M. Xiao - Univ. of Texas at Austin

M. Xiao
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Name
M. Xiao
Affiliation
Univ. of Texas at Austin
City
Austin
Country
United States

Pubs By Year

Pub Categories

 
Physics - Optics (14)
 
Physics - Mesoscopic Systems and Quantum Hall Effect (10)
 
Quantum Physics (7)
 
Mathematics - Information Theory (7)
 
Computer Science - Information Theory (7)
 
Mathematics - Complex Variables (6)
 
High Energy Physics - Experiment (3)
 
High Energy Physics - Phenomenology (3)
 
Computer Science - Data Structures and Algorithms (3)
 
Computer Science - Performance (2)
 
Computer Science - Networking and Internet Architecture (2)
 
Physics - Instrumentation and Detectors (2)
 
Astrophysics of Galaxies (1)
 
Instrumentation and Methods for Astrophysics (1)
 
Physics - Accelerator Physics (1)
 
Cosmology and Nongalactic Astrophysics (1)

Publications Authored By M. Xiao

Many physical systems, such as water/electricity distribution networks, are monitored by battery-powered Wireless Sensor Networks (WSNs). Since battery replacement of sensor nodes is generally difficult, long-term monitoring can be only achieved if the operation of the WSN nodes contributes to a long WSN lifetime. Two prominent techniques to long WSN lifetime are i) optimal sensor activation and ii) efficient data gathering and forwarding based on compressive sensing. Read More

We present a study on how to realize the widely interested optomechanical entanglement at high temperature. Unlike the majority of the previous experimental and theoretical researches that consider the entanglement of a mechanical resonator with a cavity field created by red-detuned continuous-wave or blue-detuned pulsed driving field, we find that applying blue-detuned continuous-wave pump field to cavity optomechanical systems can achieve considerable degrees of quantum entanglement, which is generally challenging to obtain at high temperature for the known physical systems. The competition between the induced squeezing-type interaction and the existing decoherence leads to stable entanglement in dynamically unstable regime. Read More

We address edge states and rich localization regimes available in the one-dimensional (1D) dynamically modulated superlattices, both theoretically and numerically. In contrast to conventional lattices with straight waveguides, the quasi-energy band of infinite modulated superlattice is periodic not only in the transverse Bloch momentum, but it also changes periodically with increase of the coupling strength between waveguides. Due to collapse of quasi-energy bands dynamical superlattices admit known dynamical localization effect. Read More

We introduce the Hermitian-invariant group $\Gamma_f$ of a proper rational map $f$ between the unit ball in complex Euclidean space and a generalized ball in a space of typically higher dimension. We use properties of the groups to define the crucial new concepts of essential map and the source rank of a map. We prove that every finite subgroup of the source automorphism group is the Hermitian-invariant group of some rational proper map between balls. Read More

Graphene-based electromechanical resonators have attracted much interest recently because of the outstanding mechanical and electrical properties of graphene and their various applications. However, the coupling between mechanical motion and charge transport has not been explored in graphene. Here, we studied the mechanical properties of a suspended 50-nm-wide graphene nanoribbon, which also acts as a single-electron transistor (SET) at low temperature. Read More

Broadcasting/multicasting is an efficient mechanism for multimedia communications due to its high spectrum efficiency, which achieves point-to-multipoint transmission on the same radio resources. To satisfy the increasing demands for multimedia broadcast multicast service (MBMS), we present a power domain non-orthogonal MBMS transmission scheme in a K-tier heterogeneous network (HetNet). Firstly, the system model, usage scenarios, and fundamentals of the presented scheme are discussed. Read More

The geometric phase and topological property for one-dimensional hybrid plasmonic-photonic crystals consisting of a simple lattice of graphene sheets are investigated systematically. For transverse magnetic waves, both plasmonic and photonic modes exist in the momentum space. The accidental degeneracy point of these two kinds of modes is identified to be a diabolic point accompanied with a topological phase transition. Read More

2017Feb
Affiliations: 1Fermilab, 2Fermilab, 3Fermilab, 4Fermilab, 5Fermilab, 6Fermilab

