M. Spannowsky - M. Vos ed.

M. Spannowsky
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M. Spannowsky
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M. Vos ed.
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High Energy Physics - Phenomenology (50)
 
High Energy Physics - Experiment (31)
 
High Energy Physics - Theory (3)
 
Cosmology and Nongalactic Astrophysics (2)
 
General Relativity and Quantum Cosmology (1)
 
High Energy Astrophysical Phenomena (1)

Publications Authored By M. Spannowsky

We calculate the two-loop contributions from a modified trilinear Higgs self-interaction, $\kappa_\lambda \lambda_{\rm SM} v h^3$, to the electroweak oblique parameters $S$ and $T$. Using the current bounds on $S$ and $T$ from electroweak measurements, we find the 95% C.L. Read More

${\rm W}^\pm {\rm W}^\pm {\rm H}$ production at hadron colliders through vector boson scattering is a so far unconsidered process, which leads to a clean signature of two same-sign charged leptons and two widely separated jets. This process is sensitive to the ${\rm HHH}$ and ${\rm WWHH}$ couplings and any deviation of these couplings from their SM predictions serves as direct evidence of new physics beyond the SM. In this paper we perform a Monte Carlo study of this process for the $\sqrt{s}=14$ TeV LHC and a $100$ TeV pp-collider, and provide projections of the constraints on the triple-Higgs and ${\rm WWHH}$ quartic couplings for these environments. Read More

We analyze the prospects for resonant di-Higgs production searches at the LHC in the $b\bar{b} W^+ W^-$ ($W^{+} \to \ell^{+} \nu_{\ell}$, $W^{-} \to \ell^{-} \bar{\nu}_{\ell}$) channel, as a probe of the nature of the electroweak phase transition in Higgs portal extensions of the Standard Model. In order to maximize the sensitivity in this final state, we develop a new algorithm for the reconstruction of the $b \bar{b} W^+ W^-$ invariant mass in the presence of neutrinos from the $W$ decays, building from a technique developed for the reconstruction of resonances decaying to $\tau^{+}\tau^{-}$ pairs. We show that resonant di-Higgs production in the $b\bar{b} W^+ W^-$ channel could be a competitive probe of the electroweak phase transition already with the datasets to be collected by the CMS and ATLAS experiments in Run-2 of the LHC. Read More

The discovery of lepton flavour violating interactions will be striking evidence for physics beyond the Standard Model. Focusing on the three decays $\tau^\mp \to \mu^\pm \mu^\mp \mu^\mp$, $\tau^\mp \to e^\pm \mu^\mp \mu^\mp$ and $\tau^\mp \to e^\mp \mu^\mp \mu^\pm$, we evaluate the discovery potential of current and future high-energy colliders to probe lepton flavour violation in the $\tau$ sector. Based on this potential we determine the expected constraints on parameters of new physics in the context of the Type-II Seesaw Model, the Left-Right Symmetric Model, and the Minimal Supersymmetric Standard Model. Read More

A precise measurement of the Higgs $h \to Z \gamma$ decay is very challenging at the LHC, due to the very low %SM $h \to Z \gamma\, (Z \to \ell \ell)$ branching fraction and the shortage of kinematic handles to suppress the large SM $Z \gamma$ background. We show how such a measurement would be significantly improved by considering Higgs production in association with a hard jet. We compare the prospective HL-LHC sensitivity in this channel with other Higgs production modes where $h$ is fairly boosted, e. Read More

We investigate multilepton signatures, arising from the decays of doubly charged and singly charged Higgs bosons in the Type-II Seesaw model. Depending on the vacuum expectation value of the triplet $v_{\Delta}$, the doubly and singly charged Higgs bosons can decay into a large variety of multi-lepton final states. We explore all possible decay modes corresponding to different regimes of $v_{\Delta}$, that generate distinguishing four and five leptonic signatures. Read More

