P. Jones - University of New South Wales

P. Jones
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Name
P. Jones
Affiliation
University of New South Wales
City
Sydney
Country
Australia

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Astrophysics of Galaxies (21)
 
High Energy Astrophysical Phenomena (9)
 
High Energy Physics - Theory (6)
 
Solar and Stellar Astrophysics (5)
 
Nuclear Experiment (4)
 
General Relativity and Quantum Cosmology (2)
 
Physics - Optics (2)
 
Mathematics - Group Theory (2)
 
Mathematics - Classical Analysis and ODEs (2)
 
Physics - Statistical Mechanics (1)
 
Physics - Computational Physics (1)
 
Physics - Soft Condensed Matter (1)
 
Physics - Materials Science (1)
 
High Energy Physics - Experiment (1)
 
Physics - Instrumentation and Detectors (1)
 
Computer Science - Numerical Analysis (1)
 
Nuclear Theory (1)
 
Instrumentation and Methods for Astrophysics (1)
 
High Energy Physics - Phenomenology (1)

Publications Authored By P. Jones

We introduce LRT, a new Lagrangian-based ReachTube computation algorithm that conservatively approximates the set of reachable states of a nonlinear dynamical system. LRT makes use of the Cauchy-Green stretching factor (SF), which is derived from an over-approximation of the gradient of the solution flows. The SF measures the discrepancy between two states propagated by the system solution from two initial states lying in a well-defined region, thereby allowing LRT to compute a reachtube with a ball-overestimate in a metric where the computed enclosure is as tight as possible. Read More

The quenching of the experimental spectroscopic factor for proton emission from the short-lived $d_{3/2}$ isomeric state in $^{151m}$Lu was a long-standing problem. In the present work, proton emission from this isomer has been reinvestigated in an experiment at the Accelerator Laboratory of the University of Jyv\"{a}skyl\"{a}. The proton-decay energy and half-life of this isomer were measured to be 1295(5) keV and 15. Read More

Different combinations of input parameters to filament identification algorithms, such as Disperse and FilFinder, produce numerous different output skeletons. The skeletons are a one pixel wide representation of the filamentary structure in the original input image. However, these output skeletons may not necessarily be a good representation of that structure. Read More

The H2O Southern Galactic Plane Survey (HOPS) has mapped 100 square degrees of the Galactic plane for water masers and thermal molecular line emission using the 22-m Mopra telescope. We describe the automated spectral-line fitting pipelines used to determine the properties of emission detected in HOPS datacubes, and use these to derive the physical and kinematic properties of gas in the survey. A combination of the angular resolution, sensitivity, velocity resolution and high critical density of lines targeted make the HOPS data cubes ideally suited to finding precursor clouds to the most massive and dense stellar clusters in the Galaxy. Read More

It is shown that the time-variability inherent in the ion-proton polar cap leads naturally to growth of Langmuir modes on narrow bundles of magnetic flux lines and that the observed size of micropulses is consistent with the smallest such bundle that can plausibly support the growth of the modes. The polarization of integrated profiles is revisited, specifically, the pi/2 position-angle jumps that are frequently observed accompanied by a zero in polarization. The fact that radiation emitted above ion-proton polar caps is not tangential to the local flux lines but has a finite angular distribution proves to be the essence of understanding this phenomenon as is a constraint on the shape of the polar cap. Read More

There is good evidence that electron-positron pair formation is not present in that section of the pulsar open magnetosphere which is the source of coherent radio emission, but the possibility of two-photon pair creation in an outer gap remains. Calculation of transition rates for this process based on measured whole-surface temperatures, combined with a survey of gamma-ray, X-ray and optical luminosities, expressed per primary beam lepton, shows that few Fermi LAT pulsars have significant outer-gap pair creation. For radio-loud pulsars with positive polar-cap corotational charge density and an ion-proton plasma there must be an outward flow of electrons from some other part of the magnetosphere to maintain a constant net charge on the star. Read More

We report on high spatial resolution observations, using the Australia Telescope Compact Array (ATCA), of ground-state OH masers. These observations were carried out toward 196 pointing centres previously identified in the Southern Parkes Large-Area Survey in Hydroxyl (SPLASH) pilot region, between Galactic longitudes of $334^{\circ}$ and $344^{\circ}$ and Galactic latitudes of $-2^{\circ}$ and $+2^{\circ}$. Supplementing our data with data from the MAGMO (Mapping the Galactic Magnetic field through OH masers) survey, we find maser emission towards 175 of the 196 target fields. Read More

We study the possibility that massless particles, such as photons, are produced by a gravitational wave. That such a process should occur is implied by tree-level, Feynman diagrams such as two gravitons turning into two photons i.e. Read More

Isospin properties of dipole excitations in 74 Ge are investigated using the ({\alpha},{\alpha}'{\gamma}) reaction and compared to ({\gamma},{\gamma}) data. The results indicate that the dipole excitations in the energy region of 6 to 9 MeV adhere to the scenario of the recently found splitting of the region of dipole excitations into two separated parts: one at low energy, being populated by both isoscalar and isovector probes, and the other at high energy, excited only by the electromagnetic probe. Relativistic quasiparticle time blocking approximation (RQTBA) calculations show a reduction in the isoscalar E1 strength with an increase in excitation energy, which is consistent with the measurement. Read More

Stars form in dense, dusty structures, which are embedded in larger clumps of molecular clouds often showing a clear filamentary structure on large scales (> 1pc). One of the best-studied regions in the Hi-GAL survey can be observed toward the l=224deg field. Here, a filamentary region has been studied and it has been found that protostellar clumps are mostly located along the main filament, whereas starless clumps are detected off this filament and are instead found on secondary, less prominent filaments. Read More