The transfer line for beam extraction from the Recycler ring to P1 line provides a way to deliver 8 GeV kinetic energy protons from the Booster to the Delivery ring, via the Recycler, using existing beam transport lines, and without the need for new civil construction. It was designed in 2012. The kicker magnets at RR520 and the lambertson magnet at RR522 in the RR were installed in 2014 Summer Shutdown, the elements of RR to P1 Stub (permanent quads, trim quads, correctors, BPMs, the toroid at 703 and vertical bending dipole at V703 (ADCW) were installed in 2015 Summer Shutdown. Read More

We discuss an in-situ evaluation of the $^{85}$Kr, $^{222}$Rn, and $^{220}$Rn background in PandaX-I, a 120-kg liquid xenon dark matter direct detection experiment. Combining with a simulation, their contributions to the low energy electron-recoil background in the dark matter search region are obtained. Read More

Phonon-cavity electromechanics allows the manipulation of mechanical oscillations similar to photon-cavity systems. Many advances on this subject have been achieved in various materials. In addition, the coherent phonon transfer (phonon Rabi oscillations) between the phonon cavity mode and another oscillation mode has attracted many interest in nano-science. Read More

Recently, transition metal dichalcogenides (TMDCs) semiconductors have been utilized for investigating quantum phenomena because of their unique band structures and novel electronic properties. In a quantum dot (QD), electrons are confined in all lateral dimensions, offering the possibility for detailed investigation and controlled manipulation of individual quantum systems. Beyond the definition of graphene QDs by opening an energy gap in nanoconstrictions, with the presence of a bandgap, gate-defined QDs can be achieved on TMDCs semiconductors. Read More

Carbon nanotubes (CNTs) have attracted much attention for use in nanomechanical devices because of their exceptional properties, such as large resonant frequencies, low mass, and high quality factors. Here, we report the first experimental realization of parametric strong coupling between two mechanical modes on a single CNT nanomechanical resonator, by applying an extra microwave pump. This parametric pump method can be used to couple mechanical modes with arbitrary frequency differences. Read More

Although both epitaxial quantum dots (QDs) and colloidal nanocrystals (NCs) are quantum-confined semiconductor nanostructures, so far they have demonstrated dramatically-different exciton fine structure splittings (FSSs) at the cryogenic temperature. The single-QD photoluminescence (PL) is dominated by the bright-exciton FSS, while it is the energy separation between bright and dark excitons that is often referred to as the FSS in a single NC. Here we show that, in single perovskite CsPbI3 NCs synthesized from a colloidal approach, a bright-exciton FSS as large as hundreds of {\mu}eV can be resolved with two orthogonally- and linearly-polarized PL peaks. Read More

We study a proposal of generating macroscopic continuous-variable entanglement with two coupled waveguides respectively carrying optical damping and optical gain. Moreover, a squeezing element is added into one or both waveguides. We show that quantum noise effect existing in the process is essential to the degree of the generated entanglement. Read More

In this paper, we study the problem of finding an integral multiflow which maximizes the sum of flow values between every two terminals in an undirected tree with a nonnegative integer edge capacity and a set of terminals. In general, it is known that the flow value of an integral multiflow is bounded by the cut value of a cut-system which consists of disjoint subsets each of which contains exactly one terminal or has an odd cut value, and there exists a pair of an integral multiflow and a cut-system whose flow value and cut value are equal; i.e. Read More

High speed wireless access on 60 GHz spectrum relies on high-gain directional antennas to overcome the severe signal attenuation. However, perfect alignment between transmitting and receiving antenna beams is rare in practice and overheard signals from concurrent transmissions may cause significant interference. In this paper we analyze the impact of antenna beam misalignment on the system performance of 60 GHz wireless access. Read More

New constraints are presented on the spin-dependent WIMP-nucleon interaction from the PandaX-II experiment, using a data set corresponding to a total exposure of 3.3$\times10^4$ kg-days. Assuming a standard axial-vector spin-dependent WIMP interaction with $^{129}$Xe and $^{131}$Xe nuclei, the most stringent upper limits on WIMP-neutron cross sections for WIMPs with masses above 10 GeV/c$^{2}$ are set in all dark matter direct detection experiments. Read More

