M. N. Rashad

M. N. Rashad
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M. N. Rashad
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Computer Science - Artificial Intelligence (7)
 
Mathematics - Group Theory (5)
 
Computer Science - Neural and Evolutionary Computing (3)
 
High Energy Physics - Experiment (3)
 
Nuclear Experiment (3)
 
Computer Science - Networking and Internet Architecture (2)
 
Computer Science - Information Retrieval (2)
 
Computer Science - Robotics (2)
 
Computer Science - Distributed; Parallel; and Cluster Computing (2)
 
Computer Science - Computation and Language (1)
 
Computer Science - Computer Vision and Pattern Recognition (1)
 
Computer Science - Human-Computer Interaction (1)
 
Computer Science - Cryptography and Security (1)
 
Computer Science - Information Theory (1)
 
High Energy Physics - Phenomenology (1)
 
Computer Science - Mathematical Software (1)
 
Computer Science - Programming Languages (1)
 
Quantum Physics (1)
 
Mathematics - Information Theory (1)

Publications Authored By M. N. Rashad

The proton is composed of quarks and gluons, bound by the most elusive mechanism of strong interaction called confinement. In this work, the dynamics of quarks and gluons are investigated using deeply virtual Compton scattering (DVCS): produced by a multi-GeV electron, a highly virtual photon scatters off the proton which subsequently radiates a high energy photon. Similarly to holography, measuring not only the magnitude but also the phase of the DVCS amplitude allows to perform 3D images of the internal structure of the proton. Read More

2017Feb
Affiliations: 1The Jefferson Lab Hall A Collaboration, 2The Jefferson Lab Hall A Collaboration, 3The Jefferson Lab Hall A Collaboration, 4The Jefferson Lab Hall A Collaboration, 5The Jefferson Lab Hall A Collaboration, 6The Jefferson Lab Hall A Collaboration, 7The Jefferson Lab Hall A Collaboration, 8The Jefferson Lab Hall A Collaboration, 9The Jefferson Lab Hall A Collaboration, 10The Jefferson Lab Hall A Collaboration, 11The Jefferson Lab Hall A Collaboration, 12The Jefferson Lab Hall A Collaboration, 13The Jefferson Lab Hall A Collaboration, 14The Jefferson Lab Hall A Collaboration, 15The Jefferson Lab Hall A Collaboration, 16The Jefferson Lab Hall A Collaboration, 17The Jefferson Lab Hall A Collaboration, 18The Jefferson Lab Hall A Collaboration, 19The Jefferson Lab Hall A Collaboration, 20The Jefferson Lab Hall A Collaboration, 21The Jefferson Lab Hall A Collaboration, 22The Jefferson Lab Hall A Collaboration, 23The Jefferson Lab Hall A Collaboration, 24The Jefferson Lab Hall A Collaboration, 25The Jefferson Lab Hall A Collaboration, 26The Jefferson Lab Hall A Collaboration, 27The Jefferson Lab Hall A Collaboration, 28The Jefferson Lab Hall A Collaboration, 29The Jefferson Lab Hall A Collaboration, 30The Jefferson Lab Hall A Collaboration, 31The Jefferson Lab Hall A Collaboration, 32The Jefferson Lab Hall A Collaboration, 33The Jefferson Lab Hall A Collaboration, 34The Jefferson Lab Hall A Collaboration, 35The Jefferson Lab Hall A Collaboration, 36The Jefferson Lab Hall A Collaboration, 37The Jefferson Lab Hall A Collaboration, 38The Jefferson Lab Hall A Collaboration, 39The Jefferson Lab Hall A Collaboration, 40The Jefferson Lab Hall A Collaboration, 41The Jefferson Lab Hall A Collaboration, 42The Jefferson Lab Hall A Collaboration, 43The Jefferson Lab Hall A Collaboration, 44The Jefferson Lab Hall A Collaboration, 45The Jefferson Lab Hall A Collaboration, 46The Jefferson Lab Hall A Collaboration, 47The Jefferson Lab Hall A Collaboration, 48The Jefferson Lab Hall A Collaboration, 49The Jefferson Lab Hall A Collaboration, 50The Jefferson Lab Hall A Collaboration, 51The Jefferson Lab Hall A Collaboration, 52The Jefferson Lab Hall A Collaboration, 53The Jefferson Lab Hall A Collaboration, 54The Jefferson Lab Hall A Collaboration, 55The Jefferson Lab Hall A Collaboration, 56The Jefferson Lab Hall A Collaboration, 57The Jefferson Lab Hall A Collaboration, 58The Jefferson Lab Hall A Collaboration, 59The Jefferson Lab Hall A Collaboration, 60The Jefferson Lab Hall A Collaboration, 61The Jefferson Lab Hall A Collaboration, 62The Jefferson Lab Hall A Collaboration, 63The Jefferson Lab Hall A Collaboration, 64The Jefferson Lab Hall A Collaboration, 65The Jefferson Lab Hall A Collaboration, 66The Jefferson Lab Hall A Collaboration, 67The Jefferson Lab Hall A Collaboration, 68The Jefferson Lab Hall A Collaboration, 69The Jefferson Lab Hall A Collaboration, 70The Jefferson Lab Hall A Collaboration, 71The Jefferson Lab Hall A Collaboration, 72The Jefferson Lab Hall A Collaboration, 73The Jefferson Lab Hall A Collaboration, 74The Jefferson Lab Hall A Collaboration, 75The Jefferson Lab Hall A Collaboration, 76The Jefferson Lab Hall A Collaboration, 77The Jefferson Lab Hall A Collaboration, 78The Jefferson Lab Hall A Collaboration, 79The Jefferson Lab Hall A Collaboration, 80The Jefferson Lab Hall A Collaboration, 81The Jefferson Lab Hall A Collaboration, 82The Jefferson Lab Hall A Collaboration, 83The Jefferson Lab Hall A Collaboration, 84The Jefferson Lab Hall A Collaboration, 85The Jefferson Lab Hall A Collaboration, 86The Jefferson Lab Hall A Collaboration, 87The Jefferson Lab Hall A Collaboration, 88The Jefferson Lab Hall A Collaboration, 89The Jefferson Lab Hall A Collaboration, 90The Jefferson Lab Hall A Collaboration, 91The Jefferson Lab Hall A Collaboration, 92The Jefferson Lab Hall A Collaboration, 93The Jefferson Lab Hall A Collaboration, 94The Jefferson Lab Hall A Collaboration, 95The Jefferson Lab Hall A Collaboration, 96The Jefferson Lab Hall A Collaboration, 97The Jefferson Lab Hall A Collaboration, 98The Jefferson Lab Hall A Collaboration