We have analysed the chemical and kinematic properties of the 20 and 50 km s$^{-1}$ molecular clouds in the Central Molecular Zone of the Milky Way Galaxy, as well as those of the molecular ridge bridging these two clouds. Our work has utilized 37 molecular transitions in the 0.65, 3 and 7-mm wavebands, from the Mopra and NANTEN2 telescopes. Read More

Three bright molecular line sources in G333 have recently been shown to exhibit signatures of infall. We describe a molecular line radiative transfer modelling process which is required to extract the infall signature from Mopra and Nanten2 data. The observed line profiles differ greatly between individual sources but are reproduced well by variations upon a common unified model where the outflow viewing angle is the most significant difference between the sources. Read More

Evidence derived with minimal assumptions from existing published observations is presented to show that an ion-proton plasma is the source of radio-frequency emission in millisecond and in normal isolated pulsars. There is no primary involvement of electron-positron pairs. This conclusion has also been reached by studies of the plasma composition based on well-established particle-physics processes in neutron stars with positive polar-cap corotational charge density. Read More

An algebra has the Howson property if the intersection of any two finitely generated subalgebras is finitely generated. A simple necessary and sufficient condition is given for the Howson property to hold on an inverse semigroup with finitely many idempotents. In addition, it is shown that any monogenic inverse semigroup has the Howson property. Read More

2016Mar
Authors: STAR Collaboration, B. Abelev, L. Adamczyk, J. K. Adkins, G. Agakishiev, M. M. Aggarwal, Z. Ahammed, I. Alekseev, A. Aparin, D. Arkhipkin, E. C. Aschenauer, A. Attri, G. S. Averichev, X. Bai, V. Bairathi, L. S. Barnby, R. Bellwied, A. Bhasin, A. K. Bhati, P. Bhattarai, J. Bielcik, J. Bielcikova, L. C. Bland, M. Bombara, I. G. Bordyuzhin, J. Bouchet, J. D. Brandenburg, A. V. Brandin, I. Bunzarov, J. Butterworth, H. Caines, M. Calderón de la Barca Sánchez, J. M. Campbell, D. Cebra, I. Chakaberia, P. Chaloupka, Z. Chang, A. Chatterjee, S. Chattopadhyay, J. H. Chen, X. Chen, J. Cheng, M. Cherney, W. Christie, G. Contin, H. J. Crawford, S. Das, L. C. De Silva, R. R. Debbe, T. G. Dedovich, J. Deng, A. A. Derevschikov, B. di Ruzza, L. Didenko, C. Dilks, X. Dong, J. L. Drachenberg, J. E. Draper, C. M. Du, L. E. Dunkelberger, J. C. Dunlop, L. G. Efimov, J. Engelage, G. Eppley, R. Esha, O. Evdokimov, O. Eyser, R. Fatemi, S. Fazio, P. Federic, J. Fedorisin, Z. Feng, P. Filip, Y. Fisyak, C. E. Flores, L. Fulek, C. A. Gagliardi, L. Gaillard, D. Garand F. Geurts, A. Gibson, M. Girard, L. Greiner, D. Grosnick, D. S. Gunarathne, Y. Guo, S. Gupta, A. Gupta, W. Guryn, A. I. Hamad, A. Hamed, R. Haque, J. W. Harris, L. He, S. Heppelmann, S. Heppelmann, A. Hirsch, G. W. Hoffmann, S. Horvat, T. Huang, X. Huang, B. Huang, H. Z. Huang, P. Huck, T. J. Humanic, G. Igo, W. W. Jacobs, H. Jang, A. Jentsch, J. Jia, K. Jiang, P. G. Jones, E. G. Judd, S. Kabana, D. Kalinkin, K. Kang, K. Kauder, H. W. Ke, D. Keane, A. Kechechyan, Z. H. Khan, D. P. Kikoła, I. Kisel, A. Kisiel, L. Kochenda, D. D. Koetke, L. K. Kosarzewski, A. F. Kraishan, P. Kravtsov, K. Krueger, L. Kumar, M. A. C. Lamont, J. M. Landgraf, K. D. Landry, J. Lauret, A. Lebedev, R. Lednicky, J. H. Lee, X. Li, C. Li, X. Li, Y. Li, W. Li, T. Lin, M. A. Lisa, F. Liu, T. Ljubicic, W. J. Llope, M. Lomnitz, R. S. Longacre, X. Luo, R. Ma, G. L. Ma, Y. G. Ma, L. Ma, N. Magdy, R. Majka, A. Manion, S. Margetis, C. Markert, H. S. Matis, D. McDonald, S. McKinzie, K. Meehan, J. C. Mei, N. G. Minaev, S. Mioduszewski, D. Mishra, B. Mohanty, M. M. Mondal, D. A. Morozov, M. K. Mustafa, B. K. Nandi, C. Nattrass, Md. Nasim, T. K. Nayak, G. Nigmatkulov, T. Niida, L. V. Nogach, S. Y. Noh, J. Novak, S. B. Nurushev, G. Odyniec, A. Ogawa, K. Oh, V. A. Okorokov, D. Olvitt Jr., B. S. Page, R. Pak, Y. X. Pan, Y. Pandit, Y. Panebratsev, B. Pawlik, H. Pei, C. Perkins, P. Pile, J. Pluta, K. Poniatowska, J. Porter, M. Posik, A. M. Poskanzer, N. K. Pruthi, J. Putschke, H. Qiu, A. Quintero, S. Ramachandran, S. Raniwala, R. Raniwala, R. L. Ray, H. G. Ritter, J. B. Roberts, O. V. Rogachevskiy, J. L. Romero, L. Ruan, J. Rusnak, O. Rusnakova, N. R. Sahoo, P. K. Sahu, I. Sakrejda, S. Salur, J. Sandweiss, A. Sarkar, J. Schambach, R. P. Scharenberg, A. M. Schmah, W. B. Schmidke, N. Schmitz, J. Seger, P. Seyboth, N. Shah, E. Shahaliev, P. V. Shanmuganathan, M. Shao, A. Sharma, B. Sharma, M. K. Sharma, W. Q. Shen, Z. Shi, S. S. Shi, Q. Y. Shou, E. P. Sichtermann, R. Sikora, M. Simko, S. Singha, M. J. Skoby, N. Smirnov, D. Smirnov, W. Solyst, L. Song, P. Sorensen, H. M. Spinka, B. Srivastava, T. D. S. Stanislaus, M. Stepanov, R. Stock, M. Strikhanov, B. Stringfellow, M. Sumbera, B. Summa, Z. Sun, X. M. Sun, Y. Sun, B. Surrow, D. N. Svirida, Z. Tang, A. H. Tang, T. Tarnowsky, A. Tawfik, J. Thäder, J. H. Thomas, A. R. Timmins, D. Tlusty, T. Todoroki, M. Tokarev, S. Trentalange, R. E. Tribble, P. Tribedy, S. K. Tripathy, O. D. Tsai, T. Ullrich, D. G. Underwood, I. Upsal, G. Van Buren, G. van Nieuwenhuizen, M. Vandenbroucke, R. Varma, A. N. Vasiliev, R. Vertesi, F. Videbæ, S. Vokal, S. A. Voloshin, A. Vossen, F. Wang, G. Wang, J. S. Wang, H. Wang, Y. Wang, Y. Wang, G. Webb, J. C. Webb, L. Wen, G. D. Westfall, H. Wieman, S. W. Wissink, R. Witt, Y. Wu, Z. G. Xiao, W. Xie, G. Xie, K. Xin, Y. F. Xu, Q. H. Xu, N. Xu, H. Xu, Z. Xu, J. Xu, S. Yang, Y. Yang, Y. Yang, C. Yang, Y. Yang, Q. Yang, Z. Ye, Z. Ye, P. Yepes, L. Yi, K. Yip, I. -K. Yoo, N. Yu, H. Zbroszczyk, W. Zha, X. P. Zhang, Y. Zhang, J. Zhang, J. Zhang, S. Zhang, S. Zhang, Z. Zhang, J. B. Zhang, J. Zhao, C. Zhong, L. Zhou, X. Zhu, Y. Zoulkarneeva, M. Zyzak

