Joshua Pepper - Lehigh University

Joshua Pepper
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Name
Joshua Pepper
Affiliation
Lehigh University
City
Bethlehem
Country
United States

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Earth and Planetary Astrophysics (32)
 
Solar and Stellar Astrophysics (31)
 
Instrumentation and Methods for Astrophysics (6)
 
High Energy Astrophysical Phenomena (1)
 
Astrophysics of Galaxies (1)
 
Physics - Physics and Society (1)

Publications Authored By Joshua Pepper

RZ Psc is a young Sun-like star, long associated with the UXor class of variable stars, which is partially or wholly dimmed by dust clumps several times each year. The system has a bright and variable infrared excess, which has been interpreted as evidence that the dimming events are the passage of asteroidal fragments in front of the host star. Here, we present a decade of optical photometry of RZ Psc and take a critical look at the asteroid belt interpretation. Read More

2016Oct
Authors: Demitri Muna, Michael Alexander, Alice Allen, Richard Ashley, Daniel Asmus, Ruyman Azzollini, Michele Bannister, Rachael Beaton, Andrew Benson, G. Bruce Berriman, Maciej Bilicki, Peter Boyce, Joanna Bridge, Jan Cami, Eryn Cangi, Xian Chen, Nicholas Christiny, Christopher Clark, Michelle Collins, Johan Comparat, Neil Cook, Darren Croton, Isak Delberth Davids, Éric Depagne, John Donor, Leonardo A. dos Santos, Stephanie Douglas, Alan Du, Meredith Durbin, Dawn Erb, Daniel Faes, J. G. Fernández-Trincado, Anthony Foley, Sotiria Fotopoulou, Søren Frimann, Peter Frinchaboy, Rafael Garcia-Dias, Artur Gawryszczak, Elizabeth George, Sebastian Gonzalez, Karl Gordon, Nicholas Gorgone, Catherine Gosmeyer, Katie Grasha, Perry Greenfield, Rebekka Grellmann, James Guillochon, Mark Gurwell, Marcel Haas, Alex Hagen, Daryl Haggard, Tim Haines, Patrick Hall, Wojciech Hellwing, Edmund Christian Herenz, Samuel Hinton, Renee Hlozek, John Hoffman, Derek Holman, Benne Willem Holwerda, Anthony Horton, Cameron Hummels, Daniel Jacobs, Jens Juel Jensen, David Jones, Arna Karick, Luke Kelley, Matthew Kenworthy, Ben Kitchener, Dominik Klaes, Saul Kohn, Piotr Konorski, Coleman Krawczyk, Kyler Kuehn, Teet Kuutma, Michael T. Lam, Richard Lane, Jochen Liske, Diego Lopez-Camara, Katherine Mack, Sam Mangham, Qingqing Mao, David J. E. Marsh, Cecilia Mateu, Loïc Maurin, James McCormac, Ivelina Momcheva, Hektor Monteiro, Michael Mueller, Roberto Munoz, Rohan Naidu, Nicholas Nelson, Christian Nitschelm, Chris North, Juan Nunez-Iglesias, Sara Ogaz, Russell Owen, John Parejko, Vera Patrício, Joshua Pepper, Marshall Perrin, Timothy Pickering, Jennifer Piscionere, Richard Pogge, Radek Poleski, Alkistis Pourtsidou, Adrian M. Price-Whelan, Meredith L. Rawls, Shaun Read, Glen Rees, Hanno Rein, Thomas Rice, Signe Riemer-Sørensen, Naum Rusomarov, Sebastian F. Sanchez, Miguel Santander-García, Gal Sarid, William Schoenell, Aleks Scholz, Robert L. Schuhmann, William Schuster, Peter Scicluna, Marja Seidel, Lijing Shao, Pranav Sharma, Aleksandar Shulevski, David Shupe, Cristóbal Sifón, Brooke Simmons, Manodeep Sinha, Ian Skillen, Bjoern Soergel, Thomas Spriggs, Sundar Srinivasan, Abigail Stevens, Ole Streicher, Eric Suchyta, Joshua Tan, O. Grace Telford, Romain Thomas, Chiara Tonini, Grant Tremblay, Sarah Tuttle, Tanya Urrutia, Sam Vaughan, Miguel Verdugo, Alexander Wagner, Josh Walawender, Andrew Wetzel, Kyle Willett, Peter K. G. Williams, Guang Yang, Guangtun Zhu, Andrea Zonca