We report the first longitudinal/transverse separation of the deeply virtual exclusive $\pi^0$ electroproduction cross section off the neutron and coherent deuteron. The corresponding four structure functions $d\sigma_L/dt$, $d\sigma_T/dt$, $d\sigma_{LT}/dt$ and $d\sigma_{TT}/dt$ are extracted as a function of the momentum transfer to the recoil system at $Q^2$=1.75 GeV$^2$ and $x_B$=0. Read More

We present deeply virtual $\pi^0$ electroproduction cross-section measurements at $x_B$=0.36 and three different $Q^2$--values ranging from 1.5 to 2 GeV$^2$, obtained from experiment E07-007 that ran in the Hall A at Jefferson Lab. Read More

A groupoid satisfying the left invertive law: $ab\cdot c=cb\cdot a$ is called an AG-groupoid and is a generalization of commutative semigroups. We consider the concept of bi-commutativity in AG-groupoids and thus introduce left commutative AG-groupoids, right commutative AG-groupoids and bi-commutative AG-groupoids. We provide a method to test an arbitrary Cayley's table for these AG-groupoids and explore some of the general properties of these AG-groupoids. Read More

A groupoid that satisfying the left invertive law is called an AG-groupoid.this concept is extended to introduce a Stein AG-groupoid. We provethe existence by providing some non-associative examples. Read More

A groupoid that satisfies the left invertive law: $ab\cdot c=cb\cdot a$ is called an AG-groupoid. We extend the concept of left abelian distributive groupoid (LAD) and right abelian distributive groupoid (RAD) to introduce new subclasses of AG-groupoid, left abelian distributive AG-groupoid and right abelian distributive AG-groupoid. We give their enumeration up to order 6 and find some basic relations of these new classes with other known subclasses of AG-groupoids and other relevant algebraic structures. Read More

A groupoid G is called an AG-groupoid if it satisfies the left invertive law: (ab)c = (cb)a. An AG-group G, is an AG-groupoid with left identity e \in G (that is, ea = a for all a \in G) and for all a \in G there exists a' \in G such that a.a' = a'. Read More

An AG-groupoid is an algebraic structure that satisfies the left invertive law: (ab)c =(cb)a. We prove that the class of left transitive AG-groupoids (AG-groupoids satisfying the identity, ab.ac = bc) coincides with the class of T2-AG-groupoids. Read More

Recommender systems are needed to find food items of ones interest. We review recommender systems and recommendation methods. We propose a food personalization framework based on adaptive hypermedia. Read More