We present measurements of the near-side of triggered di-hadron correlations using neutral strange baryons ($\Lambda$, $\bar{\Lambda}$) and mesons ($K^0_S$) at intermediate transverse momentum (3 $<$ $p_T$ $<$ 6 GeV/$c$) to look for possible flavor and baryon/meson dependence. This study is performed in $d$+Au, Cu+Cu and Au+Au collisions at $\sqrt{s_{{NN}}}$ = 200 GeV measured by the STAR experiment at RHIC. The near-side di-hadron correlation contains two structures, a peak which is narrow in azimuth and pseudorapidity consistent with correlations due to jet fragmentation, and a correlation in azimuth which is broad in pseudorapidity. Read More

The R Coronae Australis dark cloud is one of the closest star-forming regions to the Sun. The cloud is known to be very active in star formation, harboring many Herbig-Haro objects (HHs) and Molecular Hydrogen emission-line Objects (MHOs). In this work we present results from molecular observations (a $5. Read More

We explore holographic entanglement entropy in ten-dimensional supergravity solutions. It has been proposed that entanglement entropy can be computed in such top-down models using minimal surfaces which asymptotically wrap the compact part of the geometry. We show explicitly in a wide range of examples that the holographic entanglement entropy thus computed agrees with the entanglement entropy computed using the Ryu-Takayanagi formula from the lower-dimensional Einstein metric obtained from reduction over the compact space. Read More

Using spectral-line observations of HNCO, N2H+, and HNC, we investigate the kinematics of dense gas in the central ~250 pc of the Galaxy. We present SCOUSE (Semi-automated multi-COmponent Universal Spectral-line fitting Engine), a line fitting algorithm designed to analyse large volumes of spectral-line data efficiently and systematically. Unlike techniques which do not account for complex line profiles, SCOUSE accurately describes the {l, b, v_LSR} distribution of CMZ gas, which is asymmetric about Sgr A* in both position and velocity. Read More

In this paper we focus on measures defined on dyadic sets which are sets with an ordered binary tree of subsets. An example is the partition of the unit interval into dyadic subintervals. The measures are defined on the sigma algebra generated by the subsets in the binary tree. Read More

We present results from a study of the dense circum-nuclear molecular gas of starburst galaxies. The study aims to investigate the interplay between starbursts, active galactic nuclei and molecular gas. We characterise the dense gas traced by HCN, HCO$^{+}$ and HNC and examine its kinematics in the circum-nuclear regions of nine starburst galaxies observed with the Australia Telescope Compact Array. Read More