The Astropy Project (http://astropy.org) is, in its own words, "a community effort to develop a single core package for Astronomy in Python and foster interoperability between Python astronomy packages." For five years this project has been managed, written, and operated as a grassroots, self-organized, almost entirely volunteer effort while the software is used by the majority of the astronomical community. Read More

Be stars have generally been characterized by the emission lines in their spectra, and especially the time variability of those spectroscopic features. They are known to also exhibit photometric variability at multiple timescales, but have not been broadly compared and analyzed by that behavior. We have taken advantage of the advent of wide-field, long-baseline, and high-cadence photometric surveys that search for transiting exoplanets to perform a comprehensive analysis of brightness variations among a large number of known Be stars. Read More

We report the discovery of KELT-12b, a highly inflated Jupiter-mass planet transiting a mildly evolved host star. We identified the initial transit signal in the KELT-North survey data and established the planetary nature of the companion through precise follow-up photometry, high-resolution spectroscopy, precise radial velocity measurements, and high-resolution adaptive optics imaging. Our preferred best-fit model indicates that the $V = 10. Read More

The Planet Formation Imager (PFI) project aims to provide a strong scientific vision for ground-based optical astronomy beyond the upcoming generation of Extremely Large Telescopes. We make the case that a breakthrough in angular resolution imaging capabilities is required in order to unravel the processes involved in planet formation. PFI will be optimised to provide a complete census of the protoplanet population at all stellocentric radii and over the age range from 0. Read More

In some planet formation theories, protoplanets grow gravitationally within a young star's protoplanetary disk, a signature of which may be a localized disturbance in the disk's radial and/or vertical structure. Using time-series photometric observations by the Kilodegree Extremely Little Telescope South (KELT-South) project and the All-Sky Automated Survey for SuperNovae (ASAS-SN), combined with archival observations, we present the discovery of two extended dimming events of the young star, DM Ori. This young system faded by $\sim$1. Read More

The Kilodegree Extremely Little Telescope (KELT) survey is a ground-based program designed to search for transiting exoplanets orbiting relatively bright stars. To achieve this, the KELT Science Team operates two planets facilities - KELT-North, at Winer Observatory, Arizona, and KELT-South, at the South African Astronomical Observatory. The telescopes used at these observatories have particularly wide fields of view, allowing KELT to study a large number of potential exoplanet host stars. Read More

The century-long photometric record of the DASCH project provides a unique window into the variability of stars normally considered to be photometrically inactive. In this paper, we look for long-term trends in the brightness of F stars, with particular attention to KIC 8462852,an F3 main sequence star that has been identified as significant short-term variability according to Kepler observations. Although a simple search for variability suggests long-term dimming of a number of F stars, we find that such trends are artifacts of the 'Menzel Gap' in the DASCH data. Read More

We present a statistical analysis of the accuracy of the digitized magnitudes of photometric plates on the time scale of decades. In our examination of archival Johnson B photometry from the Harvard DASCH archive, we find a median RMS scatter of lightcurves of order 0.15mag over the range B~9-17 for all calibrations. Read More

In its three years of operation, the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS-III) Apache Point Observatory Galactic Evolution Experiment (APOGEE-1) observed $>$14,000 stars with enough epochs over a sufficient temporal baseline for the fitting of Keplerian orbits. We present the custom orbit-fitting pipeline used to create this catalog, which includes novel quality metrics that account for the phase and velocity coverage of a fitted Keplerian orbit. With a typical RV precision of $\sim100-200$ m s$^{-1}$, APOGEE can probe systems with small separation companions down to a few Jupiter masses. Read More