One of the hot problems in grid computing is job scheduling. It is known that the job scheduling is NP-complete, and thus the use of heuristics is the de facto approach to deal with this practice in its difficulty. The proposed is an imagination to fish swarm, job dispatcher and Visualization gridsim to execute some jobs. Read More

Huffman Compression, also known as Huffman Coding, is one of many compression techniques in use today. The two important features of Huffman coding are instantaneousness that is the codes can be interpreted as soon as they are received and variable length that is a most frequent symbol has length smaller than a less frequent symbol. The traditional Huffman coding has two procedures: constructing a tree in O(n^2) and then traversing it in O(n). Read More

Quantum computing is a promising approach of computation that is based on equations from Quantum Mechanics. A simulator for quantum algorithms must be capable of performing heavy mathematical matrix transforms. The design of the simulator itself takes one of three forms: Quantum Turing Machine, Network Model or circuit model of connected gates or, Quantum Programming Language, yet, some simulators are hybrid. Read More

We investigate the concept of symmetry and its role in problem solving. This paper first defines precisely the elements that constitute a "problem" and its "solution," and gives several examples to illustrate these definitions. Given precise definitions of problems, it is relatively straightforward to construct a search process for finding solutions. Read More

This paper introduces collaborating robots which provide the possibility of enhanced task performance, high reliability and decreased. Collaborating-bots are a collection of mobile robots able to self-assemble and to self-organize in order to solve problems that cannot be solved by a single robot. These robots combine the power of swarm intelligence with the flexibility of self-reconfiguration as aggregate Collaborating-bots can dynamically change their structure to match environmental variations. Read More

The need for data intensive Grids, and advanced networks with high performance that support our science has made the High Energy Physics community a leading and a key co-developer of leading edge wide area networks. This paper gives an overview of the status for the world's research networks and major international links used by the high energy physics and other scientific communities, showing some Future Internet testbed architectures, scalability, geographic scope, and extension between networks. The resemblance between wireless sensor network and future internet network, especially in scale consideration as density and network coverage, inspires us to adopt the models of the former to the later. Read More

Modeling spike firing assumes that spiking statistics are Poisson, but real data violates this assumption. To capture non-Poissonian features, in order to fix the inevitable inherent irregularity, researchers rescale the time axis with tedious computational overhead instead of searching for another distribution. Spikes or action potentials are precisely-timed changes in the ionic transport through synapses adjusting the synaptic weight, successfully modeled and developed as a memristor. Read More

There are many new forms of interfacing human users to machines. We persevere here electric mechanical form of interaction between human and machine. The emergence of brain-computer interface allows mind-to-movement systems. Read More

Most optimization problems in real life applications are often highly nonlinear. Local optimization algorithms do not give the desired performance. So, only global optimization algorithms should be used to obtain optimal solutions. Read More

There is a need for new metaphors from immunology to flourish the application areas of Artificial Immune Systems. A metaheuristic called Obesity Heuristic derived from advances in obesity treatment is proposed. The main forces of the algorithm are the generation omega-6 and omega-3 fatty acids. Read More

For a mobile robot to be truly autonomous, it must solve the simultaneous localization and mapping (SLAM) problem. We develop a new metaheuristic algorithm called Simulated Tom Thumb (STT), based on the detailed adventure of the clever Tom Thumb and advances in researches relating to path planning based on potential functions. Investigations show that it is very promising and could be seen as an optimization of the powerful solution of SLAM with data association and learning capabilities. Read More

Data association methods are used by autonomous robots to find matches between the current landmarks and the new set of observed features. We seek a framework for opinion mining to benefit from advancements in autonomous robot navigation in both research and development Read More

This paper collects heuristics of Go Game and employs them to achieve coverage of dense wireless sensor networks. In this paper, we propose an algorithm based on Go heuristics and validate it. Investigations show that it is very promising and could be seen as a good optimization. Read More

Iris recognition is considered as one of the best biometric methods used for human identification and verification, this is because of its unique features that differ from one person to another, and its importance in the security field. This paper proposes an algorithm for iris recognition and classification using a system based on Local Binary Pattern and histogram properties as a statistical approaches for feature extraction, and Combined Learning Vector Quantization Classifier as Neural Network approach for classification, in order to build a hybrid model depends on both features. The localization and segmentation techniques are presented using both Canny edge detection and Hough Circular Transform in order to isolate an iris from the whole eye image and for noise detection . Read More

Negation as failure and incomplete information in logic programs have been studied by many researchers In order to explains HOW a negated conclusion was reached, we introduce and proof a different way for negating facts to overcoming misleads in logic programs. Negating facts can be achieved by asking the user for constants that do not appear elsewhere in the knowledge base. Read More