Narrow-band intensity-difference squeezing (IDS) beams have important applications in quantum metrology and quantum information. The best way to generate narrow-band IDS is to employ parametrically-amplified (PA) four-wave mixing (FWM) process in high-gain atomic media. Such IDS can be further enhanced by cascading multiple PA-FWM processes in separate atomic media. Read More

We present a study of nuclear activities in nearby S0 galaxies. After cross-matching the Sloan Digital Sky Survey Data Release 7 (SDSS DR7) with the Third Reference Catalog of Bright Galaxies (RC3) and visually checking the SDSS images, we derive a sample of 583 S0 galaxies with the central spectrophotometric information. In order to separate nebular emission lines from the underlying stellar contribution, we fit the stellar population model to the SDSS spectra of these S0 galaxies. Read More

2016Oct
Authors: D. de Florian1, C. Grojean2, F. Maltoni3, C. Mariotti4, A. Nikitenko5, M. Pieri6, P. Savard7, M. Schumacher8, R. Tanaka9, R. Aggleton10, M. Ahmad11, B. Allanach12, C. Anastasiou13, W. Astill14, S. Badger15, M. Badziak16, J. Baglio17, E. Bagnaschi18, A. Ballestrero19, A. Banfi20, D. Barducci21, M. Beckingham22, C. Becot23, G. Bélanger24, J. Bellm25, N. Belyaev26, F. U. Bernlochner27, C. Beskidt28, A. Biekötter29, F. Bishara30, W. Bizon31, N. E. Bomark32, M. Bonvini33, S. Borowka34, V. Bortolotto35, S. Boselli36, F. J. Botella37, R. Boughezal38, G. C. Branco39, J. Brehmer40, L. Brenner41, S. Bressler42, I. Brivio43, A. Broggio44, H. Brun45, G. Buchalla46, C. D. Burgard47, A. Calandri48, L. Caminada49, R. Caminal Armadans50, F. Campanario51, J. Campbell52, F. Caola53, C. M. Carloni Calame54, S. Carrazza55, A. Carvalho56, M. Casolino57, O. Cata58, A. Celis59, F. Cerutti60, N. Chanon61, M. Chen62, X. Chen63, B. Chokoufé Nejad64, N. Christensen65, M. Ciuchini66, R. Contino67, T. Corbett68, D. Curtin69, M. Dall'Osso70, A. David71, S. Dawson72, J. de Blas73, W. de Boer74, P. de Castro Manzano75, C. Degrande76, R. L. Delgado77, F. Demartin78, A. Denner79, B. Di Micco80, R. Di Nardo81, S. Dittmaier82, A. Dobado83, T. Dorigo84, F. A. Dreyer85, M. Dührssen86, C. Duhr87, F. Dulat88, K. Ecker89, K. Ellis90, U. Ellwanger91, C. Englert92, D. Espriu93, A. Falkowski94, L. Fayard95, R. Feger96, G. Ferrera97, A. Ferroglia98, N. Fidanza99, T. Figy100, M. Flechl101, D. Fontes102, S. Forte103, P. Francavilla104, E. Franco105, R. Frederix106, A. Freitas107, F. F. Freitas108, F. Frensch109, S. Frixione110, B. Fuks111, E. Furlan112, S. Gadatsch113, J. Gao114, Y. Gao115, M. V. Garzelli116, T. Gehrmann117, R. Gerosa118, M. Ghezzi119, D. Ghosh120, S. Gieseke121, D. Gillberg122, G. F. Giudice123, E. W. N. Glover124, F. Goertz125, D. Gonçalves126, J. Gonzalez-Fraile127, M. Gorbahn128, S. Gori129, C. A. Gottardo130, M. Gouzevitch131, P. Govoni132, D. Gray133, M. Grazzini134, N. Greiner135, A. Greljo136, J. Grigo137, A. V. Gritsan138, R. Gröber139, S. Guindon140, H. E. Haber141, C. Han142, T. Han143, R. Harlander144, M. A. Harrendorf145, H. B. Hartanto146, C. Hays147, S. Heinemeyer148, G. Heinrich149, M. Herrero150, F. Herzog151, B. Hespel152, V. Hirschi153, S. Hoeche154, S. Honeywell155, S. J. Huber156, C. Hugonie157, J. Huston158, A. Ilnicka159, G. Isidori160, B. Jäger161, M. Jaquier162, S. P. Jones163, A. Juste164, S. Kallweit165, A. Kaluza166, A. Kardos167, A. Karlberg168, Z. Kassabov169, N. Kauer170, D. I. Kazakov171, M. Kerner172, W. Kilian173, F. Kling174, K. Köneke175, R. Kogler176, R. Konoplich177, S. Kortner178, S. Kraml179, C. Krause180, F. Krauss181, M. Krawczyk182, A. Kulesza183, S. Kuttimalai184, R. Lane185, A. Lazopoulos186, G. Lee187, P. Lenzi188, I. M. Lewis189, Y. Li190, S. Liebler191, J. Lindert192, X. Liu193, Z. Liu194, F. J. Llanes-Estrada195, H. E. Logan196, D. Lopez-Val197, I. Low198, G. Luisoni199, P. Maierhöfer200, E. Maina201, B. Mansoulié202, H. Mantler203, M. Mantoani204, A. C. Marini205, V. I. Martinez