It has been argued in previous papers that an ion-proton plasma is formed at the polar caps of neutron stars with positive polar-cap corotational charge density. The present paper does not offer a theory of the development of turbulence from the unstable Langmuir modes that grow in the outward accelerated plasma, but attempts to describe in qualitative terms the factors relevant to the emission of polarized radiation at frequencies below 1 - 10 GHz. The work of Karastergiou and Johnston is of particular importance in this respect because it demonstrates in high-resolution measurements of the profiles of 17 pulsars that the relative phase retardation between the O- and E-modes of the plasma is no greater than of the order of pi. Read More

We have used a plane-wave expansion method to theoretically study the far-field head-media optical interaction in HAMR. For the ASTC media stack specifically, we notice the outstanding sensitivity related to interlayer's optical thickness for media reflection and magnetic layer's light absorption. With 10-nm interlayer thickness change, the recording layer absorption can be changed by more than 25%. Read More

We present results obtained towards the HII regions N159, N166, and N132 from the emission of several molecular lines in the 345 GHz window. Using ASTE we mapped a 2.4' $\times$ 2. Read More

Dynamic AdS/QCD is a modification of AdS/QCD that includes the running of the anomalous dimension of the q-bar q quark bilinear and in which the generation of the constituent quark mass plays the role of an IR wall. The model allows one to move away smoothly from the controlled spectrum of the N=2 super Yang-Mills theory of the D3/probe-D7 system to more QCD-like theories with chiral symmetry breaking. We investigate soft wall behaviour in the model that gives Regge trajectories with M_{n,s}^2 ~ n,s. Read More