Perturbative probability conservation provides a strong constraint on the presence of new interactions of the Higgs boson. In this work we consider CP violating Higgs interactions in conjunction with unitarity constraints in the gauge-Higgs and fermion-Higgs sectors. Injecting signal strength measurements of the recently discovered Higgs boson allows us to make concrete and correlated predictions of how CP-violation in the Higgs sector can be directly constrained through collider searches for either characteristic new states or tell-tale enhancements in multi-Higgs processes. Read More

After the discovery of the Higgs boson and the rather precise measurement of all electroweak boson's masses the local structure of the electroweak symmetry breaking potential is already quite well established. However, despite being a key ingredient to a fundamental understanding of the underlying mechanism of electroweak symmetry breaking, the global structure of the electroweak potential remains entirely unknown. The existence of sphalerons, unstable solutions of the classical action of motion that are interpolating between topologically distinct vacua, is a direct consequence of the Standard Model's $\mathrm{SU}(2)_L$ gauge group. Read More

2016Oct
Authors: D. de Florian1, C. Grojean2, F. Maltoni3, C. Mariotti4, A. Nikitenko5, M. Pieri6, P. Savard7, M. Schumacher8, R. Tanaka9, R. Aggleton10, M. Ahmad11, B. Allanach12, C. Anastasiou13, W. Astill14, S. Badger15, M. Badziak16, J. Baglio17, E. Bagnaschi18, A. Ballestrero19, A. Banfi20, D. Barducci21, M. Beckingham22, C. Becot23, G. Bélanger24, J. Bellm25, N. Belyaev26, F. U. Bernlochner27, C. Beskidt28, A. Biekötter29, F. Bishara30, W. Bizon31, N. E. Bomark32, M. Bonvini33, S. Borowka34, V. Bortolotto35, S. Boselli36, F. J. Botella37, R. Boughezal38, G. C. Branco39, J. Brehmer40, L. Brenner41, S. Bressler42, I. Brivio43, A. Broggio44, H. Brun45, G. Buchalla46, C. D. Burgard47, A. Calandri48, L. Caminada49, R. Caminal Armadans50, F. Campanario51, J. Campbell52, F. Caola53, C. M. Carloni Calame54, S. Carrazza55, A. Carvalho56, M. Casolino57, O. Cata58, A. Celis59, F. Cerutti60, N. Chanon61, M. Chen62, X. Chen63, B. Chokoufé Nejad64, N. Christensen65, M. Ciuchini66, R. Contino67, T. Corbett68, D. Curtin69, M. Dall'Osso70, A. David71, S. Dawson72, J. de Blas73, W. de Boer74, P. de Castro Manzano75, C. Degrande76, R. L. Delgado77, F. Demartin78, A. Denner79, B. Di Micco80, R. Di