time to decline 2 magnitudes, t$_2$, was 20 days but the erratic nature of the light curve makes determination of intrinsic properties based on the decline time (e. Read More

2006Sep
Affiliations: 1Keele University, 2JACH, 3University of Hawaii, 4University of Tokyo, 5Tokyo, 6Liverpool John Moores, 7University of Central Lancs, 8Gemini Observatory, 9University of Minnesota, 10Minnesota, 11Aerospace Corporation, 12Aerospace Corporation, 13Aerospace Corporation, 14University of Manchester, 15Arizona State, 16Manchester, 17Arizona State, 18CfA, 19University of Leicester, 20University of Leicester, 21JACH, 22Steward Observatory, 23Landessternewarte Heidelberg
Category: Astrophysics

We present infrared spectroscopy of the recurrent nova RS Ophiuchi, obtained 11.81, 20.75 and 55. Read More

We report 8- to 13-micron spectral observations of Neptune and Uranus from the NASA Infrared Telescope Facility spanning more than a decade. The spectroscopic data indicate a steady increase in Neptune's mean atmospheric 12-micron ethane emission from 1985 to 2003, followed by a slight decrease in 2004. The simplest explanation for the intensity variation is an increase in stratospheric effective temperature from 155 +/- 3 K in 1985 to 176 +/- 3 K in 2003 (an average rate of 1. Read More

We present new observations of the FUV (1100-2200 Angstrom) radiation field and the near- to mid-IR (3--13.5 micron) spectral energy distribution (SED) of a sample of T Tauri stars selected on the basis of bright molecular disks (GM Aur, DM Tau, LkCa15). In each source we find evidence for Ly alpha induced H2 fluorescence and an additional source of FUV continuum emission below 1700 Angstroms. Read More

We report 3 - 13 micron spectroscopy of 4 comets observed between August 2002 and February 2003: C/2002 O4 (Honig) on August 1, 2002, C/2002 V1 (NEAT) on Jan. 9 and 10, 2003, C/2002 X5 (Kudo-Fujikawa) on Jan. 9 and 10, 2003, and C/2002 Y1 (Juels-Holvorcem) on Feb. Read More

2000Aug
Affiliations: 1University of Cincinnati, 2Aerospace Corp., 3Aerospace Corp.
Category: Astrophysics

The TW Hydrae Association is the nearest young stellar association. Among its members are HD 98800, HR 4796A, and TW Hydrae itself, the nearest known classical T Tauri star. We have observed these three stars spectroscopically between 3 and 13 microns. Read More