Outschoorn206, S. Marzani207, D. Marzocca208, A. Massironi209, K. Mawatari210, J. Mazzitelli211, A. McCarn212, B. Mellado213, K. Melnikov214, S. B. Menari215, L. Merlo216, C. Meyer217, P. Milenovic218, K. Mimasu219, S. Mishima220, B. Mistlberger221, S. -O. Moch222, A. Mohammadi223, P. F. Monni224, G. Montagna225, M. Moreno Llácer226, N. Moretti227, S. Moretti228, L. Motyka229, A. Mück230, M. Mühlleitner231, S. Munir232, P. Musella233, P. Nadolsky234, D. Napoletano235, M. Nebot236, C. Neu237, M. Neubert238, R. Nevzorov239, O. Nicrosini240, J. Nielsen241, K. Nikolopoulos242, J. M. No243, C. O'Brien244, T. Ohl245, C. Oleari246, T. Orimoto247, D. Pagani248, C. E. Pandini249, A. Papaefstathiou250, A. S. Papanastasiou251, G. Passarino252, B. D. Pecjak253, M. Pelliccioni254, G. Perez255, L. Perrozzi256, F. Petriello257, G. Petrucciani258, E. Pianori259, F. Piccinini260, M. Pierini261, A. Pilkington262, S. Plätzer263, T. Plehn264, R. Podskubka265, C. T. Potter266, S. Pozzorini267, K. Prokofiev268, A. Pukhov269, I. Puljak270, M. Queitsch-Maitland271, J. Quevillon272, D. Rathlev273, M. Rauch274, E. Re275, M. N. Rebelo276, D. Rebuzzi277, L. Reina278, C. Reuschle279, J. Reuter280, M. Riembau281, F. Riva282, A. Rizzi283, T. Robens284, R. Röntsch285, J. Rojo286, J. C. Romão287, N. Rompotis288, J. Roskes289, R. Roth290, G. P. Salam291, R. Salerno292, R. Santos293, V. Sanz294, J. J. Sanz-Cillero295, H. Sargsyan296, U. Sarica297, P. Schichtel298, J. Schlenk299, T. Schmidt300, C. Schmitt301, M. Schönherr302, U. Schubert303, M. Schulze304, S. Sekula305, M. Sekulla306, E. Shabalina307, H. S. Shao308, J. Shelton309, C. H. Shepherd-Themistocleous310, S. Y. Shim311, F. Siegert312, A. Signer313, J. P. Silva314, L. Silvestrini315, M. Sjodahl316, P. Slavich317, M. Slawinska318, L. Soffi319, M. Spannowsky320, C. Speckner321, D. M. Sperka322, M. Spira323, O. Stål324, F. Staub325, T. Stebel326, T. Stefaniak327, M. Steinhauser328, I. W. Stewart329, M. J. Strassler330, J. Streicher331, D. M. Strom332, S. Su333, X. Sun334, F. J. Tackmann335, K. Tackmann336, A. M. Teixeira337, R. Teixeira de Lima338, V. Theeuwes339, R. Thorne340, D. Tommasini341, P. Torrielli342, M. Tosi343, F. Tramontano344, Z. Trócsányi345, M. Trott346, I. Tsinikos347, M. Ubiali348, P. Vanlaer349, W. Verkerke350, A. Vicini351, L. Viliani352, E. Vryonidou353, D. Wackeroth354, C. E. M. Wagner355, J. Wang356, S. Wayand357, G. Weiglein358, C. Weiss359, M. Wiesemann360, C. Williams361, J. Winter362, D. Winterbottom363, R. Wolf364, M. Xiao365, L. L. Yang366, R. Yohay367, S. P. Y. Yuen368, G. Zanderighi369, M. Zaro370, D. Zeppenfeld371, R. Ziegler372, T. Zirke373, J. Zupan374
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This Report summarizes the results of the activities of the LHC Higgs Cross Section Working Group in the period 2014-2016. The main goal of the working group was to present the state-of-the-art of Higgs physics at the LHC, integrating all new results that have appeared in the last few years. The first part compiles the most up-to-date predictions of Higgs boson production cross sections and decay branching ratios, parton distribution functions, and off-shell Higgs boson production and interference effects. Read More

