Krzysztof Z. Stanek - Department of Astronomy and the Center for Cosmology and AstroParticle Physics, The Ohio State University

Krzysztof Z. Stanek
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Krzysztof Z. Stanek
Affiliation
Department of Astronomy and the Center for Cosmology and AstroParticle Physics, The Ohio State University
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Astrophysics (10)
 
Solar and Stellar Astrophysics (8)
 
Physics - Physics and Society (1)
 
Computer Science - Digital Libraries (1)
 
High Energy Astrophysical Phenomena (1)
 
Earth and Planetary Astrophysics (1)
 
Astrophysics of Galaxies (1)

Publications Authored By Krzysztof Z. Stanek

We report European Very Long Baseline Interferometry Network (EVN) radio continuum observations of ASASSN-14li, one of the best studied tidal disruption events (TDEs) to date. At 1.7 GHz with ~12x6mas resolution, the emission is unresolved. Read More

In some planet formation theories, protoplanets grow gravitationally within a young star's protoplanetary disk, a signature of which may be a localized disturbance in the disk's radial and/or vertical structure. Using time-series photometric observations by the Kilodegree Extremely Little Telescope South (KELT-South) project and the All-Sky Automated Survey for SuperNovae (ASAS-SN), combined with archival observations, we present the discovery of two extended dimming events of the young star, DM Ori. This young system faded by $\sim$1. Read More

Continuing the project described by Kato et al. (2009, arXiv:0905.1757), we collected times of superhump maxima for 128 SU UMa-type dwarf novae observed mainly during the 2015-2016 season and characterized these objects. Read More

2015Jul
Authors: Taichi Kato, Franz-Josef Hambsch, Pavol A. Dubovsky, Igor Kudzej, Berto Monard, Ian Miller, Hiroshi Itoh, Seiichiro Kiyota, Kazunari Masumoto, Daiki Fukushima, Hiroki Kinoshita, Kazuki Maeda, Jyunya Mikami, Risa Matsuda, Naoto Kojiguchi, Miho Kawabata, Megumi Takenaka, Katsura Matsumoto, Enrique de Miguel, Yutaka Maeda, Tomohito Ohshima, Keisuke Isogai, Roger D. Pickard, Arne Henden, Stella Kafka, Hidehiko Akazawa, Noritoshi Otani, Sakiko Ishibashi, Minako Ogi, Kenji Tanabe, Kazuyoshi Imamura, William Stein, Kiyoshi Kasai, Tonny Vanmunster, Peter Starr, Elena P. Pavlenko, Oksana I. Antonyuk, Kirill A. Antonyuk, Aleksei A. Sosnovskij, Nikolaj V. Pit, Julia V. Babina, Aleksandr Sklyanov, Rudolf Novak, Arto Oksanen, Shawn Dvorak, Raul Michel, Gianluca Masi, Colin Littlefield, Joseph Ulowetz, Sergey Yu. Shugarov, Polina Yu. Golysheva, Drahomir Chochol, Viktoriia Krushevska, Javier Ruiz, Tamas Tordai, Etienne Morelle, Richard Sabo, Hiroyuki Maehara, Michael Richmond, Natalia Katysheva, Kenji Hirosawa, William N. Goff, Franky Dubois, Ludwig Logie, Steve Rau, Irina B. Voloshina, Maksim V. Andreev, Kazuhiko Shiokawa, Vitaly V. Neustroev, George Sjoberg, Sergey Zharikov, Nick James, Greg Bolt, Tim Crawford, Denis Buczynski, Lewis M. Cook, Christopher S. Kochanek, Benjamin Shappee, Krzysztof Z. Stanek, Jose L. Prieto, Denis Denisenko, Hideo Nishimura, Masaru Mukai, Shizuo Kaneko, Seiji Ueda, Rod Stubbings, Masayuki Moriyama, Patrick Schmeer, Eddy Muyllaert, Jeremy Shears, Robert J. Modic, Kevin B. Paxson

Continuing the project described by Kato et al. (2009, arXiv:0905.1757), we collected times of superhump maxima for 102 SU UMa-type dwarf novae observed mainly during the 2014-2015 season and characterized these objects. Read More

2014Jun
Affiliations: 1Kyoto U

Continuing the project described by Kato et al. (2009, PASJ, 61, S395, arXiv:0905.1757), we collected times of superhump maxima for 56 SU UMa-type dwarf novae mainly observed during the 2013-2014 season and characterized these objects. Read More

