Lorenzo Natalucci - INAF-IAPS

Lorenzo Natalucci
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Lorenzo Natalucci
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INAF-IAPS
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High Energy Astrophysical Phenomena (19)
 
Instrumentation and Methods for Astrophysics (9)
 
Astrophysics (1)
 
Cosmology and Nongalactic Astrophysics (1)

Publications Authored By Lorenzo Natalucci

We report on the results of NuSTAR and XMM-Newton observations of the persistent X-ray source 1E1743.1-2843, located in the Galactic Center region. The source was observed between September and October 2012 by NuSTAR and XMM-Newton, providing almost simultaneous observations in the hard and soft X-ray bands. Read More

2015Dec
Affiliations: 1IHEP, Beijing, PRC, 2IHEP, Beijing, PRC, 3MIT Kavli Institute for Astrophysics and Space Research, Cambridge, U.S.A, 4ESAC-ESA, Madrid, Spain, 5MIT Kavli Institute for Astrophysics and Space Research, Cambridge, U.S.A, 6IASF-INAF, Roma, Italy, 7University of Tartu, Estonia

We summarize the outcome of the 10th meeting of the International Astronomical Consortium for High Energy Calibration (IACHEC), held in Beijing (People's Republic of China) in April 2015. Over 80 scientists directly involved in the calibration of operational and future high-energy missions gathered during 3.5 days to discuss the status of the X-ray payload inter-calibration, as well as possible ways to improve it. Read More

2015Oct
Affiliations: 1Washington University in Saint Louis, Physics Department and McDonnell Center for the Space Sciences, 2Jet Propulsion Laboratory, 3California Institute of Technology, Cahill Center for Astronomy and Astrophysics, 4Washington University in Saint Louis, Physics Department and McDonnell Center for the Space Sciences, 5Washington University in Saint Louis, Physics Department and McDonnell Center for the Space Sciences, 6Washington University in Saint Louis, Physics Department and McDonnell Center for the Space Sciences, 7Washington University in Saint Louis, Physics Department and McDonnell Center for the Space Sciences, 8Washington University in Saint Louis, Physics Department and McDonnell Center for the Space Sciences, 9Washington University in Saint Louis, Physics Department and McDonnell Center for the Space Sciences, 10Anton Pannekoek Institute for Astronomy, 11California Institute of Technology, Cahill Center for Astronomy and Astrophysics, 12California Institute of Technology, Cahill Center for Astronomy and Astrophysics, 13Jet Propulsion Laboratory, 14Jet Propulsion Laboratory, 15Rice University, Department of Physics and Astronomy, 16Washington University in Saint Louis, Physics Department and McDonnell Center for the Space Sciences, 17Georgia College, Department of Chemistry, Physics, and Astronomy, 18Jet Propulsion Laboratory, 19Jet Propulsion Laboratory, 20North-West University, Centre for Space Research, 21Technical University of Denmark, DTU Space, National Space Institute, 22Yale University, Department of Astronomy, 23Washington University in Saint Louis, Physics Department and McDonnell Center for the Space Sciences, 24University of Virginia, Department of Astronomy, 25MPI for Extraterrestrial Physics Garching, 26Durham University, Centre for Extragalactic Astronomy, Department of Physics, 27Jet Propulsion Laboratory, 28North Carolina State University, Department of Physics, 29Jet Propulsion Laboratory, 30Cambridge, Institute of Astronomy, UK, 31Penn State University, Department of Astronomy and Astrophysics, 32Jet Propulsion Laboratory, 33University of California, Berkeley, Department of Physics, 34ASI Science Data Center, Italy, 35California Institute of Technology, Cahill Center for Astronomy and Astrophysics, 36Cambridge, Institute of Astronomy, UK, 37Jet Propulsion Laboratory, 38Purdue University, Department of Physics and Astronomy, 39Texas Tech University, Physics Department, 40Nagoya University, Center for Experimental Studies, Kobayashi-Maskawa Institute for the Origin of Particles and the Universe, 41University of Maryland, Physics Department, 42RIKEN, 43Univ. of Michigan in Ann Arbor, Astronomy Dept, 44Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics, 45Istituto di Astrofisica e Planetologia Spaziali, INAF, 46Department of Astronomy/Steward Observatory, 47Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, 48Jet Propulsion Laboratory, 49Department of Astronomy/Steward Observatory, 50NASA Goddard Space Flight Center, 51Tohoku University, Astronomical Institute, 52NASA Goddard Space Flight Center