Nardo81, S. Dittmaier82, A. Dobado83, T. Dorigo84, F. A. Dreyer85, M. Dührssen86, C. Duhr87, F. Dulat88, K. Ecker89, K. Ellis90, U. Ellwanger91, C. Englert92, D. Espriu93, A. Falkowski94, L. Fayard95, R. Feger96, G. Ferrera97, A. Ferroglia98, N. Fidanza99, T. Figy100, M. Flechl101, D. Fontes102, S. Forte103, P. Francavilla104, E. Franco105, R. Frederix106, A. Freitas107, F. F. Freitas108, F. Frensch109, S. Frixione110, B. Fuks111, E. Furlan112, S. Gadatsch113, J. Gao114, Y. Gao115, M. V. Garzelli116, T. Gehrmann117, R. Gerosa118, M. Ghezzi119, D. Ghosh120, S. Gieseke121, D. Gillberg122, G. F. Giudice123, E. W. N. Glover124, F. Goertz125, D. Gonçalves126, J. Gonzalez-Fraile127, M. Gorbahn128, S. Gori129, C. A. Gottardo130, M. Gouzevitch131, P. Govoni132, D. Gray133, M. Grazzini134, N. Greiner135, A. Greljo136, J. Grigo137, A. V. Gritsan138, R. Gröber139, S. Guindon140, H. E. Haber141, C. Han142, T. Han143, R. Harlander144, M. A. Harrendorf145, H. B. Hartanto146, C. Hays147, S. Heinemeyer148, G. Heinrich149, M. Herrero150, F. Herzog151, B. Hespel152, V. Hirschi153, S. Hoeche154, S. Honeywell155, S. J. Huber156, C. Hugonie157, J. Huston158, A. Ilnicka159, G. Isidori160, B. Jäger161, M. Jaquier162, S. P. Jones163, A. Juste164, S. Kallweit165, A. Kaluza166, A. Kardos167, A. Karlberg168, Z. Kassabov169, N. Kauer170, D. I. Kazakov171, M. Kerner172, W. Kilian173, F. Kling174, K. Köneke175, R. Kogler176, R. Konoplich177, S. Kortner178, S. Kraml179, C. Krause180, F. Krauss181, M. Krawczyk182, A. Kulesza183, S. Kuttimalai184, R. Lane185, A. Lazopoulos186, G. Lee187, P. Lenzi188, I. M. Lewis189, Y. Li190, S. Liebler191, J. Lindert192, X. Liu193, Z. Liu194, F. J. Llanes-Estrada195, H. E. Logan196, D. Lopez-Val197, I. Low198, G. Luisoni199, P. Maierhöfer200, E. Maina201, B. Mansoulié202, H. Mantler203, M. Mantoani204, A. C. Marini205, V. I. Martinez Outschoorn206, S. Marzani207, D. Marzocca208, A. Massironi209, K. Mawatari210, J. Mazzitelli211, A. McCarn212, B. Mellado213, K. Melnikov214, S. B. Menari215, L. Merlo216, C. Meyer217, P. Milenovic218, K. Mimasu219, S. Mishima220, B. Mistlberger221, S. -O. Moch222, A. Mohammadi223, P. F. Monni224, G. Montagna225, M. Moreno Llácer226, N. Moretti227, S. Moretti228, L. Motyka229, A. Mück230, M. Mühlleitner231, S. Munir232, P. Musella233, P. Nadolsky234, D. Napoletano235, M. Nebot236, C. Neu237, M. Neubert238, R. Nevzorov239, O. Nicrosini240, J. Nielsen241, K. Nikolopoulos242, J. M. No243, C. O'Brien244, T. Ohl245, C. Oleari246, T. Orimoto247, D. Pagani248, C. E. Pandini249, A. Papaefstathiou250, A. S. Papanastasiou251, G. Passarino252, B. D. Pecjak253, M. Pelliccioni254, G. Perez255, L. Perrozzi256, F. Petriello257, G. Petrucciani258, E. Pianori259, F. Piccinini260, M. Pierini261, A. Pilkington262, S. Plätzer263, T. Plehn264, R. Podskubka265, C. T. Potter266, S. Pozzorini267, K. Prokofiev268, A. Pukhov269, I. Puljak270, M. Queitsch-Maitland271, J. Quevillon272, D. Rathlev273, M. Rauch274, E. Re275, M. N. Rebelo276, D. Rebuzzi277, L. Reina278, C. Reuschle279, J. Reuter280, M. Riembau281, F. Riva282, A. Rizzi283, T. Robens284, R. Röntsch285, J. Rojo286, J. C. Romão287, N. Rompotis288, J. Roskes289, R. Roth290, G. P. Salam291, R. Salerno292, R. Santos293, V. Sanz