The Coulomb interactions between electrons play important roles in coupling multiple qubits in various quantum systems. Here we demonstrate controlled quantum operations of three electron charge qubits based on three capacitively coupled semiconductor double quantum dots. The strong interactions between one double dot and other two double dots enable us to control the coherent rotations of one target qubit by the states of two control qubits. Read More

In this paper, the sphere bound (SB) is revisited within a general bounding framework based on nested Gallager regions. The equivalence is revealed between the SB proposed by Herzberg and Poltyrev and the SB proposed by Kasami et al., whereas the latter was rarely cited in the literatures. Read More

In this paper, we analyze a chain-linked triple-cavity photonic molecule (TCPM) with controllable coupling strengths between the cavities on their spectral properties and field (energy) distributions by solving eigenvalues and eigenvectors of the Hamiltonian matrix based on coupled mode theory. Phase transition is extended from double-cavity photonic molecules (DCPMs) to TCPMs, and evolutions of the supermode frequencies and linewidths are analyzed, which have synchronous relations with the degree of coherence between adjacent optical microcavities and energy distributions in the three cavities, respectively. We develop a superposition picture for the three supermodes of the TCPM, as interferences between supermodes of sub-DCPMs. Read More

Asymmetry in a three-electron double quantum dot (DQD) allows spin blockade, when spin-3/2 (quadruplet) states and spin-1/2 (doublet) states have different charge configurations. We have observed this DQD spin blockade near the (1,2)-(2,1) charge transition using a pulsed-gate technique and a charge sensor. We then use this spin blockade to detect Landau-Zener-St\"uckelberg (LZS) interference and coherent oscillations between the spin quadruplet and doublet states. Read More

Weyl fermions1 do not appear in nature as elementary particles, but they are now found to exist as nodal points in the band structure of electronic and classical wave crystals. Novel phenomena such as Fermi arcs and chiral anomaly have fueled the interest of these topological points which are frequently perceived as monopoles in momentum space. Here, we demonstrate that generalized Weyl points can exist in a parameter space and we report the first observation of such nodal points in one-dimensional photonic crystals in the optical range. Read More

In this paper, we investigate the band properties of 2D honeycomb plasmonic lattices consisting of metallic nanoparticles. By means of the coupled dipole method and quasi-static approximation, we theoretically analyze the band structures stemming from near-field interaction of localized surface plasmon polaritons for both the infinite lattice and ribbons. Naturally, the interaction of point dipoles decouples into independent out-of-plane and in-plane polarizations. Read More

Optical orbital angular momentum (OAM) provides an additional dimension for photons to carry information in high-capacity optical communication. Although the practical needs have intrigued the generations of miniaturized devices to manipulate the OAM modes in various integrated platforms, the on-chip OAM detection is still challenging to match the newly-developed compact OAM emitter and OAM transmission fiber. Here, we demonstrate an ultra-compact device, i. Read More

We establish a link between the fractional Schr\"odinger equation (FSE) and light propagation in the honeycomb lattice (HCL) - the Dirac-Weyl equation (DWE). The fractional Laplacian in FSE causes a modulation of the dispersion relation of the system, which in the limiting case becomes linear. In the HCL, the dispersion relation is already linear around the Dirac point, suggesting a possible connection with the FSE. Read More

