K. J. Arnold - Department of Physics, University of California

K. J. Arnold
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Name
K. J. Arnold
Affiliation
Department of Physics, University of California
City
Zhengzhou Shi
Country
China

Pubs By Year

Pub Categories

 
Cosmology and Nongalactic Astrophysics (17)
 
Instrumentation and Methods for Astrophysics (15)
 
Quantum Physics (9)
 
Physics - Atomic Physics (8)
 
High Energy Physics - Phenomenology (8)
 
Physics - Instrumentation and Detectors (3)
 
High Energy Physics - Experiment (2)
 
High Energy Physics - Theory (2)
 
General Relativity and Quantum Cosmology (2)
 
Physics - Materials Science (1)
 
Physics - Optics (1)

Publications Authored By K. J. Arnold

We report an improved measurement of the cosmic microwave background (CMB) $B$-mode polarization power spectrum with the POLARBEAR experiment. By adding new data collected during the second season of observations (2013-2014) to re-analyzed data from the first season (2012-2013), we have reduced twofold the band-power uncertainties. The band powers are reported over angular multipoles $500 \leq \ell \leq 2100$, where the dominant $B$-mode signal is expected to be due to the gravitational lensing of $E$-modes. Read More

A continuously rotating half-wave plate (CRHWP) is a promising tool to improve the sensitivity to large angular scales in cosmic microwave background (CMB) polarization measurements. With a CRHWP, single detectors can measure all three of the Stokes parameters, $I$, $Q$ and $U$, thereby avoiding the set of systematic errors that can be introduced by mismatches in the properties of orthogonal detector pairs. We focus on the implementation of CRHWPs in large aperture telescopes (i. Read More

We realize a spin-1 Dicke model using magnetic sub-levels of the lowest F=1 hyperfine level of $^{87}$Rb atoms confined to a high finesse cavity. We study this system under conditions of imbalanced driving, which is predicted to have a rich phase diagram of nonequilibrium phases and phase transitions. We observe both super-radiant and oscillatory phases from the cavity output spectra as predicted by theory. Read More

2016Oct

This book lays out the scientific goals to be addressed by the next-generation ground-based cosmic microwave background experiment, CMB-S4, envisioned to consist of dedicated telescopes at the South Pole, the high Chilean Atacama plateau and possibly a northern hemisphere site, all equipped with new superconducting cameras. CMB-S4 will dramatically advance cosmological studies by crossing critical thresholds in the search for the B-mode polarization signature of primordial gravitational waves, in the determination of the number and masses of the neutrinos, in the search for evidence of new light relics, in constraining the nature of dark energy, and in testing general relativity on large scales. Read More

We report the first laser spectroscopy of the $^1$S$_0$ to $^3$D$_1$ clock transition in $^{175}$Lu$^+$. Clock operation is demonstrated on three pairs of Zeeman transitions, one pair from each hyperfine manifold of the $^3$D$_1$ term. We measure the hyperfine intervals of the $^3$D$_1$ to 10 ppb uncertainty and infer the optical frequency averaged over the three hyperfine transitions to be 353. Read More

POLARBEAR-2 (PB-2) is a cosmic microwave background (CMB) polarization experiment that will be located in the Atacama highland in Chile at an altitude of 5200 m. Its science goals are to measure the CMB polarization signals originating from both primordial gravitational waves and weak lensing. PB-2 is designed to measure the tensor to scalar ratio, r, with precision {\sigma}(r) < 0. Read More

Analysis of cosmic microwave background (CMB) datasets typically requires some filtering of the raw time-ordered data. Filtering is frequently used to minimize the impact of low frequency noise, atmospheric contributions and/or scan synchronous signals on the resulting maps. In this work we explicitly construct a general filtering operator, which can unambiguously remove any set of unwanted modes in the data, and then amend the map-making procedure in order to incorporate and correct for it. Read More

We show that it is possible to significantly reduce quadrupole and tensor polarizability shifts of a clock transition by operating at a judiciously chosen field-insensitive point. In some cases shifts are almost completely eliminated making the transition an effective J = 0 to J = 0 candidate. This significantly improves the feasibility of a recent proposal for clock operation with large ion crystals. Read More

Singly ionised Lutetium has recently been suggested as a potential clock candidate. Here we report a joint experimental and theoretical investigation of \ce{Lu^+}. Measurements relevant to practical clock operation are made and compared to atomic structure calculations. Read More