2015Aug
Authors: SNO+ Collaboration1, :2, S. Andringa3, E. Arushanova4, S. Asahi5, M. Askins6, D. J. Auty7, A. R. Back8, Z. Barnard9, N. Barros10, E. W. Beier11, A. Bialek12, S. D. Biller13, E. Blucher14, R. Bonventre15, D. Braid16, E. Caden17, E. Callaghan18, J. Caravaca19, J. Carvalho20, L. Cavalli21, D. Chauhan22, M. Chen23, O. Chkvorets24, K. Clark25, B. Cleveland26, I. T. Coulter27, D. Cressy28, X. Dai29, C. Darrach30, B. Davis-Purcell31, R. Deen32, M. M. Depatie33, F. Descamps34, F. Di Lodovico35, N. Duhaime36, F. Duncan37, J. Dunger38, E. Falk39, N. Fatemighomi40, R. Ford41, P. Gorel42, C. Grant43, S. Grullon44, E. Guillian45, A. L. Hallin46, D. Hallman47, S. Hans48, J. Hartnell49, P. Harvey50, M. Hedayatipour51, W. J. Heintzelman52, R. L. Helmer53, B. Hreljac54, J. Hu55, T. Iida56, C. M. Jackson57, N. A. Jelley58, C. Jillings59, C. Jones60, P. G. Jones61, K. Kamdin62, T. Kaptanoglu63, J. Kaspar64, P. Keener65, P. Khaghani66, L. Kippenbrock67, J. R. Klein68, R. Knapik69, J. N. Kofron70, L. L. Kormos71, S. Korte72, C. Kraus73, C. B. Krauss74, K. Labe75, I. Lam76, C. Lan77, B. J. Land78, S. Langrock79, A. LaTorre80, I. Lawson81, G. M. Lefeuvre82, E. J. Leming83, J. Lidgard84, X. Liu85, Y. Liu86, V. Lozza87, S. Maguire88, A. Maio89, K. Majumdar90, S. Manecki91, J. Maneira92, E. Marzec93, A. Mastbaum94, N. McCauley95, A. B. McDonald96, J. E. McMillan97, P. Mekarski98, C. Miller99, Y. Mohan100, E. Mony101, M. J. Mottram102, V. Novikov103, H. M. O'Keeffe104, E. O'Sullivan105, G. D. Orebi Gann106, M. J. Parnell107, S. J. M. Peeters108, T. Pershing109, Z. Petriw110, G. Prior111, J. C. Prouty112, S. Quirk113, A. Reichold114, A. Robertson115, J. Rose116, R. Rosero117, P. M. Rost118, J. Rumleskie119, M. A. Schumaker120, M. H. Schwendener121, D. Scislowski122, J. Secrest123, M. Seddighin124, L. Segui125, S. Seibert126, T. Shantz127, T. M. Shokair128, L. Sibley129, J. R. Sinclair130, K. Singh131, P. Skensved132, A. Soerensen133, T. Sonley134, R. Stainforth135, M. Strait136, M. I. Stringer137, R. Svoboda138, J. Tatar139, L. Tian140, N. Tolich141, J. Tseng142, H. W. C. Tseung143, R. Van Berg144, E. Vázquez-Jáuregui145, C. Virtue146, B. von Krosigk147, J. M. G. Walker148, M. Walker149, O. Wasalski150, J. Waterfield151, R. F. White152, J. R. Wilson153, T. J. Winchester154, A. Wright155, M. Yeh156, T. Zhao157, K. Zuber158
Affiliations: 1Laboratório de Instrumentaçao e Física Experimental de Partículas, 2Laboratório de Instrumentaçao e Física Experimental de Partículas, 3Laboratório de Instrumentaçao e Física Experimental de Partículas, 4Queen Mary, University of London, School of Physics and Astronomy, London, UK, 5Queen's University, Department of Physics, Engineering Physics and Astronomy, Kingston, ON, Canada, 6University of California, Davis, CA, USA, 7University of Alberta, Department of Physics, Edmonton, AB, Canada, 8Queen Mary, University of London, School of Physics and Astronomy, London, UK, 9Laurentian University, Sudbury, ON, Canada, 10Laboratório de Instrumentaçao e Física Experimental de Partículas, 11University of Pennsylvania, Department of Physics and Astronomy, Philadelphia, PA, USA, 12University of Alberta, Department of Physics, Edmonton, AB, Canada, 13University of Oxford, The Denys Wilkinson Building, Oxford, UK, 14The Enrico Fermi Institute and Department of Physics, The University of Chicago, Chicago, IL, USA, 15University of Pennsylvania, Department of Physics and Astronomy, Philadelphia, PA, USA, 16Laurentian University, Sudbury, ON, Canada, 17Laurentian University, Sudbury, ON, Canada, 18University of Pennsylvania, Department of Physics and Astronomy, Philadelphia, PA, USA, 19University of California, Department of Physics, Berkeley, CA, USA, 20Universidade de Coimbra, Laboratório de Instrumentaçao e Física Experimental de Partículas and Departamento de Física, Coimbra, Portugal, 21University of Oxford, The Denys Wilkinson Building, Oxford, UK, 22Laboratório de Instrumentaçao e Física Experimental de Partículas, 23Queen's University, Department of Physics, Engineering Physics and Astronomy, Kingston, ON, Canada, 24Laurentian University, Sudbury, ON, Canada, 25Queen's University, Department of Physics, Engineering Physics and Astronomy, Kingston, ON, Canada, 26Laurentian University, Sudbury, ON, Canada, 27University of Pennsylvania, Department of Physics and Astronomy, Philadelphia, PA, USA, 28Laurentian University, Sudbury, ON, Canada, 29Queen's University, Department of Physics, Engineering Physics and Astronomy, Kingston, ON, Canada, 30Laurentian University, Sudbury, ON, Canada, 31TRIUMF, Vancouver, BC, Canada, 32University of Pennsylvania, Department of Physics and Astronomy, Philadelphia, PA, USA, 33Laurentian University, Sudbury, ON, Canada, 34University of California, Department of Physics, Berkeley, CA, USA, 35Queen Mary, University of London, School of Physics and Astronomy, London, UK, 36Laurentian University, Sudbury, ON, Canada, 37Laurentian University, Sudbury, ON, Canada, 38University of Oxford, The Denys Wilkinson Building, Oxford, UK, 39University of Sussex, Physics and Astronomy, Falmer, Brighton, UK, 40Queen's University, Department of Physics, Engineering Physics and Astronomy, Kingston, ON, Canada, 41Laurentian University, Sudbury, ON, Canada, 42University of Alberta, Department of Physics, Edmonton, AB, Canada, 43University of California, Davis, CA, USA, 44University of Pennsylvania, Department of Physics and Astronomy, Philadelphia, PA, USA, 45Queen's University, Department of Physics, Engineering Physics and Astronomy, Kingston, ON, Canada, 46University of Alberta, Department of Physics, Edmonton, AB, Canada, 47Laurentian University, Sudbury, ON, Canada, 48Brookhaven National Laboratory, Chemistry Department, Upton, NY, USA, 49University of Sussex, Physics and Astronomy, Falmer, Brighton, UK, 50Queen's University, Department of Physics, Engineering Physics and Astronomy, Kingston, ON, Canada, 51University of Alberta, Department of Physics, Edmonton, AB, Canada, 52University of Pennsylvania, Department of Physics and Astronomy, Philadelphia, PA, USA, 53TRIUMF, Vancouver, BC, Canada, 54Laurentian University, Sudbury, ON, Canada, 55University of Alberta, Department of Physics, Edmonton, AB, Canada, 56Queen's University, Department of Physics, Engineering Physics and Astronomy, Kingston, ON, Canada, 57University of California, Department of Physics, Berkeley, CA, USA, 58University of Oxford, The Denys Wilkinson Building, Oxford, UK, 59Laurentian University, Sudbury, ON, Canada, 60University of Oxford, The Denys Wilkinson Building, Oxford, UK, 61Queen Mary, University of London, School of Physics and Astronomy, London, UK, 62University of California, Department of Physics, Berkeley, CA, USA, 63University of Pennsylvania, Department of Physics and Astronomy, Philadelphia, PA, USA, 64University of Washington, Center for Experimental Nuclear Physics and Astrophysics, and Department of Physics, Seattle, WA, USA, 65University of Pennsylvania, Department of Physics and Astronomy, Philadelphia, PA, USA, 66Laurentian University, Sudbury, ON, Canada, 67University of Washington, Center for Experimental Nuclear Physics and Astrophysics, and Department of Physics, Seattle, WA, USA, 68University of Pennsylvania, Department of Physics and