Interface states in photonic crystals usually require defects or surface/interface decorations. We show here that one can control interface states in 1D photonic crystals through the engineering of geometrical phase such that interface states can be guaranteed in even or odd, or in all photonic bandgaps. We verify experimentally the designed interface states in 1D multilayered photonic crystals fabricated by electron beam vapor deposition. Read More

The optimum off-line energy management scheme for multi-user multi-relay networks employing energy harvesting and wireless energy transfer is studied. Specifically, the users are capable of harvesting and transferring energy to each other over consecutive transmissions, though they have no fixed energy supplies. Meanwhile, network coding for the users' messages is conducted at the relays to enable cooperative transmission with source nodes in independent but not necessarily identically distributed (i. Read More

We study the complexity of holomorphic isometries and proper maps from the complex unit ball to type IV classical domains. We investigate on degree estimates of holomorphic isometries and holomorphic maps with minimum target dimension. We also construct a real-parameter family of mutually inequivalent holomorphic isometries from the unit ball to type IV domains. Read More

The understanding of dynamical evolutions of interacting photon pulses in Rydberg atomic ensemble is the prerequisite for realizing quantum devices with such system. We present an approach that efficiently simulates the dynamical processes, using a set of local functions we construct to reflect the profiles of narrowband pulses. For two counter-propagating photon pulses, our approach predicts the distinct phenomena from the widely concerned Rydberg blockade to the previously less noticed significant absorption in the anomalous dispersion regime, which can occur by respectively setting the pulse frequency to the appropriate values. Read More

We provide regularity results for CR-maps between real hypersurfaces in complex spaces of different dimension with a Levi-degenerate target. We address both the real-analytic and the smooth case. Our results allow immediate applications to the study of proper holomorphic maps between Bounded Symmetric Domains. Read More

Effective transition between the population-inverted optical eigenmodes of two coupled microcavities carrying mechanical oscillation realizes a phonon analogue of optical two-level laser. By providing an approach that linearizes the dynamical equations of weak nonlinear systems without relying on their steady states, we study such phonon laser action as a realistic dynamical process, which exhibits time-dependent stimulated phonon field amplification especially when one of the cavities is added with optical gain medium. The approach we present explicitly gives the conditions for the optimum phonon lasing, and thermal noise is found to be capable of facilitating the phonon laser action significantly. Read More

A 3-path vertex cover in a graph is a vertex subset $C$ such that every path of three vertices contains at least one vertex from $C$. The parameterized 3-path vertex cover problem asks whether a graph has a 3-path vertex cover of size at most $k$. In this paper, we give a kernel of $5k$ vertices and an $O^*(1. Read More

We report on transport properties of the super-honeycomb lattice, the band structure of which possesses a flat band and Dirac cones, according to the tight-binding approximation. This super-honeycomb model combines the honeycomb lattice and the Lieb lattice and displays the properties of both. The super-honeycomb lattice also represents a hybrid fermionic and bosonic system, which is rarely seen in nature. Read More

The energy efficiency (EE) of a multi-user multi-relay system with the maximum diversity network coding (MDNC) is studied. We explicitly find the connection among the outage probability, energy consumption and EE and formulate the maximizing EE problem under the outage probability constraints. Relay scheduling (RS) and power allocation (PA) are applied to schedule the relay states (transmitting, sleeping, \emph{etc}) and optimize the transmitting power under the practical channel and power consumption models. Read More

Graph separation and partitioning are fundamental problems that have been extensively studied both in theory and practice. The \textsc{$p$-Size Separator} problem, closely related to the \textsc{Balanced Separator} problem, is to check whether we can delete at most $k$ vertices in a given graph $G$ such that each connected component of the remaining graph has at most $p$ vertices. This problem is NP-hard for each fixed integer $p\geq 1$ and it becomes the famous \textsc{Vertex Cover} problem when $p=1$. Read More

We study proper rational maps from the unit disk to balls in higher dimensions. After gathering some known results, we study the moduli space of unitary equivalence classes of polynomial proper maps from the disk to a ball, and we establish a normal form for these equivalence classes. We also prove that all rational proper maps from the disk to a ball are homotopic in target dimension at least $2$. Read More