The readout of transition-edge sensor (TES) bolometers with a large multiplexing factor is key for the next generation Cosmic Microwave Background (CMB) experiment, Polarbear-2, having 7,588 TES bolometers. To enable the large arrays, we have been developing a readout system with a multiplexing factor of 40 in the frequency domain. Extending that architecture to 40 bolometers requires an increase in the bandwidth of the SQUID electronics above 4 MHz. Read More

We present an overview of the design and status of the \Pb-2 and the Simons Array experiments. \Pb-2 is a Cosmic Microwave Background polarimetry experiment which aims to characterize the arc-minute angular scale B-mode signal from weak gravitational lensing and search for the degree angular scale B-mode signal from inflationary gravitational waves. The receiver has a 365~mm diameter focal plane cooled to 270~milli-Kelvin. Read More

2015Sep

We constrain anisotropic cosmic birefringence using four-point correlations of even-parity $E$-mode and odd-parity $B$-mode polarization in the cosmic microwave background measurements made by the POLARization of the Background Radiation (POLARBEAR) experiment in its first season of observations. We find that the anisotropic cosmic birefringence signal from any parity-violating processes is consistent with zero. The Faraday rotation from anisotropic cosmic birefringence can be compared with the equivalent quantity generated by primordial magnetic fields if they existed. Read More

We investigate the feasibility of precision frequency metrology with large ion crystals. For clock candidates with a negative differential static polarisability, we show that micromotion effects should not impede the performance of the clock. Using Lu+ as a specific example, we show that quadrupole shifts due to the electric fields from neighbouring ions do not significantly affect clock performance. Read More

Atmosphere is one of the most important noise sources for ground-based cosmic microwave background (CMB) experiments. By increasing optical loading on the detectors, it amplifies their effective noise, while its fluctuations introduce spatial and temporal correlations between detected signals. We present a physically motivated 3d-model of the atmosphere total intensity emission in the millimeter and sub-millimeter wavelengths. Read More

POLARBEAR-2 is a next-generation receiver for precision measurements of the polarization of the cosmic microwave background (Cosmic Microwave Background (CMB)). Scheduled to deploy in early 2015, it will observe alongside the existing POLARBEAR-1 receiver, on a new telescope in the Simons Array on Cerro Toco in the Atacama desert of Chile. For increased sensitivity, it will feature a larger area focal plane, with a total of 7,588 polarization sensitive antenna-coupled Transition Edge Sensor (TES) bolometers, with a design sensitivity of 4. Read More

We describe the design of a new polarization sensitive receiver, SPT-3G, for the 10-meter South Pole Telescope (SPT). The SPT-3G receiver will deliver a factor of ~20 improvement in mapping speed over the current receiver, SPTpol. The sensitivity of the SPT-3G receiver will enable the advance from statistical detection of B-mode polarization anisotropy power to high signal-to-noise measurements of the individual modes, i. Read More

We realize an open version of the Dicke model by coupling two hyperfine ground states using two cavity-assisted Raman transitions. The interaction due to only one of the couplings is described by the Tavis-Cummings model and we observe a normal mode splitting in the transmission around the dispersively shifted cavity. With both couplings present the dynamics are described by the Dicke model and we measure the onset of superradiant scattering into the cavity above a critical coupling strength. Read More

We report a measurement of the B-mode polarization power spectrum in the cosmic microwave background (CMB) using the POLARBEAR experiment in Chile. The faint B-mode polarization signature carries information about the Universe's entire history of gravitational structure formation, and the cosmic inflation that may have occurred in the very early Universe. Our measurement covers the angular multipole range 500 < l < 2100 and is based on observations of an effective sky area of 25 square degrees with 3. Read More

We reconstruct the gravitational lensing convergence signal from Cosmic Microwave Background (CMB) polarization data taken by the POLARBEAR experiment and cross-correlate it with Cosmic Infrared Background (CIB) maps from the Herschel satellite. From the cross-spectra, we obtain evidence for gravitational lensing of the CMB polarization at a statistical significance of 4.0$\sigma$ and evidence for the presence of a lensing $B$-mode signal at a significance of 2. Read More

Gravitational lensing due to the large-scale distribution of matter in the cosmos distorts the primordial Cosmic Microwave Background (CMB) and thereby induces new, small-scale $B$-mode polarization. This signal carries detailed information about the distribution of all the gravitating matter between the observer and CMB last scattering surface. We report the first direct evidence for polarization lensing based on purely CMB information, from using the four-point correlations of even- and odd-parity $E$- and $B$-mode polarization mapped over $\sim30$ square degrees of the sky measured by the POLARBEAR experiment. Read More