Astronomy, Philadelphia, PA, USA, 69University of Pennsylvania, Department of Physics and Astronomy, Philadelphia, PA, USA, 70University of Washington, Center for Experimental Nuclear Physics and Astrophysics, and Department of Physics, Seattle, WA, USA, 71Lancaster University, Physics Department, Lancaster, UK, 72Laurentian University, Sudbury, ON, Canada, 73Laurentian University, Sudbury, ON, Canada, 74University of Alberta, Department of Physics, Edmonton, AB, Canada, 75The Enrico Fermi Institute and Department of Physics, The University of Chicago, Chicago, IL, USA, 76Queen's University, Department of Physics, Engineering Physics and Astronomy, Kingston, ON, Canada, 77Queen's University, Department of Physics, Engineering Physics and Astronomy, Kingston, ON, Canada, 78University of California, Department of Physics, Berkeley, CA, USA, 79Queen Mary, University of London, School of Physics and Astronomy, London, UK, 80The Enrico Fermi Institute and Department of Physics, The University of Chicago, Chicago, IL, USA, 81Laurentian University, Sudbury, ON, Canada, 82University of Sussex, Physics and Astronomy, Falmer, Brighton, UK, 83University of Sussex, Physics and Astronomy, Falmer, Brighton, UK, 84University of Oxford, The Denys Wilkinson Building, Oxford, UK, 85Queen's University, Department of Physics, Engineering Physics and Astronomy, Kingston, ON, Canada, 86Queen's University, Department of Physics, Engineering Physics and Astronomy, Kingston, ON, Canada, 87Technische Universität Dresden, Institut für Kern- und Teilchenphysik, Dresden, Germany, 88Brookhaven National Laboratory, Chemistry Department, Upton, NY, USA, 89Laboratório de Instrumentaçao e Física Experimental de Partículas, 90University of Oxford, The Denys Wilkinson Building, Oxford, UK, 91Queen's University, Department of Physics, Engineering Physics and Astronomy, Kingston, ON, Canada, 92Laboratório de Instrumentaçao e Física Experimental de Partículas, 93University of Pennsylvania, Department of Physics and Astronomy, Philadelphia, PA, USA, 94University of Pennsylvania, Department of Physics and Astronomy, Philadelphia, PA, USA, 95University of Liverpool, Department of Physics, Liverpool, UK, 96Queen's University, Department of Physics, Engineering Physics and Astronomy, Kingston, ON, Canada, 97University of Sheffield, Department of Physics and Astronomy, Sheffield, UK, 98University of Alberta, Department of Physics, Edmonton, AB, Canada, 99Queen's University, Department of Physics, Engineering Physics and Astronomy, Kingston, ON, Canada, 100University of Pennsylvania, Department of Physics and Astronomy, Philadelphia, PA, USA, 101Queen's University, Department of Physics, Engineering Physics and Astronomy, Kingston, ON, Canada, 102Queen Mary, University of London, School of Physics and Astronomy, London, UK, 103Queen's University, Department of Physics, Engineering Physics and Astronomy, Kingston, ON, Canada, 104Queen's University, Department of Physics, Engineering Physics and Astronomy, Kingston, ON, Canada, 105Queen's University, Department of Physics, Engineering Physics and Astronomy, Kingston, ON, Canada, 106University of Pennsylvania, Department of Physics and Astronomy, Philadelphia, PA, USA, 107Lancaster University, Physics Department, Lancaster, UK, 108University of Sussex, Physics and Astronomy, Falmer, Brighton, UK, 109University of California, Davis, CA, USA, 110University of Alberta, Department of Physics, Edmonton, AB, Canada, 111Laboratório de Instrumentaçao e Física Experimental de Partículas, 112University of California, Department of Physics, Berkeley, CA, USA, 113Queen's University, Department of Physics, Engineering Physics and Astronomy, Kingston, ON, Canada, 114University of Oxford, The Denys Wilkinson Building, Oxford, UK, 115University of Liverpool, Department of Physics, Liverpool, UK, 116University of Liverpool, Department of Physics, Liverpool, UK, 117Brookhaven National Laboratory, Chemistry Department, Upton, NY, USA, 118Laurentian University, Sudbury, ON, Canada, 119Laurentian University, Sudbury, ON, Canada, 120Laurentian University, Sudbury, ON, Canada, 121Laurentian University, Sudbury, ON, Canada, 122University of Washington, Center for Experimental Nuclear Physics and Astrophysics, and Department of Physics, Seattle, WA, USA, 123Armstrong Atlantic State University, Savannah, GA, USA, 124Queen's University, Department of Physics, Engineering Physics and Astronomy, Kingston, ON, Canada, 125University of Oxford, The Denys Wilkinson Building, Oxford, UK, 126University of Pennsylvania, Department of Physics and Astronomy, Philadelphia, PA, USA, 127Laurentian University, Sudbury, ON, Canada, 128University of Pennsylvania, Department of Physics and Astronomy, Philadelphia, PA, USA, 129University of Alberta, Department of Physics, Edmonton, AB, Canada, 130University of Sussex, Physics and Astronomy, Falmer, Brighton, UK, 131University of Alberta, Department of Physics, Edmonton, AB, Canada, 132Queen's University, Department of Physics, Engineering Physics and Astronomy, Kingston, ON, Canada, 133Technische Universität Dresden, Institut für Kern- und Teilchenphysik, Dresden, Germany, 134Queen's University, Department of Physics, Engineering Physics and Astronomy, Kingston, ON, Canada, 135University of Liverpool, Department of Physics, Liverpool, UK, 136The Enrico Fermi Institute and Department of Physics, The University of Chicago, Chicago, IL, USA, 137University of Sussex, Physics and Astronomy, Falmer, Brighton, UK, 138University of California, Davis, CA, USA, 139University of Washington, Center for Experimental Nuclear Physics and Astrophysics, and Department of Physics, Seattle, WA, USA, 140Queen's University, Department of Physics, Engineering Physics and Astronomy, Kingston, ON, Canada, 141University of Washington, Center for Experimental Nuclear Physics and Astrophysics, and Department of Physics, Seattle, WA, USA, 142University of Oxford, The Denys Wilkinson Building, Oxford, UK, 143University of Washington, Center for Experimental Nuclear Physics and Astrophysics, and Department of Physics, Seattle, WA, USA, 144University of Pennsylvania, Department of Physics and Astronomy, Philadelphia, PA, USA, 145SNOLAB, Sudbury, ON, Canada, 146Laurentian University, Sudbury, ON, Canada, 147Technische Universität Dresden, Institut für Kern- und Teilchenphysik, Dresden, Germany, 148University of Liverpool, Department of Physics, Liverpool, UK, 149Queen's University, Department of Physics, Engineering Physics and Astronomy, Kingston, ON, Canada, 150TRIUMF, Vancouver, BC, Canada, 151University of Sussex, Physics and Astronomy, Falmer, Brighton, UK, 152University of Sussex, Physics and Astronomy, Falmer, Brighton, UK, 153Queen Mary, University of London, School of Physics and Astronomy, London, UK, 154University of Washington, Center for Experimental Nuclear Physics and Astrophysics, and Department of Physics, Seattle, WA, USA, 155Queen's University, Department of Physics, Engineering Physics and Astronomy, Kingston, ON, Canada, 156Brookhaven National Laboratory, Chemistry Department, Upton, NY, USA, 157Queen's University, Department of Physics, Engineering Physics and Astronomy, Kingston, ON, Canada, 158Technische Universität Dresden, Institut für Kern- und Teilchenphysik, Dresden, Germany