2013Oct

Continuing the project described by Kato et al. (2009a, arXiv:0905.1757), we collected times of superhump maxima for SU UMa-type dwarf novae mainly observed during the 2012-2013 season. Read More

We are conducting a long-term photometric survey of the nearby galaxy M33 to discover Cepheids, eclipsing binaries, and long-period variables. The dataset combines previously-obtained optical images from the DIRECT project with new observations acquired at the WIYN 3.5m telescope. Read More

2008Jan
Affiliations: 1Department of Astronomy and the Center for Cosmology and AstroParticle Physics, The Ohio State University, 2Department of Astronomy and the Center for Cosmology and AstroParticle Physics, The Ohio State University, 3Department of Astronomy and the Center for Cosmology and AstroParticle Physics, The Ohio State University, 4Cosmic Radiation Laboratory, RIKEN, 5Kavli Institute for Particle Astrophysics and Cosmology, Stanford University
Category: Astrophysics

Difference imaging provides a new way to discover gravitationally lensed quasars because few non-lensed sources will show spatially extended, time variable flux. We test the method on lens candidates in the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) Supernova Survey region from the SDSS Quasar Lens Search (SQLS) and their surrounding fields. Starting from 20768 sources, including 49 SDSS quasars and 36 candidate lenses/lensed images, we find that 21 sources including 15 SDSS QSOs and 7 candidate lenses/lensed images are non-periodic variable sources. Read More

2007Sep
Affiliations: 1Ohio State University, 2Ohio State University, 3Ohio State University, 4Ohio State University
Category: Astrophysics

The association of long gamma-ray bursts with supernovae naturally suggests that the cosmic GRB rate should trace the star formation history. Finding otherwise would provide important clues concerning these rare, curious phenomena. Using a new estimate of Swift GRB energetics to construct a sample of 36 luminous GRBs with redshifts in the range z=0-4, we find evidence of enhanced evolution in the GRB rate, with ~4 times as many GRBs observed at z~4 than expected from star formation measurements. Read More

We investigate how the different types of supernovae are relatively affected by the metallicity of their host galaxy. We match the SAI Supernova Catalog to the SDSS-DR4 catalog of star-forming galaxies with measured metallicities. These supernova host galaxies span a range of oxygen abundance from 12 + log(O/H) = 7. Read More

Inspired by a recent astro-ph posting, I propose a creation of an Alternative History astro-ph archive (althistastro-ph). Such an archive would serve as a final resting place for the various telescope (and possibly other) proposals that were not successful. As we all know, from both submitting proposals and also from serving on various time allocation committees, many excellent proposals ``do not make it''. Read More

2006May
Affiliations: 1The Ohio State University, 2The Ohio State University, 3The Ohio State University, 4The Ohio State University, 5The Ohio State University, 6The Ohio State University, 7The Ohio State University
Category: Astrophysics

We examine the recent report by Prochter et al. (2006) that gamma-ray burst (GRB) sight lines have a much higher incidence of strong MgII absorption than quasar sight lines. We propose that the discrepancy is due to the different beam sizes of GRBs and quasars, and that the intervening MgII systems are clumpy with the dense part of each cloudlet of a similar size as the quasars, i. Read More

We present precise, ~1%, r-band relative photometry of the unusual solar system object (90377) Sedna. Our data consist of 143 data points taken over eight nights in October 2004 and January 2005. The RMS variability over the longest contiguous stretch of five nights of data spanning nine days is only 1. Read More

Accurate masses and, in general, all fundamental parameters of distant stars can only be measured in eclipsing binaries. Several massive star candidates with masses near 200 Mo exist, however they have large uncertainties associated with them. The most massive binary ever measured accurately is WR 20a, for which we present the light curve. Read More

We propose that the extraordinary ``winking star'' KH 15D is an eccentric pre-main-sequence binary that is gradually being occulted by an opaque screen. This model accounts for the periodicity, depth, duration, and rate of growth of the modern eclipses; the historical light curve from photographic plates; and the existing radial velocity measurements. It also explains the re-brightening events that were previously observed during eclipses, and the subsequent disappearance of these events. Read More

The gamma-ray burst (GRB) 010222 is the brightest GRB detected to date by the BeppoSAX satellite. Prompt identification of the associated optical transient (OT) allowed for spectroscopy with the Tillinghast 1.5m telescope at F. Read More