294, J. J. Sanz-Cillero295, H. Sargsyan296, U. Sarica297, P. Schichtel298, J. Schlenk299, T. Schmidt300, C. Schmitt301, M. Schönherr302, U. Schubert303, M. Schulze304, S. Sekula305, M. Sekulla306, E. Shabalina307, H. S. Shao308, J. Shelton309, C. H. Shepherd-Themistocleous310, S. Y. Shim311, F. Siegert312, A. Signer313, J. P. Silva314, L. Silvestrini315, M. Sjodahl316, P. Slavich317, M. Slawinska318, L. Soffi319, M. Spannowsky320, C. Speckner321, D. M. Sperka322, M. Spira323, O. Stål324, F. Staub325, T. Stebel326, T. Stefaniak327, M. Steinhauser328, I. W. Stewart329, M. J. Strassler330, J. Streicher331, D. M. Strom332, S. Su333, X. Sun334, F. J. Tackmann335, K. Tackmann336, A. M. Teixeira337, R. Teixeira de Lima338, V. Theeuwes339, R. Thorne340, D. Tommasini341, P. Torrielli342, M. Tosi343, F. Tramontano344, Z. Trócsányi345, M. Trott346, I. Tsinikos347, M. Ubiali348, P. Vanlaer349, W. Verkerke350, A. Vicini351, L. Viliani352, E. Vryonidou353, D. Wackeroth354, C. E. M. Wagner355, J. Wang356, S. Wayand357, G. Weiglein358, C. Weiss359, M. Wiesemann360, C. Williams361, J. Winter362, D. Winterbottom363, R. Wolf364, M. Xiao365, L. L. Yang366, R. Yohay367, S. P. Y. Yuen368, G. Zanderighi369, M. Zaro370, D. Zeppenfeld371, R. Ziegler372, T. Zirke373, J. Zupan374
Affiliations: 1eds., 2eds., 3eds., 4eds., 5eds., 6eds., 7eds., 8eds., 9eds., 10The LHC Higgs Cross Section Working Group, 11The LHC Higgs Cross Section Working Group, 12The LHC Higgs Cross Section Working Group, 13The LHC Higgs Cross Section Working Group, 14The LHC Higgs Cross Section Working Group, 15The LHC Higgs Cross Section Working Group, 16The LHC Higgs Cross Section Working Group, 17The LHC Higgs Cross Section Working Group, 18The LHC Higgs Cross Section Working Group, 19The LHC Higgs Cross Section Working Group, 20The LHC Higgs Cross Section Working Group, 21The LHC Higgs Cross Section Working Group, 22The LHC Higgs Cross Section Working Group, 23The LHC Higgs Cross Section Working Group, 24The LHC Higgs Cross Section Working Group, 25The LHC Higgs Cross Section Working Group, 26The LHC Higgs Cross Section Working Group, 27The LHC Higgs Cross Section Working Group, 28The LHC Higgs Cross Section Working Group, 29The LHC Higgs Cross Section Working Group, 30The LHC Higgs Cross 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This Report summarizes the results of the activities of the LHC Higgs Cross Section Working Group in the period 2014-2016. The main goal of the working group was to present the state-of-the-art of Higgs physics at the LHC, integrating all new results that have appeared in the last few years. The first part compiles the most up-to-date predictions of Higgs boson production cross sections and decay branching ratios, parton distribution functions, and off-shell Higgs boson production and interference effects. Read More