SNO+ is a large liquid scintillator-based experiment located 2km underground at SNOLAB, Sudbury, Canada. It reuses the Sudbury Neutrino Observatory detector, consisting of a 12m diameter acrylic vessel which will be filled with about 780 tonnes of ultra-pure liquid scintillator. Designed as a multipurpose neutrino experiment, the primary goal of SNO+ is a search for the neutrinoless double-beta decay (0$\nu\beta\beta$) of 130Te. Read More

Following the early paper of Goldreich & Julian (1969), polar-cap models have usually assumed that the closed sector of a pulsar magnetosphere corotates with the neutron star. Recent work by Melrose & Yuen has been a reminder that in an oblique rotator, the induction field arising from the time-varying magnetic flux density cannot be completely screened. The principal consequence is that the plasma does not corotate with the star. Read More

We present a 30 - 50 GHz survey of Sagittarius B2(N) conducted with the Australia Telescope Compact Array (ATCA) with 5 - 10 arcsec resolution. This work releases the survey data and demonstrates the utility of scripts that perform automated spectral line fitting on broadband line data. We describe the line-fitting procedure, evaluate the performance of the method, and provide access to all data and scripts. Read More

Gamma-ray excitation functions have been measured for 30, 42, 54 and 66 MeV proton beams accelerated onto C + O (Mylar), Mg, Si, and Fe targets of astrophysical interest at the separate-sector cyclotron of iThemba LABS in Somerset West (Cape Town, South Africa). A large solid angle, high energy resolution detection system of the Eurogam type was used to record Gamma-ray energy spectra. Derived preliminary results of Gamma-ray line production cross sections for the Mg, Si and Fe target nuclei are reported and discussed. Read More

In this paper we compute the holographic entanglement entropy for massive flavors in the D3-D7 system, for arbitrary mass and various entangling region geometries. We show that the universal terms in the entanglement entropy exactly match those computed in the dual theory using conformal perturbation theory. We derive holographically the universal terms in the entanglement entropy for a CFT perturbed by a relevant operator, up to second order in the coupling; our results are valid for any entangling region geometry. Read More

We revise the Levy's construction of Brownian motion as a simple though still rigorous approach to operate with various Gaussian processes. A Brownian path is explicitly constructed as a linear combination of wavelet-based "geometrical features" at multiple length scales with random weights. Such a wavelet representation gives a closed formula mapping of the unit interval onto the functional space of Brownian paths. Read More

In this essay we examine the response of an Unruh-DeWitt detector (a quantum two-level system) to a gravitational wave background. The spectrum of the Unruh-Dewitt detector is of the same form as some scattering processes or three body decays such as muon-electron scattering or muon decay. Based on this similarity we propose that the Unruh-DeWitt detector response implies a "decay" or attenuation of gravitons, $G$, into photons, $\gamma$, via $G + G \rightarrow \gamma + \gamma $ or $G \rightarrow \gamma + \gamma + G$. Read More

Several classes of neutron star are sources of coherent emission at frequencies of 10^2 - 10^3 MHz: others are radio-quiet. The primary emission spectra are broadly universal in form over many orders of magnitude in rotation period and polar-cap magnetic flux density. The existence of nulls and mode-changes in some radio-loud pulsars can be understood only as a manifestation of magnetospherical bistability. Read More

Since the pioneering work of Arthur Ashkin, optical tweezers have become an indispensable tool for contactless manipulation of micro- and nanoparticles. Nowadays optical tweezers are employed in a myriad of applications demonstrating the importance of these tools. While the basic principle of optical tweezers is the use of a strongly focused laser beam to trap and manipulate particles, ever more complex experimental set-ups are required in order to perform novel and challenging experiments. Read More

We use the Mopra radio telescope to test for expansion of the molecular gas associated with the bubble HII region RCW120. A ring, or bubble, morphology is common for Galactic HII regions, but the three-dimensional geometry of such objects is still unclear. Detected near- and far-side expansion of the associated molecular material would be consistent with a three-dimensional spherical object. Read More

