M. Lisanti - Editor

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Name
M. Lisanti
Affiliation
Editor
City
Rio Rico
Country
United States

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High Energy Physics - Phenomenology (35)
 
Cosmology and Nongalactic Astrophysics (22)
 
High Energy Physics - Experiment (7)
 
Astrophysics of Galaxies (4)
 
High Energy Astrophysical Phenomena (4)
 
Quantum Physics (3)
 
Astrophysics (1)
 
Physics - Instrumentation and Detectors (1)
 
Nuclear Experiment (1)

Publications Authored By M. Lisanti

2016Aug
Authors: Jim Alexander, Marco Battaglieri, Bertrand Echenard, Rouven Essig, Matthew Graham, Eder Izaguirre, John Jaros, Gordan Krnjaic, Jeremy Mardon, David Morrissey, Tim Nelson, Maxim Perelstein, Matt Pyle, Adam Ritz, Philip Schuster, Brian Shuve, Natalia Toro, Richard G Van De Water, Daniel Akerib, Haipeng An, Konrad Aniol, Isaac J. Arnquist, David M. Asner, Henning O. Back, Keith Baker, Nathan Baltzell, Dipanwita Banerjee, Brian Batell, Daniel Bauer, James Beacham, Jay Benesch, James Bjorken, Nikita Blinov, Celine Boehm, Mariangela Bondí, Walter Bonivento, Fabio Bossi, Stanley J. Brodsky, Ran Budnik, Stephen Bueltmann, Masroor H. Bukhari, Raymond Bunker, Massimo Carpinelli, Concetta Cartaro, David Cassel, Gianluca Cavoto, Andrea Celentano, Animesh Chaterjee, Saptarshi Chaudhuri, Gabriele Chiodini, Hsiao-Mei Sherry Cho, Eric D. Church, D. A. Cooke, Jodi Cooley, Robert Cooper, Ross Corliss, Paolo Crivelli, Francesca Curciarello, Annalisa D'Angelo, Hooman Davoudiasl, Marzio De Napoli, Raffaella De Vita, Achim Denig, Patrick deNiverville, Abhay Deshpande, Ranjan Dharmapalan, Bogdan Dobrescu, Sergey Donskov, Raphael Dupre, Juan Estrada, Stuart Fegan, Torben Ferber, Clive Field, Enectali Figueroa-Feliciano, Alessandra Filippi, Bartosz Fornal, Arne Freyberger, Alexander Friedland, Iftach Galon, Susan Gardner, Francois-Xavier Girod, Sergei Gninenko, Andrey Golutvin, Stefania Gori, Christoph Grab, Enrico Graziani, Keith Griffioen, Andrew Haas, Keisuke Harigaya, Christopher Hearty, Scott Hertel, JoAnne Hewett, Andrew Hime, David Hitlin, Yonit Hochberg, Roy J. Holt, Maurik Holtrop, Eric W. Hoppe, Todd W. Hossbach, Lauren Hsu, Phil Ilten, Joe Incandela, Gianluca Inguglia, Kent Irwin, Igal Jaegle, Robert P. Johnson, Yonatan Kahn, Grzegorz Kalicy, Zhong-Bo Kang, Vardan Khachatryan, Venelin Kozhuharov, N. V. Krasnikov, Valery Kubarovsky, Eric Kuflik, Noah Kurinsky, Ranjan Laha, Gaia Lanfranchi, Dale Li, Tongyan Lin, Mariangela Lisanti, Kun Liu, Ming Liu, Ben Loer, Dinesh Loomba, Valery E. Lyubovitskij, Aaron Manalaysay, Giuseppe Mandaglio, Jeremiah Mans, W. J. Marciano, Thomas Markiewicz, Luca Marsicano, Takashi Maruyama, Victor A. Matveev, David McKeen, Bryan McKinnon, Dan McKinsey, Harald Merkel, Jeremy Mock, Maria Elena Monzani, Omar Moreno, Corina Nantais, Sebouh Paul, Michael Peskin, Vladimir Poliakov, Antonio D Polosa, Maxim Pospelov, Igor Rachek, Balint Radics, Mauro Raggi, Nunzio Randazzo, Blair Ratcliff, Alessandro Rizzo, Thomas Rizzo, Alan Robinson, Andre Rubbia, David Rubin, Dylan Rueter, Tarek Saab, Elena Santopinto, Richard Schnee, Jessie Shelton, Gabriele Simi, Ani Simonyan, Valeria Sipala, Oren Slone, Elton Smith, Daniel Snowden-Ifft, Matthew Solt, Peter Sorensen, Yotam Soreq, Stefania Spagnolo, James Spencer, Stepan Stepanyan, Jan Strube, Michael Sullivan, Arun S. Tadepalli, Tim Tait, Mauro Taiuti, Philip Tanedo, Rex Tayloe, Jesse Thaler, Nhan V. Tran, Sean Tulin, Christopher G. Tully, Sho Uemura, Maurizio Ungaro, Paolo Valente, Holly Vance, Jerry Vavra, Tomer Volansky, Belina von Krosigk, Andrew Whitbeck, Mike Williams, Peter Wittich, Bogdan Wojtsekhowski, Wei Xue, Jong Min Yoon, Hai-Bo Yu, Jaehoon Yu, Tien-Tien Yu, Yue Zhang, Yue Zhao, Yiming Zhong, Kathryn Zurek