Non-minimal composite Higgs scenarios can contain exotic Higgs states which, if getting observed at the Large Hadron Collider, will help to constrain the underlying UV structure of the strong dynamics. Doubly charged Higgs bosons are well-motivated scalar degrees of freedom in this context. Their phenomenology in typical composite scenarios can differ from well-established Higgs triplet extensions of the SM. Read More

Observation of Higgs pair production is an important long term objective of the LHC physics program as it will shed light on the scalar potential of the Higgs field and the nature of electroweak symmetry breaking. While numerous studies have examined the impact of new physics on di-Higgs production, little attention has been given to the well-motivated possibility of exotic Higgs decays in this channel. Here we investigate the consequences of exotic invisible Higgs decays in di-Higgs production. Read More

The separation of quark and gluon initiated jets can be an important way to improve the sensitivity in searches for new physics or in measurements of Higgs boson properties. We present a simplified version of the shower deconstruction approach as a novel observable for quark-gluon tagging. Assuming topocluster-like objects as input, we compare our observable with energy correlation functions and find a favorable performance for a large variety of jet definitions. Read More

We re-examine the discovery potential at hadron colliders of high-mass right-handed (RH) gauge bosons $W_R$ - an inherent ingredient of Left-Right Symmetric Models (LRSM). We focus on the regime where the $W_R$ is very heavy compared to the heavy Majorana neutrino $N$, and investigate an alternative signature for $W_R \rightarrow N$ decays. The produced neutrinos are highly boosted in this mass regime. Read More

We evaluate the LHC's potential of observing Higgs boson decays into light elementary or composite resonances through their hadronic decay channels. We focus on the Higgs boson production processes with the largest cross sections, $pp\to h$ and $pp\to h+\mathrm{jet}$, with subsequent decays $h \to ZA$ or $h\to Z\,\eta_c$, and comment on the production process $pp\to hZ$. By exploiting track-based jet substructure observables and extrapolating to $3000~\mathrm{fb}^{-1}$ we find ${\cal BR}(h \to ZA) \simeq {\cal BR}(h \to Z \eta_c) \lesssim 0. Read More

Dark sectors with strong interactions have received considerable interest. Assuming the existence of a minimally coupled dark sector which runs to strong interactions in the infrared, we address the question whether the scaling behavior of this dark sector can be observed in missing energy signatures at present and future hadron colliders. We compare these findings to the concrete case of self-interacting dark matter and demonstrate that the energy dependence of high-momentum transfer final states can in principle be used to gain information about the UV structure of hidden sectors at future hadron colliders, subject to large improvements in systematic uncertainties, which could complement proof-of-principle lattice investigations. Read More

We explore the method of using the measured jet activity associated with a high mass resonance state to determine the corresponding production modes. To demonstrate the potential of the approach, we consider the case of a resonance of mass $M_R$ decaying to a diphoton final state. We perform a Monte Carlo study, considering three mass points $M_R=0. Read More

2016Jun

This report summarises the physics opportunities in the search and study of physics beyond the Standard Model at a 100 TeV pp collider. Read More

Simplified models provide an avenue for characterising and exploring New Physics for large classes of UV theories. In this article we study the ability of the LHC to probe the spin and parity quantum numbers of a new light resonance $X$ which couples predominantly to the third generation quarks in a variety of simplified models through the $t\bar t X$ channel. After evaluating the LHC discovery potential for $X$, we suggest several kinematic variables sensitive to the spin and CP properties of the new resonance. Read More

We explore the ability of the high luminosity LHC to test models which can explain the 750 GeV diphoton excess. We focus on a wide class of models where a 750 GeV singlet scalar couples to Standard Model gauge bosons and quarks, as well as dark matter. Including both gluon and photon fusion production mechanisms, we show that LHC searches in channels correlated with the diphoton signal will be able to probe wide classes of diphoton models with $\mathcal{L} \sim 3000\, \text{fb}^{-1}$ of data. Read More

The ultraviolet structure of $s$-channel mediator dark matter simplified models at hadron colliders is considered. In terms of commonly studied $s$-channel mediator simplified models it is argued that at arbitrarily high energies the perturbative description of dark matter production in high energy scattering at hadron colliders will break down in a number of cases. This is analogous to the well documented breakdown of an EFT description of dark matter collider production. Read More

Higgs portal interactions provide a simple mechanism for addressing two open problems in cosmology: dark matter and the baryon asymmetry. In the latter instance, Higgs portal interactions may contain the ingredients for a strong first order electroweak phase transition as well as new CP-violating interactions as needed for electroweak baryogenesis. These interactions may also allow for a viable dark matter candidate. Read More