Fluctuations in the intensity and polarization of the cosmic microwave background (CMB) and the large-scale distribution of matter in the universe each contain clues about the nature of the earliest moments of time. The next generation of CMB and large-scale structure (LSS) experiments are poised to test the leading paradigm for these earliest moments---the theory of cosmic inflation---and to detect the imprints of the inflationary epoch, thereby dramatically increasing our understanding of fundamental physics and the early universe. A future CMB experiment with sufficient angular resolution and frequency coverage that surveys at least 1% of the sky to a depth of 1 uK-arcmin can deliver a constraint on the tensor-to-scalar ratio that will either result in a 5-sigma measurement of the energy scale of inflation or rule out all large-field inflation models, even in the presence of foregrounds and the gravitational lensing B-mode signal. Read More

This is a report on the status and prospects of the quantification of neutrino properties through the cosmological neutrino background for the Cosmic Frontier of the Division of Particles and Fields Community Summer Study long-term planning exercise. Experiments planned and underway are prepared to study the cosmological neutrino background in detail via its influence on distance-redshift relations and the growth of structure. The program for the next decade described in this document, including upcoming spectroscopic galaxy surveys eBOSS and DESI and a new Stage-IV CMB polarization experiment CMB-S4, will achieve sigma(sum m_nu) = 16 meV and sigma(N_eff) = 0. Read More

The POLARBEAR-2 CosmicMicrowave Background (CMB) experiment aims to observe B-mode polarization with high sensitivity to explore gravitational lensing of CMB and inflationary gravitational waves. POLARBEAR-2 is an upgraded experiment based on POLARBEAR-1, which had first light in January 2012. For POLARBEAR-2, we will build a receiver that has 7,588 Transition Edge Sensor (TES) bolometers coupled to two-band (95 and 150 GHz) polarization-sensitive antennas. Read More

We describe the design, fabrication, and testing of a broadband log-periodic antenna coupled to multiple cryogenic bolometers. This detector architecture, optimized here for astrophysical observations, simultaneously receives two linear polarizations with two octaves of bandwidth at millimeter wavelengths. The broad bandwidth signal received by the antenna is divided into sub-bands with integrated in-line frequency-selective filters. Read More

We are developing multi-chroic antenna-coupled TES detectors for CMB polarimetry. Multi-chroic detectors increase the mapping speed per focal plane area and provide greater discrimination of polarized galactic foregrounds with no increase in weight or cryogenic cost. In each pixel, a silicon lens-coupled dual polarized sinuous antenna collects light over a two-octave frequency band. Read More

2012Oct
Affiliations: 1Department of Physics, University of California, 2School of Physics and Astronomy, University of Cardiff, 3Department of Astrophysical and Planetary Sciences, University of Colorado, 4Center for Astrophysics and Space Sciences, University of California, San Diego, 5Center for Astrophysics and Space Sciences, University of California, San Diego, 6Computational Cosmology Center, Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, 7Dalhousie University, 8High Energy Accelerator Research Organization, 9Physics Department, McGill University, 10Laboratoire Astroparticule et Cosmologie, 11Laboratoire Astroparticule et Cosmologie, 12Department of Physics, University of California, 13Center for Astrophysics and Space Sciences, University of California, San Diego, 14Department of Physics, University of California, 15Rutherford Appleton Laboratory, STFC, 16Department of Astrophysical and Planetary Sciences, University of Colorado, 17High Energy Accelerator Research Organization, 18High Energy Accelerator Research Organization, 19High Energy Accelerator Research Organization, 20Department of Physics, University of California, 21Department of Physics, University of California, 22Physics Department, Austin College, 23Physics Division, Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, 24Center for Astrophysics and Space Sciences, University of California, San Diego, 25Department of Physics, University of California, 26Computational Cosmology Center, Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, 27Laboratoire Astroparticule et Cosmologie, 28Department of Physics, University of California, 29Rutherford Appleton Laboratory, STFC, 30Department of Physics, University of California, 31Center for Astrophysics and Space Sciences, University of California, San Diego, 32High Energy Accelerator Research Organization, 33Center for Astrophysics and Space Sciences, University of California, San Diego, 34Department of Physics, University of California, 35High Energy Accelerator Research Organization, 36Center for Astrophysics and Space Sciences, University of California, San Diego, 37Department of Physics, University of California, 38Department of Physics, University of California, 39Center for Astrophysics and Space Sciences, University of California, San Diego, 40Department of Physics, University of California, 41Department of Physics, University of California, 42Department of Physics, University of California, 43Dalhousie University, 44High Energy Accelerator Research Organization, 45Department of Physics, University of California, 46Center for Astrophysics and Space Sciences, University of California, San Diego, 47Physics Division, Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, 48Center for Astrophysics and Space Sciences, University of California, San Diego, 49Physics Division, Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, 50Center for Astrophysics and Space Sciences, University of California, San Diego, 51Department of Physics, University of California, 52Laboratoire Astroparticule et Cosmologie, 53Department of Physics, University of California, 54High Energy Accelerator Research Organization, 55School of Physics and Astronomy, University of Cardiff, 56Department of Physics, University of California