This report, based on the Dark Sectors workshop at SLAC in April 2016, summarizes the scientific importance of searches for dark sector dark matter and forces at masses beneath the weak-scale, the status of this broad international field, the important milestones motivating future exploration, and promising experimental opportunities to reach these milestones over the next 5-10 years. Read More

We propose two-dimensional materials as targets for direct detection of dark matter. Using graphene as an example, we focus on the case where dark matter scattering deposits sufficient energy on a valence-band electron to eject it from the target. We show that the sensitivity of graphene to dark matter of MeV to GeV mass can be comparable, for similar exposure and background levels, to that of semiconductor targets such as silicon and germanium. Read More

Astrophysical sources outside the Milky Way, such as active galactic nuclei and star-forming galaxies, leave their imprint on the gamma-ray sky as nearly isotropic emission referred to as the Extragalactic Gamma-Ray Background (EGB). While the brightest of these sources may be individually resolved, their fainter counterparts contribute diffusely. In this work, we use a recently-developed analysis method, called the Non-Poissonian Template Fit, on up to 93 months of publicly-available data from the Fermi Large Area Telescope to determine the properties of the point sources that comprise the EGB. Read More

Rotation curve measurements provided the first strong indication that a significant fraction of matter in the Universe is non-baryonic. Since then, a tremendous amount of progress has been made on both the theoretical and experimental fronts in the search for this missing matter, which we now know constitutes nearly 85% of the Universe's matter density. These series of lectures, first given at the TASI 2015 summer school, provide an introduction to the basics of dark matter physics. Read More

One of the next frontiers in dark-matter direct-detection experiments is to explore the MeV to GeV mass regime. Such light dark matter does not carry enough kinetic energy to produce an observable nuclear recoil, but it can scatter off electrons, leading to a measurable signal. We introduce a semi-analytic approach to characterize the resulting electron-scattering events in atomic and semiconductor targets, improving on previous analytic proposals that underestimate the signal at high recoil energies. Read More

We present a new method to characterize unresolved point sources (PSs), generalizing traditional template fits to account for non-Poissonian photon statistics. We apply this method to Fermi Large Area Telescope gamma-ray data to characterize PS populations at high latitudes and in the Inner Galaxy. We find that PSs (resolved and unresolved) account for ~50% of the total extragalactic gamma-ray background in the energy range ~1. Read More

The dark matter may be a composite particle that is accessible via a weakly coupled portal. If these hidden-sector states are produced at the Large Hadron Collider (LHC), they would undergo a QCD-like shower. This would result in a spray of stable invisible dark matter along with unstable states that decay back to the Standard Model. Read More

Data from the Fermi Large Area Telescope suggests that there is an extended excess of GeV gamma-ray photons in the Inner Galaxy. Identifying potential astrophysical sources that contribute to this excess is an important step in verifying whether the signal originates from annihilating dark matter. In this paper, we focus on the potential contribution of unresolved point sources, such as millisecond pulsars (MSPs). Read More

Tidal debris from infalling satellites can leave observable structure in the phase-space distribution of the Galactic halo. Such substructure can be manifest in the spatial and/or velocity distributions of the stars in the halo. This paper focuses on a class of substructure that is purely kinematic in nature, with no accompanying spatial features. Read More

Neutrino capture on tritium has emerged as a promising method for detecting the cosmic neutrino background (CvB). We show that relic neutrinos are captured most readily when their spin vectors are anti-aligned with the polarization axis of the tritium nuclei and when they approach along the direction of polarization. As a result, CvB observatories may measure anisotropies in the cosmic neutrino velocity and spin distributions by polarizing the tritium targets. Read More