The abundance of unlicensed spectrum in the 60 GHz band makes it an attractive alternative for future wireless communication systems. Such systems are expected to provide data transmission rates in the order of multi-gigabits per second in order to satisfy the ever-increasing demand for high rate data communication. Unfortunately, 60 GHz radio is subject to severe path loss which limits its usability for long-range outdoor communication. Read More

We experimentally demonstrate the Talbot effect resulting from the repeated self-reconstruction of a spatially intensity-modulated probe field under the Fresnel near-field regime. By launching the probe beam into an optically induced atomic lattice (established by interfering two coupling fields) inside a rubidium vapor cell, we can obtain an diffracted probe beam pattern from an formed electromagnetically induced grating (EIG) in a three-level $\Lambda$-type Doppler-free atomic configuration with the assistance of electromagnetically induced transparency (EIT). The EIG-based diffraction pattern repeats itself at the planes of integer multiple Talbot lengths, which agrees well with the theoretical prediction [Appl. Read More

To meet the ever-increasing demands on higher throughput and better network delay performance, 60 GHZ networking is proposed as a promising solution for the next generation of wireless communications. To successfully deploy such networks, its important to understand their performance first. However, due to the unique fading characteristic of the 60 GHz channel, the characterization of the corresponding service process, offered by the channel, using the conventional methodologies may not be tractable. Read More

We show that Weyl points with topological charges 1 and 2 can be found in very simple chiral woodpile photonic crystals, which can be fabricated using current techniques down to the nano-scale. The sign of the topological charges can be tuned by changing the material parameters of the crystal, keeping the structure and the symmetry unchanged. The underlying physics can be understood using a tight binding model, which shows that the sign of the charge depends on the hopping range. Read More

The decentralized caching is studied in two-layer networks, where users request contents through intermediate nodes (helpers) from a file server. By placing contents randomly and independently in each node and carefully designing the data delivery, the correlations of the pre-stored contents across layers can be utilized to reduce the transmission rates in the network. A hybrid caching scheme is developed by exploiting the cross-layer storage correlations, the single-layer multicast opportunities from the server (each helper) to helpers (the attached users), and the cross-layer multicast opportunities from the server to users. Read More

The first part of the article surveys some work on the Chern-Moser-Weyl tensor and its application in the embeddability problem into hyperquadrics. In the last section, we give a negative answer to a folklore conjecture concerning the embeddability of compact, strongly pseudoconvex, real algebraic hypersurfaces into a sphere of sufficiently high dimension. Read More

We prove rigidity results for holomorphic proper maps from the complex unit ball $\mathbb{B}^n$ to the Type IV bounded symmetric domain $D^{IV}_m$ where $n \geq 4, n+1\leq m \leq 2n-3$. In addition, a classification result is established when $m=n+1.$ Read More

Despite fundamentally challenging in integrated (nano)photonics, achieving chip-based light nonreciprocity becomes increasingly urgent in signal processing and optical communications. Because of material incompatibilities in conventional approaches based on Faraday effects, alternative solutions have resorted to nonlinear processes to obtain one-way transmission. However, revealed dynamic reciprocity in a recent theoretical analysis has pinned down the functionalities of these nonlinear isolators. Read More

In this paper we investigate anomalous interactions of the Higgs boson with heavy fermions, employing shapes of kinematic distributions. We study the processes $pp \to t\bar{t} + H$, $b\bar{b} + H$, $tq+H$, and $pp \to H\to\tau^+\tau^-$, and present applications of event generation, re-weighting techniques for fast simulation of anomalous couplings, as well as matrix element techniques for optimal sensitivity. We extend the MELA technique, which proved to be a powerful matrix element tool for Higgs boson discovery and characterization during Run I of the LHC, and implement all analysis tools in the JHU generator framework. Read More

We report two new classes of face-centered photonic square lattices with flat bands which we call the Lieb-I and the Lieb-II lattices. There are 5 and 7 sites in the corresponding unit cells of the simplest Lieb-I and Lieb-II lattices, respectively. The number of flat bands $m$ in the new Lieb lattices is related to the number of sites $N$ in the unit cell by $m=(N-1)/2$. Read More