L. I. Bodine

L. I. Bodine
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L. I. Bodine
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Physics - Instrumentation and Detectors (4)
 
Nuclear Experiment (4)
 
High Energy Physics - Experiment (2)
 
High Energy Physics - Phenomenology (1)
 
Nuclear Theory (1)

Publications Authored By L. I. Bodine

2016Mar
Authors: M. Arenz, M. Babutzka, M. Bahr, J. P. Barrett, S. Bauer, M. Beck, A. Beglarian, J. Behrens, T. Bergmann, U. Besserer, J. Blümer, L. I. Bodine, K. Bokeloh, J. Bonn, B. Bornschein, L. Bornschein, S. Büsch, T. H. Burritt, S. Chilingaryan, T. J. Corona, L. De Viveiros, P. J. Doe, O. Dragoun, G. Drexlin, S. Dyba, S. Ebenhöch, K. Eitel, E. Ellinger, S. Enomoto, M. Erhard, D. Eversheim, M. Fedkevych, A. Felden, S. Fischer, J. A. Formaggio, F. Fränkle, D. Furse, M. Ghilea, W. Gil, F. Glück, A. Gonzalez Urena, S. Görhardt, S. Groh, S. Grohmann, R. Grössle, R. Gumbsheimer, M. Hackenjos, V. Hannen, F. Harms, N. Hauÿmann, F. Heizmann, K. Helbing, W. Herz, S. Hickford, D. Hilk, B. Hillen, T. Höhn, B. Holzapfel, M. Hötzel, M. A. Howe, A. Huber, A. Jansen, N. Kernert, L. Kippenbrock, M. Kleesiek, M. Klein, A. Kopmann, A. Kosmider, A. Kovalík, B. Krasch, M. Kraus, H. Krause, M. Krause, L. Kuckert, B. Kuffner, L. La Cascio, O. Lebeda, B. Leiber, J. Letnev, V. M. Lobashev, A. Lokhov, E. Malcherek, M. Mark, E. L. Martin, S. Mertens, S. Mirz, B. Monreal, K. Müller, M. Neuberger, H. Neumann, S. Niemes, M. Noe, N. S. Oblath, A. Off, H. -W. Ortjohann, A. Osipowicz, E. Otten, D. S. Parno, P. Plischke, A. W. P. Poon, M. Prall, F. Priester, P. C. -O. Ranitzsch, J. Reich, O. Rest, R. G. H. Robertson, M. Röllig, S. Rosendahl, S. Rupp, M. Rysavy, K. Schlösser, M. Schlösser, K. Schönung, M. Schrank, J. Schwarz, W. Seiler, H. Seitz-Moskaliuk, J. Sentkerestiova, A. Skasyrskaya, M. Slezak, A. Spalek, M. Steidl, N. Steinbrink, M. Sturm, M. Suesser, H. H. Telle, T. Thümmler, N. Titov, I. Tkachev, N. Trost, A. Unru, K. Valerius, D. Venos, R. Vianden, S. Vöcking, B. L. Wall, N. Wandkowsky, M. Weber, C. Weinheimer, C. Weiss, S. Welte, J. Wendel, K. L. Wierman, J. F. Wilkerson, D. Winzen, J. Wolf, S. Wüstling, M. Zacher, S. Zadoroghny, M. Zboril

The KATRIN experiment will probe the neutrino mass by measuring the beta-electron energy spectrum near the endpoint of tritium beta-decay. An integral energy analysis will be performed by an electro-static spectrometer (Main Spectrometer), an ultra-high vacuum vessel with a length of 23.2 m, a volume of 1240 m^3, and a complex inner electrode system with about 120000 individual parts. Read More

The beta decay of molecular tritium currently provides the highest sensitivity in laboratory-based neutrino mass measurements. The upcoming Karlsruhe Tritium Neutrino (KATRIN) experiment will improve the sensitivity to 0.2 eV, making a percent-level quantitative understanding of molecular effects essential. Read More

The focal-plane detector system for the KArlsruhe TRItium Neutrino (KATRIN) experiment consists of a multi-pixel silicon p-i-n-diode array, custom readout electronics, two superconducting solenoid magnets, an ultra high-vacuum system, a high-vacuum system, calibration and monitoring devices, a scintillating veto, and a custom data-acquisition system. It is designed to detect the low-energy electrons selected by the KATRIN main spectrometer. We describe the system and summarize its performance after its final installation. Read More

Semiconductor detectors in general have a dead layer at their surfaces that is either a result of natural or induced passivation, or is formed during the process of making a contact. Charged particles passing through this region produce ionization that is incompletely collected and recorded, which leads to departures from the ideal in both energy deposition and resolution. The silicon \textit{p-i-n} diode used in the KATRIN neutrino-mass experiment has such a dead layer. Read More

The Karlsruhe Tritium Neutrino Experiment (KATRIN) will detect tritium beta- decay electrons that pass through its electromagnetic spectrometer with a highly- segmented monolithic silicon pin-diode focal-plane detector (FPD). This pin-diode array will be on a single piece of 500-{\mu}m-thick silicon, with contact between titanium nitride (TiN) coated detector pixels and front-end electronics made by spring-loaded pogo pins. The pogo pins will exert a total force of up to 50N on the detector, deforming it and resulting in mechanical stress up to 50 MPa in the silicon bulk. Read More