Scalar dark energy fields that couple to the Standard Model can give rise to observable signatures at the LHC. In this work we show that $t\bar t+$missing energy and mono-jet searches are suitable probes in the limit where the dark energy scalar is stable on collider distances. We discuss the prospects of distinguishing the dark energy character of new physics signals from dark matter signatures and the possibility of probing the self-interactions of the dark energy sector. Read More

We discuss the observability of neutrino-induced sphaleron transitions in the IceCube detector, encouraged by a recent paper by Tye and Wong (TW), which argued on the basis of a Bloch wave function in the periodic sphaleron potential that such transitions should be enhanced compared to most previous calculations. We calculate the dependence on neutrino energy of the sphaleron transition rate, comparing it to that for conventional neutrino interactions, and we discuss the observability of tau and multi-muon production in sphaleron-induced transitions. We use IceCube 4-year data to constrain the sphaleron rate, finding that it is comparable to the upper limit inferred previously from a recast of an ATLAS search for microscopic black holes at the LHC with $\sim 3$/fb of collisions at 13 TeV. Read More

Run-I results from the CMS collaboration show an excess of events in the decay $h \to \mu \tau_e$ with a local significances of 2.4$\sigma$. This could be the first hint of flavour violation in the Higgs sector. Read More

We re-investigate electroweak signal-background interference in associated Higgs production via gluon fusion in the presence of new physics in the top-Higgs sector. Considering the full final state $pp \to b \bar b \ell^+\ell^-$ ($\ell=e,\mu$), we discuss how new physics in the top-Higgs sector that enhances the $ZZ$ component can leave footprints in the $HZ$ limit setting. In passing we investigate the phenomenology of a class of new physics interactions that can be genuinely studied in this process. Read More

In this paper we propose a scale invariant search strategy for hadronic top or bottom plus missing energy final states. We present a method which shows flat efficiencies and background rejection factors over broad ranges of parameters and masses. The resulting search can be easily recast into a limit on alternative models. Read More

Motivated by aLIGO's recent discovery of gravitational waves we discuss signatures of new physics that could be seen at ground and space-based interferometers. We show that a first order phase transition in a dark sector would lead to a detectable gravitational wave signal at future experiments, if the phase transition has occurred at temperatures few orders of magnitude higher than the electroweak scale. The source of gravitational waves in this case is associated with the dynamics of expanding and colliding bubbles in the early universe. Read More

The discovery of the Higgs boson marks a key ingredient to establish the electroweak structure of the Standard Model. Its non-abelian gauge structure gives rise to, yet unobserved, non-perturbative baryon and lepton number violating processes. We propose to use cosmic ray air showers, as measured at the Pierre Auger Observatory, to set a limit on the hadronic production cross section of sphalerons. Read More

We study Higgs production through weak boson fusion with subsequent decay to bottom quarks. By combining jet substructure techniques and matrix element methods in different limits we motivate this channel as a probe of the bottom-Yukawa interactions in the boosted regime. In particular we ameliorate the "no-go" results of cut-and-count analyses in this channel. Read More

Due to the absence of tantalising hints for new physics during the LHC's run 1, the extension of the Higgs sector by dimension six operators will provide the new phenomenological standard for searches of non-resonant extensions of the Standard Model. Using all dominant and subdominant Higgs production mechanisms at the LHC, we compute the constraints on Higgs physics-relevant dimension six operators in a global and correlated fit. We show in how far these constraints can be improved by new Higgs channels becoming accessible at higher energy and luminosity, both through inclusive cross sections as well as through highly sensitive differential distributions. Read More

A precise measurement of the Higgs boson couplings to bottom and top quarks is of paramount importance during the upcoming LHC runs. We present a comprehensive analysis for the Higgs production process in association with a semi-leptonically decaying top-quark pair and subsequent Higgs boson decay into bottom quarks. Due to the highly complex final state and large Standard Model backgrounds, measuring the signal strength in this process is known to be challenging. Read More