This paper describes the Polarization Spectroscopic Telescope Array (PolSTAR), a mission proposed to NASA's 2014 Small Explorer (SMEX) announcement of opportunity. PolSTAR measures the linear polarization of 3-50 keV (requirement; goal: 2.5-70 keV) X-rays probing the behavior of matter, radiation and the very fabric of spacetime under the extreme conditions close to the event horizons of black holes, as well as in and around magnetars and neutron stars. Read More

In June 2015, the source V404 Cygni (= GS2023+38) underwent an extraordinary outburst. We present the results obtained during the first revolution dedicated to this target by the INTEGRAL mission, and focus on the spectral behavior in the hard X-ray domain, using both SPI and IBIS instruments. The source exhibits extreme variability, and reaches fluxes of several tens of Crab. Read More

The black hole binary GS 2023+338 exhibited an unprecedently bright outburst on June 2015. Since June 17th, the high energy instruments on board INTEGRAL detected an extremely variable emission during both bright and low luminosity phases, with dramatic variations of the hardness ratio on time scales of ~seconds. The analysis of the IBIS and SPI data reveals the presence of hard spectra in the brightest phases, compatible with thermal Comptonization with temperature kTe ~ 40 keV. Read More

2015Jan
Affiliations: 1SSL/UCB, 2Caltech, 3Caltech, 4Caltech, 5Caltech, 6Caltech, 7IUCAA, 8MIT, 9Stanford, 10Univ. of Michigan, 11INAF-IAPS, 12JPL

As of 2014 August, the Nuclear Spectroscopic Telescope Array (NuSTAR) had observed ~30 X-ray binaries either as part of the planned program, as targets of opportunity, or for instrument calibration. The main science goals for the observations include probing the inner part of the accretion disk and constraining black hole spins via reflection components, providing the first observations of hard X-ray emission from quiescent Low Mass X-ray Binaries (LMXBs), measuring cyclotron lines from accreting pulsars, and studying type I X-ray bursts from neutron stars. Here, we describe the science objectives in more depth and give an overview of the NuSTAR observations that have been carried out to achieve the objectives. Read More

2014Jul
Affiliations: 1Inter University Centre for Astronomy and Astrophysics, India, 2INAF, Istituto di Astrofisica Spaziale e Fisica Cosmica, 3Space Sciences Laboratory, University of California, Berkeley, 4Istituto Nazionale di Astrofisica, INAF-IAPS, 5Physics Department and Santa Cruz Institute for Particle Physics, University of California, Santa Cruz, 6Cahill Center for Astronomy and Astrophysics, Caltech, 7Space Sciences Laboratory, University of California, Berkeley, 8Kavli Institute for Astrophysics and Space Research, MIT, 9DTU Space, National Space Institute, Technical University of Denmark, 10Space Sciences Laboratory, University of California, Berkeley, 11Cahill Center for Astronomy and Astrophysics, Caltech, 12Columbia Astrophysics Laboratory, Columbia University, 13Cahill Center for Astronomy and Astrophysics, Caltech, 14Space Sciences Laboratory, University of California, Berkeley, 15Cahill Center for Astronomy and Astrophysics, Caltech, 16Cahill Center for Astronomy and Astrophysics, Caltech, 17Jet Propulsion Laboratory, California Institute of Technology, 18USRA, NSSTC, 19NASA Goddard Space Flight Center

We present NuSTAR spectral and timing studies of the Supergiant Fast X-ray Transient (SFXT) IGR J17544-2619. The spectrum is well-described by a ~1 keV blackbody and a hard continuum component, as expected from an accreting X-ray pulsar. We detect a cyclotron line at 17 keV, confirming that the compact object in IGR J17544-2619 is indeed a neutron star. Read More

2014Feb
Affiliations: 1SSL/UCB, 2Columbia, 3ESO and Harvard, 4Universidad Diego Portales, 5Pontifica Universidad Catolica de Chile and SSI, 6SSL/UCB, 7SSL/UCB, 8DTU Space, 9SSL/UCB and LLNL, 10SSL/UCB, 11Harvard-Smithsonian CfA, 12Columbia, 13Caltech, 14SSL/UCB, 15INAF-IAPS, 16JPL, 17NASA/GSFC