We present a detailed chemical abundance analysis of 15 elements in the planet-hosting wide binary system HD80606 + HD80607 using Keck/HIRES spectra. As in our previous analysis of the planet-hosting wide binary HD20782 + HD20781, we presume that these two G5 dwarf stars formed together and therefore had identical primordial abundances. In this binary, HD80606 hosts an eccentric ($e\approx0. Read More

We present photometric observations of RW Aurigae, a Classical T Tauri system, that reveal two remarkable dimming events. These events are similar to that which we observed in 2010-2011, which was the first such deep dimming observed in RW Aur in a century's worth of photometric monitoring. We suggested the 2010-2011 dimming was the result of an occultation of the star by its tidally disrupted circumstellar disk. Read More

In Bastien et al. (2013) we found that high quality light curves, such as those obtained by Kepler, may be used to measure stellar surface gravity via granulation-driven light curve "flicker". Here, we update and extend the relation originally presented in Bastien et al. Read More

We report the discovery of a new Kepler transiting circumbinary planet (CBP). This latest addition to the still-small family of CBPs defies the current trend of known short-period planets orbiting near the stability limit of binary stars. Unlike the previous discoveries, the planet revolving around the eclipsing binary system Kepler-1647 has a very long orbital period (~1100 days) and was at conjunction only twice during the Kepler mission lifetime. Read More

Using time-series photometry from the Kilodegree Extremely Little Telescope (KELT) exoplanet survey, we are looking for eclipses of stars by their protoplanetary disks, specifically in young stellar associations. To date, we have discovered two previously unknown, large dimming events around the young stars RW Aurigae and V409 Tau. We attribute the dimming of RW Aurigae to an occultation by its tidally disrupted disk, with the disruption perhaps resulting from a recent flyby of its binary companion. Read More

The Large Synoptic Survey Telescope (LSST) will be the largest time-domain photometric survey ever. In order to maximize the LSST science yield for a broad array of transient stellar phenomena, it is necessary to optimize the survey cadence, coverage, and depth via quantitative metrics that are specifically designed to characterize the time-domain behavior of various types of stellar transients. In this paper we present three such metrics built on the LSST Metric Analysis Framework (MAF) model (Jones et al. Read More

AA Tau is a well studied young stellar object that presents many of the photometric characteristics of a Classical T Tauri star (CTTS), including short-timescale stochastic variability attributed to spots and/or accretion as well as long duration dimming events attributed to occultations by vertical features (e.g., warps) in its circumstellar disk. Read More

We present the target selection process for the Multi-object APO Radial Velocity Exoplanets Large-area Survey (MARVELS), which is part of the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) III. MARVELS is a medium-resolution ($R \sim 11000$) multi-fiber spectrograph capable of obtaining radial velocities for 60 objects at a time in order to find brown dwarfs and giant planets. The survey was configured to target dwarf stars with effective temperatures approximately between $4500$ and $6250 \, \mbox{K}$. Read More

The original {\it Kepler} mission observed and characterized over 2400 eclipsing binaries in addition to its prolific exoplanet detections. Despite the mechanical malfunction and subsequent non-recovery of two reaction wheels used to stabilize the instrument, the {\it Kepler} satellite continues collecting data in its repurposed {\it K2} mission surveying a series of fields along the ecliptic plane. Here we present an analysis of the first full baseline {\it K2} data release: the Campaign 0 data-set. Read More

The Large Synoptic Survey Telescope (LSST) will photometrically monitor approximately 1 billion stars for ten years. The resulting light curves can be used to detect transiting exoplanets. In particular, as demonstrated by Lund et al. Read More

The Kepler mission has yielded a large number of planet candidates from among the Kepler Objects of Interest (KOIs), but spectroscopic follow-up of these relatively faint stars is a serious bottleneck in confirming and characterizing these systems. We present motivation and survey design for an ongoing project with the SDSS-III multiplexed APOGEE near-infrared spectrograph to monitor hundreds of KOI host stars. We report some of our first results using representative targets from our sample, which include current planet candidates that we find to be false positives, as well as candidates listed as false positives that we do not find to be spectroscopic binaries. Read More