We investigate the reach of the LHC Run 2 and that of a future circular hadron collider with up to 100 TeV centre of mass energy for the exploration of potential Dark Matter sectors. These dark sectors are conveniently and broadly described by simplified models. The simplified models we consider provide microscopic descriptions of interactions between the Standard Model partons and the dark sector particles mediated by the four basic types of messenger fields: scalar, pseudo-scalar, vector or axial-vector. Read More

Axion-like particles (ALPs), relatively light (pseudo-)scalars coupled to two gauge bosons, are a common feature of many extensions of the Standard Model. Up to now there has been a gap in the sensitivity to such particles in the MeV to 10 GeV range. In this note we show that LEP data on $Z\to\gamma\gamma$ decays provides significant constraints in this range (and indeed up to the $Z$-mass). Read More

The ATLAS collaboration recently reported an excess of events in the high invariant mass tail of reconstructed di-boson events. We investigate their analysis and point to possible subtleties and improvements in the jet substructure implementation and data-driven background estimates. Read More

CP-odd scalars are an integral part of many extensions of the Standard Model. Recently, electroweak-scale pseudoscalars have received increased attention in explaining the diffuse gamma-ray excess from the Galactic Centre. Elusive due to absence of direct couplings to gauge bosons, these particles receive only weak constraints from direct searches at LEP or searches performed during the first LHC runs. Read More

The search for di-Higgs production at the LHC in order to set limits on Higgs trilinear coupling and constraints on new physics is one of the main motivations for the LHC high luminosity phase. Recent experimental analyses suggest that such analyses will only be successful if information from a range of channels is included. We therefore investigate di-Higgs production in association with two hadronic jets and give a detailed discussion of both the gluon- and weak boson fusion contributions, with a particular emphasis on the phenomenology with modified Higgs trilinear and quartic gauge couplings. Read More

We study the discovery prospects of a heavy neutral scalar arising from a $U(1)_{B-L}$ extension of the Standard Model (SM) during the Large Hadron Collider's high luminosity runs (HL-LHC). This heavy neutral scalar mixes with the SM Higgs boson through a Higgs portal and interacts with the SM particles with an interaction strength proportional to the sine of the mixing angle. The mixing between the two Higgs bosons is constrained by direct and indirect measurements. Read More

We investigate simplified models of dark matter with scalar mediators at hadron colliders using the final state topology with 2 jets and missing energy. These models can arise in a wide variety of BSM scenarios including the possibility of the mediator mixing with the Higgs. Our aim is first to determine the projected reach of the LHC and the future circular hadron collider for excluding such models. Read More

Heavy resonances are an integral part of many extensions of the Standard Model. The discovery of such heavy resonances are a primary goal at the LHC and future hadron colliders. When a particle with TeV-scale mass decays into electroweak-scale objects, these objects are highly boosted and their decay products are then strongly collimated, possibly to an extent that they cannot be resolved in the calorimeters of the detectors any more. Read More

2015Apr

This paper describes the physics case for a new fixed target facility at CERN SPS. The SHiP (Search for Hidden Particles) experiment is intended to hunt for new physics in the largely unexplored domain of very weakly interacting particles with masses below the Fermi scale, inaccessible to the LHC experiments, and to study tau neutrino physics. The same proton beam setup can be used later to look for decays of tau-leptons with lepton flavour number non-conservation, $\tau\to 3\mu$ and to search for weakly-interacting sub-GeV dark matter candidates. Read More

The correlation of on- and off-shell Higgs boson production at the LHC in $gg \to h^* \to ZZ$ to bound the Higgs width, under specific model-dependent assumptions, has recently received a lot of attention. As off-shell cross section measurements in this channel suffer from a small signal yield, large backgrounds, and theoretical uncertainties, we propose an alternative complementary constraint which is only possible through the combination of LEP and LHC measurements. Previous precision electroweak measurements at LEP allow for the determination of indirect constraints on Higgs couplings to vector bosons by considering one-loop processes involving virtual Higgs exchange. Read More