The cosmic neutrino background (CvB), produced about one second after the Big Bang, permeates the Universe today. New technological advancements make neutrino capture on beta-decaying nuclei (NCB) a clear path forward towards the detection of the CvB. We show that gravitational focusing by the Sun causes the expected neutrino capture rate to modulate annually. Read More

QCD is often the dominant background to new physics searches for which jet substructure provides a useful handle. Due to the challenges associated with modeling this background, data-driven approaches are necessary. This paper presents a novel method for determining QCD predictions using templates -- probability distribution functions for jet substructure properties as a function of kinematic inputs. Read More

We show that Big Bang Nucleosynthesis (BBN) significantly constrains axion-like dark matter. The axion acts like an oscillating QCD $\theta$ angle that redshifts in the early universe, increasing the neutron-proton mass difference at neutron freeze-out. An axion-like particle that couples too strongly to QCD results in the underproduction of 4He during BBN and is thus excluded. Read More

The scattering rate at dark-matter direct-detection experiments should modulate annually due to the Earth's orbit around the Sun. The rate is typically thought to be extremized around June 1, when the relative velocity of the Earth with respect to the dark-matter wind is maximal. We point out that gravitational focusing can alter this modulation phase. Read More

The count rate at dark-matter direct-detection experiments should modulate annually due to the motion of the Earth around the Sun. We show that higher-frequency modulations, including daily modulation, are also present and in some cases are nearly as strong as the annual modulation. These higher-order modes are particularly relevant if (i) the dark matter is light, O(10) GeV, (ii) the scattering is inelastic, or (iii) velocity substructure is present; for these cases, the higher-frequency modes are potentially observable at current and ton-scale detectors. Read More

A fermion triplet of SU(2)_L - a wino - is a well-motivated dark matter candidate. This work shows that present-day wino annihilations are constrained by indirect detection experiments, with the strongest limits coming from H.E. Read More

We propose a new search strategy for high-multiplicity hadronic final states. When new particles are produced at threshold, the distribution of their decay products is approximately isotropic. If there are many partons in the final state, it is likely that several will be clustered into the same large-radius jet. Read More

Direct detection experiments, which are designed to detect the scattering of dark matter off nuclei in detectors, are a critical component in the search for the Universe's missing matter. The count rate in these experiments should experience an annual modulation due to the relative motion of the Earth around the Sun. This modulation, not present for most known background sources, is critical for solidifying the origin of a potential signal as dark matter. Read More

There is evidence for a 130 GeV gamma-ray line at the Galactic Center in the Fermi Large Area Telescope data. Dark matter candidates that explain this feature should also annihilate to Standard Model particles, resulting in a continuous spectrum of photons. To study this continuum, we analyze the Fermi data down to 5 GeV, restricted to the inner 3 degrees of the Galaxy. Read More

This article introduces a new class of searches for physics beyond the Standard Model that improves the sensitivity to signals with high jet multiplicity. The proposed searches gain access to high multiplicity signals by reclustering events into large-radius, or "fat," jets and by requiring that each event has multiple massive jets. This technique is applied to supersymmetric scenarios in which gluinos are pair-produced and then subsequently decay to final states with either moderate quantities of missing energy or final states without missing energy. Read More

Tidal stripping of dark matter from subhalos falling into the Milky Way produces narrow, cold tidal streams as well as more spatially extended "debris flows" in the form of shells, sheets, and plumes. Here we focus on the debris flow in the Via Lactea II simulation, and show that this incompletely phase-mixed material exhibits distinctive high velocity behavior. Unlike tidal streams, which may not necessarily intersect the Earth's location, debris flow is spatially uniform at 8 kpc and thus guaranteed to be present in the dark matter flux incident on direct detection experiments. Read More

Direct production of electroweakly charged states may not produce the high energy jets or the significant missing energy required in many new physics searches at the LHC. However, because these states produce leptons, they are still potentially detectable over the sizeable Standard Model backgrounds. We show that current LHC Higgs searches, particularly in the WW* and ZZ* channels, are sensitive to new electroweak states, such as supersymmetric charginos or neutralinos. Read More

Searches for new physics in high-multiplicity events with little or no missing energy are an important component of the LHC program, complementary to analyses that rely on missing energy. We consider the potential reach of searches for events with a lepton and six or more jets, and show they can provide increased sensitivity to many supersymmetric and exotic models that would not be detected through standard missing-energy analyses. Among these are supersymmetric models with gauge mediation, R-parity violation, and light hidden sectors. Read More

We analyze the recently released CoGeNT data with a focus on their time-dependent properties. Using various statistical techniques, we confirm the presence of modulation in the data, and find a significant component at high (E_{ee} > 1.5$ keVee) energies. Read More