2015Jan
Authors: Shadab Alam1, Franco D. Albareti2, Carlos Allende Prieto3, F. Anders4, Scott F. Anderson5, Brett H. Andrews6, Eric Armengaud7, Éric Aubourg8, Stephen Bailey9, Julian E. Bautista10, Rachael L. Beaton11, Timothy C. Beers12, Chad F. Bender13, Andreas A. Berlind14, Florian Beutler15, Vaishali Bhardwaj16, Jonathan C. Bird17, Dmitry Bizyaev18, Cullen H. Blake19, Michael R. Blanton20, Michael Blomqvist21, John J. Bochanski22, Adam S. Bolton23, Jo Bovy24, A. Shelden Bradley25, W. N. Brandt26, D. E. Brauer27, J. Brinkmann28, Peter J. Brown29, Joel R. Brownstein30, Angela Burden31, Etienne Burtin32, Nicolás G. Busca33, Zheng Cai34, Diego Capozzi35, Aurelio Carnero Rosell36, Ricardo Carrera37, Yen-Chi Chen38, Cristina Chiappini39, S. Drew Chojnowski40, Chia-Hsun Chuang41, Nicolas Clerc42, Johan Comparat43, Kevin Covey44, Rupert A. C. Croft45, Antonio J. Cuesta46, Katia Cunha47, Luiz N. da Costa48, Nicola Da Rio49, James R. A. Davenport50, Kyle S. Dawson51, Nathan De Lee52, Timothée Delubac53, Rohit Deshpande54, Letícia Dutra-Ferreira55, Tom Dwelly56, Anne Ealet57, Garrett L. Ebelke58, Edward M. Edmondson59, Daniel J. Eisenstein60, Stephanie Escoffier61, Massimiliano Esposito62, Xiaohui Fan63, Emma Fernández-Alvar64, Diane Feuillet65, Nurten Filiz Ak66, Hayley Finley67, Alexis Finoguenov68, Kevin Flaherty69, Scott W. Fleming70, Andreu Font-Ribera71, Jonathan Foster72, Peter M. Frinchaboy73, J. G. Galbraith-Frew74, D. A. García-Hernández75, Ana E. García Pérez76, Patrick Gaulme77, Jian Ge78, R. Génova-Santos79, Luan Ghezzi80, Bruce A. Gillespie81, Léo Girardi82, Daniel Goddard83, Satya Gontcho A Gontcho84, Jonay I. González Hernández85, Eva K. Grebel86, Jan Niklas Grieb87, Nolan Grieves88, James E. Gunn89, Hong Guo90, Paul Harding91, Sten Hasselquist92, Suzanne L. Hawley93, Michael Hayden94, Fred R. Hearty95, Shirley Ho96, David W. Hogg97, Kelly Holley-Bockelmann98, Jon A. Holtzman99, Klaus Honscheid100, Joseph Huehnerhoff101, Linhua Jiang102, Jennifer A. Johnson103, Karen Kinemuchi104, David Kirkby105, Francisco Kitaura106, Mark A. Klaene107, Jean-Paul Kneib108, Xavier P. Koenig109, Charles R. Lam110, Ting-Wen Lan111, Dustin Lang112, Pierre Laurent113, Jean-Marc Le Goff114, Alexie Leauthaud115, Khee-Gan Lee116, Young Sun Lee117, Timothy C. Licquia118, Jian Liu119, Daniel C. Long120, Martín López-Corredoira121, Diego Lorenzo-Oliveira122, Sara Lucatello123, Britt Lundgren124, Robert H. Lupton125, Claude E. Mack III126, Suvrath Mahadevan127, Marcio A. G. Maia128, Steven R. Majewski129, Elena Malanushenko130, Viktor Malanushenko131, A. Manchado132, Marc Manera133, Qingqing Mao134, Claudia Maraston135, Robert C. Marchwinski136, Daniel Margala137, Sarah L. Martell138, Marie Martig139, Karen L. Masters140, Cameron K. McBride141, Peregrine M. McGehee142, Ian D. McGreer143, Richard G. McMahon144, Brice Ménard145, Marie-Luise Menzel146, Andrea Merloni147, Szabolcs Mészáros148, Adam A. Miller149, Jordi Miralda-Escudé150, Hironao Miyatake151, Antonio D. Montero-Dorta152, Surhud More153, Xan Morice-Atkinson154, Heather L. Morrison155, Demitri