Supersymmetric extensions of the Standard Model with highly mixed squark flavours beyond minimal flavour violation provide interesting scenarios of new physics, which have so far received limited attention. We propose a calculable realization of such scenarios in models of gauge mediation augmented with an extra interaction between the messengers and the up type squark. We compute the supersymmetric spectrum and analyze the flavour physics constraints on such models. Read More

Over the past decade, a large number of jet substructure observables have been proposed in the literature, and explored at the LHC experiments. Such observables attempt to utilize the internal structure of jets in order to distinguish those initiated by quarks, gluons, or by boosted heavy objects, such as top quarks and W bosons. This report, originating from and motivated by the BOOST2013 workshop, presents original particle-level studies that aim to improve our understanding of the relationships between jet substructure observables, their complementarity, and their dependence on the underlying jet properties, particularly the jet radius and jet transverse momentum. Read More

If the recently discovered Higgs boson's couplings deviate from the Standard Model expectation, we may anticipate new resonant physics in the weak boson fusion channels resulting from high scale unitarity sum rules of longitudinal gauge boson scattering. Motivated by excesses in analyses of multi-leptons+missing energy+jets final states during run 1, we perform a phenomenological investigation of these channels at the LHC bounded by current Higgs coupling constraints. Such an approach constrains the prospects to observe such new physics at the LHC as a function of very few and generic parameters and allows the investigation of the strong requirement of probability conservation in the electroweak sector to high energies. Read More

Top quark loops in Higgs production via gluon fusion at large invariant final state masses can induce important interference effects in searches for additional Higgs bosons as predicted in, e.g., Higgs portal scenarios and the MSSM when the heavy scalar is broad or the final state resolution is poor. Read More

An important physics goal of a possible next-generation high-energy hadron collider will be precision characterisation of the Higgs sector and electroweak symmetry breaking. A crucial part of understanding the nature of electroweak symmetry breaking is measuring the Higgs self-interactions. We study dihiggs production in proton-proton collisions at 100 TeV centre of mass energy in order to estimate the sensitivity such a machine would have to variations in the trilinear Higgs coupling around the Standard Model expectation. Read More

We outline and investigate a set of benchmark simplified models with the aim of providing a minimal simple framework for an interpretation of the existing and forthcoming searches of dark matter particles at the LHC. The simplified models we consider provide microscopic QFT descriptions of interactions between the Standard Model partons and the dark sector particles mediated by the four basic types of messenger fields: scalar, pseudo-scalar, vector or axial-vector. Our benchmark models are characterised by four to five parameters, including the mediator mass and width, the dark matter mass and an effective coupling(s). Read More

Proposals of measuring the off-shell Higgs contributions and first measurements at the LHC have electrified the Higgs phenomenology community for two reasons: Firstly, probing interactions at high invariant masses and momentum transfers is intrinsically sensitive to new physics beyond the Standard Model, irrespective of a resonant or non-resonant character of a particular BSM scenario. Secondly, under specific assumptions a class of models exists for which the off-shell coupling measurement together with a measurement of the on-shell signal strength can be re-interpreted in terms of a bound on the total Higgs boson width. In this paper, we provide a first step towards a classification of the models for which a total width measurement is viable and we discuss examples of BSM models for which the off-shell coupling measurement can be important in either constraining or even discovering new physics in the upcoming LHC runs. Read More

Searches for multi-Higgs final states allow to constrain parameters of the SM (or extensions thereof) that directly relate to the mechanism of electroweak symmetry breaking. Multi-Higgs production cross sections, however, are small and the phenomenologically accessible final states are challenging to isolate in the busy multi-jet hadron collider environment of the LHC run 2. This makes the necessity to extend the list of potentially observable production mechanisms obvious. Read More