We show that subhalos falling into the Milky Way create a flow of tidally-stripped debris particles near the galactic center with characteristic velocity behavior. In the Via Lactea-II N-body simulation, this unvirialized component constitutes a few percent of the local density and has velocities peaked at 340 km/s in the solar neighborhood. Such velocity substructure has important implications for surveys of low-metallicity stars, as well as direct detection experiments sensitive to dark matter with large scattering thresholds. Read More

2011May
Authors: Daniele Alves1, Nima Arkani-Hamed2, Sanjay Arora3, Yang Bai4, Matthew Baumgart5, Joshua Berger6, Matthew Buckley7, Bart Butler8, Spencer Chang9, Hsin-Chia Cheng10, Clifford Cheung11, R. Sekhar Chivukula12, Won Sang Cho13, Randy Cotta14, Mariarosaria D'Alfonso15, Sonia El Hedri16, Rouven Essig17, Jared A. Evans18, Liam Fitzpatrick19, Patrick Fox20, Roberto Franceschini21, Ayres Freitas22, James S. Gainer23, Yuri Gershtein24, Richard Gray25, Thomas Gregoire26, Ben Gripaios27, Jack Gunion28, Tao Han29, Andy Haas30, Per Hansson31, JoAnne Hewett32, Dmitry Hits33, Jay Hubisz34, Eder Izaguirre35, Jared Kaplan36, Emanuel Katz37, Can Kilic38, Hyung-Do Kim39, Ryuichiro Kitano40, Sue Ann Koay41, Pyungwon Ko42, David Krohn43, Eric Kuflik44, Ian Lewis45, Mariangela Lisanti46, Tao Liu47, Zhen Liu48, Ran Lu49, Markus Luty50, Patrick Meade51, David Morrissey52, Stephen Mrenna53, Mihoko Nojiri54, Takemichi Okui55, Sanjay Padhi56, Michele Papucci57, Michael Park58, Myeonghun Park59, Maxim Perelstein60, Michael Peskin61, Daniel Phalen62, Keith Rehermann63, Vikram Rentala64, Tuhin Roy65, Joshua T. Ruderman66, Veronica Sanz67, Martin Schmaltz68, Stephen Schnetzer69, Philip Schuster70, Pedro Schwaller71, Matthew D. Schwartz72, Ariel Schwartzman73, Jing Shao74, Jessie Shelton75, David Shih76, Jing Shu77, Daniel Silverstein78, Elizabeth Simmons79, Sunil Somalwar80, Michael Spannowsky81, Christian Spethmann82, Matthew Strassler83, Shufang Su84, Tim Tait85, Brooks Thomas86, Scott Thomas87, Natalia Toro88, Tomer Volansky89, Jay Wacker90, Wolfgang Waltenberger, Itay Yavin, Felix Yu, Yue Zhao, Kathryn Zurek
Affiliations: 1Editor, 2Editor, 3Editor, 4Editor, 5Editor, 6Editor, 7Editor, 8Editor, 9Editor, 10Editor, 11Editor, 12Editor, 13Editor, 14Editor, 15Editor, 16Editor, 17Editor, 18Editor, 19Editor, 20Editor, 21Editor, 22Editor, 23Editor, 24Editor, 25Editor, 26Editor, 27Editor, 28Editor, 29Editor, 30Editor, 31Editor, 32Editor, 33Editor, 34Editor, 35Editor, 36Editor, 37Editor, 38Editor, 39Editor, 40Editor, 41Editor, 42Editor, 43Editor, 44Editor, 45Editor, 46Editor, 47Editor, 48Editor, 49Editor, 50Editor, 51Editor, 52Editor, 53Editor, 54Editor, 55Editor, 56Editor, 57Editor, 58Editor, 59Editor, 60Editor, 61Editor, 62Editor, 63Editor, 64Editor, 65Editor, 66Editor, 67Editor, 68Editor, 69Editor, 70Editor, 71Editor, 72Editor, 73Editor, 74Editor, 75Editor, 76Editor, 77Editor, 78Editor, 79Editor, 80Editor, 81Editor, 82Editor, 83Editor, 84Editor, 85Editor, 86Editor, 87Editor, 88Editor, 89Editor, 90Editor

This document proposes a collection of simplified models relevant to the design of new-physics searches at the LHC and the characterization of their results. Both ATLAS and CMS have already presented some results in terms of simplified models, and we encourage them to continue and expand this effort, which supplements both signature-based results and benchmark model interpretations. A simplified model is defined by an effective Lagrangian describing the interactions of a small number of new particles. Read More