The Polarbear Cosmic Microwave Background (CMB) polarization experiment is currently observing from the Atacama Desert in Northern Chile. It will characterize the expected B-mode polarization due to gravitational lensing of the CMB, and search for the possible B-mode signature of inflationary gravitational waves. Its 250 mK focal plane detector array consists of 1,274 polarization-sensitive antenna-coupled bolometers, each with an associated lithographed band-defining filter. Read More

We derive threshold equations for self-organization of laser driven atoms in an optical cavity. Our analysis includes probing with either a traveling wave or a retro reflected lattice. These two scenarios lead to qualitatively different behavior in terms of the response of the system as a function of cavity detuning with respect to the probe. Read More

Vbfnlo is a flexible parton level Monte Carlo program for the simulation of vector boson fusion (VBF), double and triple vector boson (plus jet) production in hadronic collisions at next-to-leading order (NLO) in the strong coupling constant, as well as Higgs boson plus two jet production via gluon fusion at the one-loop level. This note briefly describes the main additional features and processes that have been added in the new release -- Vbfnlo Version 2.6. Read More

A new release of the Monte Carlo event generator Herwig++ (version 2.6) is now available. This version comes with a number of improvements including: a new structure for the implementation of next-to-leading order matrix elements; an improved treatment of wide-angle gluon radiation; new hard-coded next-to-leading order matrix elements for deep inelastic scattering and weak vector boson fusion; additional models of physics beyond the Standard Model, including the production of colour sextet particles; a statistical colour reconnection model; automated energy scaling of underlying-event tunes. Read More

We make a detailed experimental study of the threshold for the self-organization of thermal 87Rb atoms coupled to a high-finesse cavity over a range of atom numbers and cavity detunings. We investigate the difference between probing with a traveling wave and a retroreflected lattice. These two scenarios lead to qualitatively different behavior in terms of the response of the system as a function of cavity detuning with respect to the probe. Read More

We present next-to-leading order QCD corrections to Higgs production in association with a photon via weak boson fusion at a hadron collider. Utilizing the fully flexible parton level Monte-Carlo program VBFNLO, we find small overall corrections, while the shape of some distributions is sensitive to radiative contributions in certain regions of phase-space. Residual scale uncertainties at next-to-leading order are at the few-percent level. Read More

Observations of the temperature anisotropy of the Cosmic Microwave Background (CMB) lend support to an inflationary origin of the universe, yet no direct evidence verifying inflation exists. Many current experiments are focussing on the CMB's polarization anisotropy, specifically its curl component (called "B-mode" polarization), which remains undetected. The inflationary paradigm predicts the existence of a primordial gravitational wave background that imprints a unique B-mode signature on the CMB's polarization at large angular scales. Read More

We study the transmission spectra of ultracold rubidium atoms coupled to a high-finesse optical cavity. Under weak probing with pi-polarized light, the linear response of the system is that of a collective spin with multiple levels coupled to a single mode of the cavity. By varying the atom number, we change the collective coupling of the system. Read More

We report the all-optical production of a Rb87 Bose-Einstein condensate (BEC) in a simple 1.06 micron dipole trap experiment. We load a single beam dipole trap directly from a magneto-optic trap (MOT) using an optimized loading sequence. Read More