During hard X-ray observations of the Norma spiral arm region by the Nuclear Spectroscopic Telescope Array (NuSTAR) in 2013 February, a new transient source, NuSTAR J163433-4738.7, was detected at a significance level of 8-sigma in the 3-10 keV bandpass. The source is consistent with having a constant NuSTAR count rate over a period of 40 ks and is also detected simultaneously by Swift at lower significance. Read More

We present an analysis of a short NuSTAR observation of the stellar-mass black hole and low-mass X-ray binary 4U 1630$-$472. Reflection from the inner accretion disk is clearly detected for the first time in this source, owing to the sensitivity of NuSTAR. With fits to the reflection spectrum, we find evidence for a rapidly spinning black hole, $a_{*}=0. Read More

2013Oct
Affiliations: 1Istituto di Astrofisica e Planetologia Spaziali, INAF, 2Space Sciences Laboratory, University of California, Berkeley, 3Istituto di Astrofisica e Planetologia Spaziali, INAF, 4Physics Dept. and Institute for Particle Physics, University of California, Santa Cruz, 5Universitè de Toulouse, 6Universitè de Toulouse, 7Space Sciences Laboratory, University of California, Berkeley, 8DTU Space, Technical University of Denmark, 9Space Sciences Laboratory, University of California, Berkeley, 10Istituto di Astrofisica e Planetologia Spaziali, INAF, 11Cahill Center for Astronomy and Astrophysics, Caltech, 12Cahill Center for Astronomy and Astrophysics, Caltech, 13Columbia Astrophysics Laboratory, Columbia University, 14Cahill Center for Astronomy and Astrophysics, Caltech, 15Space Sciences Laboratory, University of California, Berkeley, 16European Space Astronomy Centre, 17Dept. of Astronomy, University of Michigan, 18CRESST and NASA/GSFC, 19Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Caltech, 20Istituto di Astrofisica e Planetologia Spaziali, INAF, 21Cahill Center for Astronomy and Astrophysics, Caltech, 22NASA/GSFC

The microquasar 1E1740.7-2942, also known as the "Great Annihilator", was observed by NuSTAR in the Summer of 2012. We have analyzed in detail two observations taken ~2 weeks apart, for which we measure hard and smooth spectra typical of the low/hard state. Read More

2013Oct
Affiliations: 1SSL/UCB, 2MIT, 3Cambridge, 4Univ. of Michigan, 5Cambridge, 6Caltech, 7Univ. of Toulouse and CNRS, 8Univ. of Toulouse and CNRS, 9SSL/UCB, 10DTU Space, 11SSL/UCB and LLNL, 12Caltech, 13Caltech, 14Caltech, 15Columbia, 16Univ. of Michigan, 17Caltech, 18INAF-IAPS, 19CRESST, NASA/GSFC, and Univ. of Maryland, 20Holy Cross, 21JPL, 22Caltech, 23Dr. Karl-Remeis-Sternwarte and Erlangen Center for Astroparticle Physics, 24NASA/GSFC

The black hole binary Cygnus X-1 was observed in late-2012 with the Nuclear Spectroscopic Telescope Array (NuSTAR) and Suzaku, providing spectral coverage over the ~1-300 keV range. The source was in the soft state with a multi-temperature blackbody, power-law, and reflection components along with absorption from highly ionized material in the system. The high throughput of NuSTAR allows for a very high quality measurement of the complex iron line region as well as the rest of the reflection component. Read More

The NuSTAR hard X-ray telescope observed the transient Be/X-ray binary GS 0834-430 during its 2012 outburst - the first active state of this system observed in the past 19 years. We performed timing and spectral analysis, and measured the X-ray spectrum between 3-79keV with high statistical significance. We find the phase-averaged spectrum to be consistent with that observed in many other magnetized accreting pulsars. Read More

2013May
Affiliations: 1MIT, 2ESAC-ESA, 3IAPS-INAF, 4Tartu Observatory, 5MIT, CfA, 6ESAC-ESA, 7University of Leicester

We present the main results of the 8th International Astronomical Consortium for High Energy Calibration (IACHEC) meeting, held in Theddingworth, Leicestershire, between March 25 and 28, 2013. Over 50 scientists directly involved in the calibration of operational and future high-energy missions gathered during 3.5 days to discuss the status of the X-ray payload inter-calibration, as well as possible ways to improve it. Read More