Dark matter density profiles based upon Lambda-CDM cosmology motivate an ansatz velocity distribution function with fewer high velocity particles than the Maxwell-Boltzmann distribution or proposed variants. The high velocity tail of the distribution is determined by the outer slope of the dark matter halo, the large radius behavior of the Galactic dark matter density. N-body simulations of Galactic halos reproduce the high velocity behavior of this ansatz. Read More

The XENON100 and CRESST experiments will directly test the inelastic dark matter explanation for DAMA's 8.9? sigma anomaly. This article discusses how predictions for direct detection experiments depend on uncertainties in quenching factor measurements, the dark matter interaction with the Standard Model and the halo velocity distribution. Read More

The Large Hadron Collider presents an unprecedented opportunity to probe the realm of new physics in the TeV region and shed light on some of the core unresolved issues of particle physics. These include the nature of electroweak symmetry breaking, the origin of mass, the possible constituent of cold dark matter, new sources of CP violation needed to explain the baryon excess in the universe, the possible existence of extra gauge groups and extra matter, and importantly the path Nature chooses to resolve the hierarchy problem - is it supersymmetry or extra dimensions. Many models of new physics beyond the standard model contain a hidden sector which can be probed at the LHC. Read More

Recent experimental results indicate that the dark matter sector may have a non-minimal structure with a spectrum of states and interactions. Inelastic scattering has received particular attention in light of DAMA's annual modulation signal. Composite inelastic dark matter (CiDM) provides a dynamical origin for the mass splittings in inelastic dark matter models. Read More

Inelastic dark matter reconciles the DAMA anomaly with other null direct detection experiments and points to a non-minimal structure in the dark matter sector. In addition to the dominant inelastic interaction, dark matter scattering may have a subdominant elastic component. If these elastic interactions are suppressed at low momentum transfer, they will have similar nuclear recoil spectra to inelastic scattering events. Read More

Many models of electroweak symmetry breaking have an additional light pseudoscalar. If the Higgs boson can decay to a new pseudoscalar, LEP searches for the Higgs can be significantly altered and the Higgs can be as light as 86 GeV. Discovering the Higgs boson in these models is challenging when the pseudoscalar is lighter than 10 GeV because it decays dominantly into tau leptons. Read More

We present a proposal for performing model-independent jets plus missing energy searches. Currently, these searches are optimized for mSUGRA and are consequently not sensitive to all kinematically-accessible regions of parameter space. We show that the reach of these searches can be broadened by setting limits on the differential cross section as a function of the total visible energy and the missing energy. Read More

This letter describes how to perform searches over the complete kinematically-allowed parameter space for new pair-produced color octet particles that each subsequently decay into two jets plus missing energy at the Tevatron. This letter shows that current searches can miss otherwise discoverable spectra of particles due to CMSSM-motivated cuts. Optimizing the HT and MET cuts expands the sensitivity of these searches. Read More

The six Higgs doublet model is a minimal extension of the Standard Model that addresses dark matter and gauge coupling unification. Another Higgs doublet in a 5 representation of a discrete symmetry group, such as S_6, is added to the SM. The lightest components of the 5-Higgs are neutral, stable and serve as dark matter so long as the discrete symmetry is not broken. Read More

2005Dec
Affiliations: 1Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics, 2Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics, 3Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics, 4Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics, 5Leiden Observatory
Category: Astrophysics

We present Submillimeter Array observations of the Herbig Ae star HD169142 in 1.3 millimeter continuum emission and 12CO J=2-1 line emission at 1.5 arcsecond resolution that reveal a circumstellar disk. Read More

We have performed comparative measurements of the Casimir force between a metallic plate and a transparent sphere coated with metallic films of different thicknesses. We have observed that, if the thickness of the coating is less than the skin-depth of the electromagnetic modes that mostly contribute to the interaction, the force is significantly smaller than that measured with a thick bulk-like film. Our results provide the first direct evidence of the skin-depth effect on the Casimir force between metallic surfaces. Read More

We present systematic measurements of the Casimir force between a gold-coated plate and a sphere coated with a Hydrogen Switchable Mirror (HSM). HSMs are shiny metals that can become transparent by hydrogenation. In spite of such a dramatic change of the optical properties of the sphere, we did not observe any significant decrease of the Casimir force after filling the experimental apparatus with hydrogen. Read More

This article is divided in three sections. In the first section we briefly review some high precision experiments on the Casimir force, underlying an important aspect of the analysis of the data. In the second section we discuss our recent results in the measurement of the Casimir force using non-trivial materials. Read More