2010Nov
Affiliations: 1Laboratoire Astroparticule & Cosmologie, 2School of Physics and Astronomy, University of Cardiff, U.K, 3Department of Astrophysical and Planetary Sciences, University of Colorado, U.S, 4Department of Physics, University of California, Berkeley U.S, 5Physics Department, McGill University, Canada, 6Center for Astrophysics and Space Sciences, University of California, San Diego, U.S, 7Computational Cosmology Center, Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, U.S, 8Computational Cosmology Center, Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, U.S, 9Physics Department, McGill University, Canada, 10Department of Physics, University of California, Berkeley U.S, 11Department of Physics, University of California, Berkeley U.S, 12Department of Astrophysical and Planetary Sciences, University of Colorado, U.S, 13High Energy Accelerator Research Organization, 14Department of Physics, University of California, Berkeley U.S, 15Department of Physics, University of California, Berkeley U.S, 16Department of Physics, University of California, Berkeley U.S, 17Department of Physics, Imperial College, U.K, 18Center for Astrophysics and Space Sciences, University of California, San Diego, U.S, 19Computational Cosmology Center, Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, U.S, 20Department of Physics, University of California, Berkeley U.S, 21Department of Physics, University of California, Berkeley U.S, 22Physics Division, Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, Berkeley, U.S, 23Department of Physics, University of California, Berkeley U.S, 24High Energy Accelerator Research Organization, 25Center for Astrophysics and Space Sciences, University of California, San Diego, U.S, 26Department of Physics, University of California, Berkeley U.S, 27Department of Physics, University of California, Berkeley U.S, 28High Energy Accelerator Research Organization, 29Department of Physics, University of California, Berkeley U.S, 30Department of Physics, Imperial College, U.K, 31Department of Physics, University of California, Berkeley U.S, 32Center for Astrophysics and Space Sciences, University of California, San Diego, U.S, 33High Energy Accelerator Research Organization, 34Department of Physics, University of California, Berkeley U.S, 35Center for Astrophysics and Space Sciences, University of California, San Diego, U.S, 36Physics Division, Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, Berkeley, U.S, 37Department of Physics, University of California, Berkeley U.S, 38Laboratoire Astroparticule & Cosmologie, 39Department of Physics, University of California, Berkeley U.S, 40High Energy Accelerator Research Organization, 41Department of Physics, University of California, Berkeley U.S, 42School of Physics and Astronomy, University of Cardiff, U.K, 43Department of Physics, University of California, Berkeley U.S, 44Department of Physics, University of California, Berkeley U.S, 45Department of Physics, University of California, Berkeley U.S

We describe the Cosmic Microwave Background (CMB) polarization experiment called Polarbear. This experiment will use the dedicated Huan Tran Telescope equipped with a powerful 1,200-bolometer array receiver to map the CMB polarization with unprecedented accuracy. We summarize the experiment, its goals, and current status. Read More

Higgs boson production in association with a hard central photon and two forward tagging jets is expected to provide valuable information on Higgs boson couplings in a range where it is difficult to disentangle weak-boson fusion processes from large QCD backgrounds. We present next-to-leading order QCD corrections to Higgs production in association with a photon via weak-boson fusion at a hadron collider in the form of a flexible parton-level Monte Carlo program. The QCD corrections to integrated cross sections are found to be small for experimentally relevant selection cuts, while the shape of kinematic distributions can be distorted by up to 20% in some regions of phase space. Read More

At lowest order in perturbation theory, the scattering matrix element for Higgs boson production in association with dijets displays a strong correlation in the azimuthal angle between the dijets, induced by the CP-properties of the Higgs Boson coupling. However, the phase space cuts necessary for a clean extraction of the CP-properties simultaneously induce large corrections from emissions of hard radiation and thus formation of extra jets. The current study concerns the generalization of CP-studies using the azimuthal angle between dijets beyond tree-level and to events with more than just two jets. Read More

VBFNLO is a fully flexible parton level Monte Carlo program for the simulation of vector boson fusion, double and triple vector boson production in hadronic collisions at next-to-leading order in the strong coupling constant. VBFNLO includes Higgs and vector boson decays with full spin correlations and all off-shell effects. In addition, VBFNLO implements CP-even and CP-odd Higgs boson via gluon fusion, associated with two jets, at the leading-order one-loop level with the full top- and bottom-quark mass dependence in a generic two-Higgs-doublet model. Read More

We have studied intersubband decay of E22 excitons in semiconducting carbon nanotubes experimentally and theoretically. Photoluminescence excitation line widths of semiconducting nanotubes with chiral indicess (n, m) can be mapped onto a connectivity grid with curves of constant (n-m) and (2n+m). Moreover, the global behavior of E22 linewidths is best characterized by a strong increase with energy irrespective of their (n-m) mod(3)= \pm 1 family affiliation. Read More

We have studied the scalar perturbation of static charged dilaton black holes in 3+1 dimensions. The black hole considered here is a solution to the low-energy string theory in 3+1 dimensions. The quasinormal modes for the scalar perturbations are calculated using the third order WKB method. Read More