Muna156, Adam D. Myers157, Jeffrey A. Newman158, Mark Neyrinck159, Duy Cuong Nguyen160, Robert C. Nichol161, David L. Nidever162, Pasquier Noterdaeme163, Sebastián E. Nuza164, Julia E. O'Connell165, Robert W. O'Connell166, Ross O'Connell167, Ricardo L. C. Ogando168, Matthew D. Olmstead169, Audrey E. Oravetz170, Daniel J. Oravetz171, Keisuke Osumi172, Russell Owen173, Deborah L. Padgett174, Nikhil Padmanabhan175, Martin Paegert176, Nathalie Palanque-Delabrouille177, Kaike Pan178, John K. Parejko179, Changbom Park180, Isabelle Pâris181, Petchara Pattarakijwanich182, M. Pellejero-Ibanez183, Joshua Pepper184, Will J. Percival185, Ismael Pérez-Fournon186, Ignasi Pérez-Ràfols187, Patrick Petitjean188, Matthew M. Pieri189, Marc H. Pinsonneault190, Gustavo F. Porto de Mello191, Francisco Prada192, Abhishek Prakash193, Adrian M. Price-Whelan194, M. Jordan Raddick195, Mubdi Rahman196, Beth A. Reid197, James Rich198, Hans-Walter Rix199, Annie C. Robin200, Constance M. Rockosi201, Thaíse S. Rodrigues202, Sergio Rodríguez-Rottes203, Natalie A. Roe204, Ashley J. Ross205, Nicholas P. Ross206, Graziano Rossi207, John J. Ruan208, J. A. Rubiño-Martín209, Eli S. Rykoff210, Salvador Salazar-Albornoz211, Mara Salvato212, Lado Samushia213, Ariel G. Sánchez214, Basílio Santiago215, Conor Sayres216, Ricardo P. Schiavon217, David J. Schlegel218, Sarah J. Schmidt219, Donald P. Schneider220, Mathias Schultheis221, Axel D. Schwope222, C. G. Scóccola223, Kris Sellgren224, Hee-Jong Seo225, Neville Shane226, Yue Shen227, Matthew Shetrone228, Yiping Shu229, Thirupathi Sivarani230, M. F. Skrutskie231, Anže Slosar232, Verne V. Smith233, Flávia Sobreira234, Keivan G. Stassun235, Matthias Steinmetz236, Michael A. Strauss237, Alina Streblyanska238, Molly E. C. Swanson239, Jonathan C. Tan240, Jamie Tayar241, Ryan C. Terrien242, Aniruddha R. Thakar243, Daniel Thomas244, Benjamin A. Thompson245, Jeremy L. Tinker246, Rita Tojeiro247, Nicholas W. Troup248, Mariana Vargas-Magaña249, Jose A. Vazquez250, Licia Verde251, Matteo Viel252, Nicole P. Vogt253, David A. Wake254, Ji Wang255, Benjamin A. Weaver256, David H. Weinberg257, Benjamin J. Weiner258, Martin White259, John C. Wilson260, John P. Wisniewski261, W. M. Wood-Vasey262, Christophe Yèche263, Donald G. York264, Nadia L. Zakamska265, O. Zamora266, Gail Zasowski267, Idit Zehavi268, Gong-Bo Zhao269, Zheng Zheng270, Xu Zhou271, Zhimin Zhou272, Guangtun Zhu273, Hu Zou274
Affiliations: 1Bruce and Astrid McWilliams Center for Cosmology, Department of Physics, Carnegie Mellon University, 5000 Forbes Ave, Pittsburgh, PA 15213, USA, 2Instituto de Física Teórica, 3Instituto de Astrofísica de Canarias, 4Leibniz-Institut für Astrophysik Potsdam, 5Department of Astronomy, University of Washington, Box 351580, Seattle, WA 98195, USA, 6Department of Astronomy, Ohio State University, 140 West 18th Avenue, Columbus, OH 43210, USA, 7CEA, Centre de Saclay, Irfu/SPP, F-91191 Gif-sur-Yvette, France, 8APC, University of Paris Diderot, CNRS/IN2P3, CEA/IRFU, Observatoire de Paris, Sorbonne Paris Cité, F-75205 Paris, France, 9Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, One