We present first results of neutral carbon ([CI], 3P1 - 3P0 at 492 GHz) and carbon monoxide (13CO, J = 1 - 0) mapping in the Vela Molecular Ridge cloud C (VMR-C) and G333 giant molecular cloud complexes with the NANTEN2 and Mopra telescopes. For the four regions mapped in this work, we find that [CI] has very similar spectral emission profiles to 13CO, with comparable line widths. We find that [CI] has opacity of 0. Read More

Rough surfaces immersed under water remain practically dry if the liquid-solid contact is on roughness peaks, while the roughness valleys are filled with gas. Mechanisms that prevent water from invading the valleys are well studied. However, to remain practically dry under water, additional mechanisms need consideration. Read More

Ions, protons and possibly a small flux of electrons and positrons are accelerated outward from the polar cap of a normal or millisecond pulsar whose rotational spin is antiparallel with its magnetic moment. The Langmuir modes of this relativistic plasma have several properties of significance for the origin of coherent radio emission. The characteristics of the mode are determined by the sequence of singularities in the dielectric tensor at real angular frequencies, which in turn is fixed by the electron-positron momentum distribution. Read More

N113 is an HII region located in the central part of the Large Magellanic Cloud (LMC) with an associated molecular cloud very rich in molecular species. Most of the previously observed molecular lines cover the frequency range 85-270 GHz. Thus, a survey and study of lines at the 345 GHz window is required in order to have a more complete understanding of the chemistry and excitation conditions of the region. Read More

Radio luminosities have been estimated from published data for a well-defined homogeneous set of 29 normal pulsars. The radio-frequency energies per unit charge in the primary accelerated particle beam are given for each pulsar and form a distribution more than two orders of magnitude in width. The values found show that pulsars are extremely efficient generators of radiation below 1 - 10 GHz given the kinematic constraints which are obtained here in the cases of electron-positron and ion-proton plasmas. Read More

The effective strength of EM interactions can be controlled by confining the fields to a cavity and these effects might be used to push graphene into a strongly coupled regime. We study the similar D3/probe D5 system on a compact space and discuss the gravity dual for a cavity between two mirrors. We show that the introduction of a conformal symmetry breaking length scale introduces a mass gap on a single D5 sheet. Read More

We call a restriction semigroup almost perfect if it is proper and its least monoid congruence is perfect. We show that any such semigroup is isomorphic to a `$W$-product' $W(T,Y)$, where $T$ is a monoid, $Y$ is a semilattice and there is a homomorphism from $T$ into the inverse semigroup $TI_Y$ of isomorphisms between ideals of $Y$. Conversely, all such $W$-products are almost perfect. Read More

2014Mar
Affiliations: 1University of New South Wales, 2University of New South Wales, 3Max-Planck-Institut fur Radioastronomie, 4Universidad Autonoma de Madrid, 5Canberra Deep Space Communication Complex, 6Universidad de Chile, 7Curtin University, 8University of Tasmania, 9University of New South Wales

Here we report observations of the two lowest inversion transitions of ammonia with the 70-m Tidbinbilla radio telescope. They were conducted to determine the kinetic temperatures in the dense clumps of the G333 giant molecular cloud associated with RCW 106 and to examine the effect that accurate temperatures have on the calculation of derived quantities such as mass. This project is part of a larger investigation to understand the timescales and evolutionary sequence associated with high-mass star formation, particularly its earliest stages. Read More

We present maps of a large number of dense molecular gas tracers across the Central Molecular Zone of our Galaxy. The data were taken with the CSIRO/CASS Mopra telescope in Large Projects in the 1.3cm, 7mm, and 3mm wavelength regimes. Read More

SPLASH (the Southern Parkes Large-Area Survey in Hydroxyl) is a sensitive, unbiased and fully-sampled survey of the Southern Galactic Plane and Galactic Centre in all four ground-state transitions of the hydroxyl (OH) radical. The survey provides a deep census of 1612-, 1665-, 1667- and 1720-MHz OH absorption and emission from the Galactic ISM, and is also an unbiased search for maser sources in these transitions. We present here first results from the SPLASH pilot region, which covers Galactic longitudes 334 to 344 degrees and latitudes of -2 to +2 degrees. Read More

Analysis of plasma acceleration in pulsars with positive corotational charge density has shown that any element of area on the polar cap is bi-stable: it can be in phases either of pure proton emission or of mixed ions and protons (the ion phase). Ion-phase zones are concentrated near the edge of the polar cap, and are a physical basis for the coherent radio emission observed as components within the mean pulse profile. The state of the polar cap is generally chaotic, but organized linear motion of ion zones in a peripheral band is possible and is the likely source of sub-pulse drift. Read More

The Millimetre Astronomy Legacy Team 90 GHz (MALT90) survey aims to characterise the physical and chemical evolution of high-mass star-forming clumps. Exploiting the unique broad frequency range and on-the-fly mapping capabilities of the Australia Telescope National Facility Mopra 22 m single-dish telescope, MALT90 has obtained 3' x 3' maps toward ~2000 dense molecular clumps identified in the ATLASGAL 870 um Galactic plane survey. The clumps were selected to host the early stages of high-mass star formation and to span the complete range in their evolutionary states (from prestellar, to protostellar, and on to HII regions and photodissociation regions). Read More

This proceedings is based on a talk given at the APS DPF 2013 on an alternative 5-dimensional brane world model which is related to but has some physically distinct features from the Randall-Sundrum brane world model. The spin dependent localization of 5D fields for the alternative model are different and in some ways superior to the original Randall- Sundrum Model. The alternative model also exhibits a cutoff in the lo-calization of massive scalar fields not seen in the Randall-Sundrum and includes a self consistent mass prediction of two possible scalar bosons. Read More