2013Jan

The Nuclear Spectroscopic Telescope Array (NuSTAR) mission, launched on 13 June 2012, is the first focusing high-energy X-ray telescope in orbit. NuSTAR operates in the band from 3 -- 79 keV, extending the sensitivity of focusing far beyond the ~10 keV high-energy cutoff achieved by all previous X-ray satellites. The inherently low-background associated with concentrating the X-ray light enables NuSTAR to probe the hard X-ray sky with a more than one-hundred-fold improvement in sensitivity over the collimated or coded-mask instruments that have operated in this bandpass. Read More

The capability of NuSTAR to detect polarization in the Compton scattering regime (>50 keV) has been investigated. The NuSTAR mission, flown on June 2012 a Low Earth Orbit (LEO), provides a unique possibility to confirm the findings of INTEGRAL on the polarization of cosmic sources in the hard X-rays. Each of the two focal plane detectors are high resolution pixellated CZT arrays, sensitive in the energy range ~ 3 - 80 keV. Read More

Hard X / soft gamma-ray polarimetric analysis can be performed efficiently by the study of Compton scattering anisotropy in a detector composed of fine pixels. But in the energy range above 100 keV where sources flux are extremely weak and instrumental background very strong, such delicate measurement is actually very difficult to perform. Laue lens is an emerging technology based on diffraction in crystals allowing the concentration of soft gamma rays. Read More

2010Oct
Affiliations: 1NASA/MSFC, 2LSU, 3NASA/CRESST, 4METU/SDU, 5UAH, 6UAH, 7NSSTC, 8LSU, 9UAH, 10UAH, 11USRA, 12NASA/GSFC, 13MPE, 14NASA/GSFC, 15NPP/NASA/MSFC, 16LANL, 17NASA/MSFC, 18CRESST/NASA/GSFC/USRA, 19ESA/ESAC, 20USRA, 21INAF-IASF, 22UAH, 23UAH, 24LSU, 25UMD/CRESST/NASA/GSFC, 26UMD/CRESST/NASA/GSFC, 27USRA, 28MPE, 29MPE, 30MPE

The Crab Nebula is the only hard X-ray source in the sky that is both bright enough and steady enough to be easily used as a standard candle. As a result, it has been used as a normalization standard by most X-ray/gamma ray telescopes. Although small-scale variations in the nebula are well-known, since the start of science operations of the Fermi Gamma-ray Burst Monitor (GBM) in August 2008, a ~ 7% (70 mcrab) decline has been observed in the overall Crab Nebula flux in the 15 - 50 keV band, measured with the Earth occultation technique. Read More

Context. The Crab nebula has been used as a celestial calibration source of the X-ray flux and spectral shape for many years by X-ray astronomy missions. However, the object is often too bright for current and future missions equipped with instruments with improved sensitivity. Read More

The recent hard X-ray surveys performed by INTEGRAL and Swift have started to reveal the demographics of compact sources including Super-Massive Black Holes hosted in AGNs and have proven invaluable in tracking explosive events as the death of massive stars revealed by Gamma-Ray Bursts up to cosmological distances. Whereas the observations have contributed significantly to our understanding of the sources populations in the Local Universe, it has also become evident that revealing the processes that drive the birth and evolution of the first massive stars and galaxies would have required a further big step in both sensitivity and capability to study transient phenomena since their very beginning and covering different wavebands simultaneously. Therefore, after its decennial history as a proposed hard X-ray survey mission, EXIST has now turned into a new, more advanced concept with three instruments on board covering the IR/optical and X-ray/soft gamma-ray bands. Read More

Crystals are the elementary constituents of Laue lenses, an emerging technology which could allow the realization of a space borne telescope 10 to 100 times more sensitive than existing ones in the 100 keV - 1.5 MeV energy range. This study addresses the current endeavor to the development of efficient crystals for the realization of a Laue lens. Read More

2004Mar
Affiliations: 1SRON Utrecht, 2Utrecht University, 3SRON Utrecht, 4IASF/CNR Sezione Roma, 5IASF/CNR Sezione Roma, 6University of Southampton, 7ESTEC/ESA, 8IASF/CNR Sezione Roma, 9IASF/CNR Sezione Roma
Category: Astrophysics

We review the results obtained with the Galactic center campaigns of the BeppoSAX Wide Field X-ray Cameras (WFCs). This pertains to the study of luminous low-mass X-ray binaries (LMXBs). When pointed at the Galactic center, the WFC field of view contains more than half of the Galactic LMXB population. Read More