Cyclotron Road, Berkeley, CA 94720, USA, 10APC, University of Paris Diderot, CNRS/IN2P3, CEA/IRFU, Observatoire de Paris, Sorbonne Paris Cité, F-75205 Paris, France, 11Department of Astronomy, University of Virginia, P.O. Box 400325, Charlottesville, VA 22904-4325, USA, 12Department of Physics and JINA Center for the Evolution of the Elements, University of Notre Dame, Notre Dame, IN 46556 USA, 13Department of Astronomy and Astrophysics, 525 Davey Laboratory, The Pennsylvania State University, University Park, PA 16802, USA, 14Department of Physics and Astronomy, Vanderbilt University, VU Station 1807, Nashville, TN 37235, USA, 15Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, One Cyclotron Road, Berkeley, CA 94720, USA, 16Department of Astronomy, University of Washington, Box 351580, Seattle, WA 98195, USA, 17Department of Physics and Astronomy, Vanderbilt University, VU Station 1807, Nashville, TN 37235, USA, 18Apache Point Observatory, P.O. Box 59, Sunspot, NM 88349, USA, 19University of Pennsylvania, Department of Physics and Astronomy, 219 S. 33rd St., Philadelphia, PA 19104, USA, 20Center for Cosmology and Particle Physics, Department of Physics, New York University, 4 Washington Place, New York, NY 10003, USA, 21Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of California, Irvine, CA 92697, USA, 22Department of Astronomy, University of Washington, Box 351580, Seattle, WA 98195, USA, 23Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Utah, Salt Lake City, UT 84112, USA, 24Institute for Advanced Study, Einstein Drive, Princeton, NJ 08540, USA, 25Apache Point Observatory, P.O. Box 59, Sunspot, NM 88349, USA, 26Department of Astronomy and Astrophysics, 525 Davey Laboratory, The Pennsylvania State University, University Park, PA 16802, USA, 27Leibniz-Institut für Astrophysik Potsdam, 28Apache Point Observatory, P.O. Box 59, Sunspot, NM 88349, USA, 29George P. and Cynthia Woods Mitchell Institute for Fundamental Physics and Astronomy, Texas A. and M. University, Department of Physics and Astronomy, 4242 TAMU, College Station, TX 77843, USA, 30Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Utah, Salt Lake City, UT 84112, USA, 31Institute of Cosmology and Gravitation, Dennis Sciama Building, University of Portsmouth, Portsmouth, PO1 3FX, UK, 32CEA, Centre de Saclay, Irfu/SPP, F-91191 Gif-sur-Yvette, France, 33Observatório Nacional, Rua Gal. José Cristino 77, Rio de Janeiro, RJ - 20921-400, Brazil, 34Steward Observatory, 933 North Cherry Avenue, Tucson, AZ 85721, USA, 35Institute of Cosmology and Gravitation, Dennis Sciama Building, University of Portsmouth, Portsmouth, PO1 3FX, UK, 36Observatório Nacional, Rua Gal. José Cristino 77, Rio de Janeiro, RJ - 20921-400, Brazil, 37Instituto de Astrofísica de Canarias, 38Department of Statistics, Bruce and Astrid McWilliams Center for Cosmology, Carnegie Mellon University, 5000 Forbes Ave, Pittsburgh, PA 15213, USA, 39Leibniz-Institut für Astrophysik Potsdam, 40Department of Astronomy, MSC 4500, New Mexico State University, P.O. Box 30001, Las Cruces, NM 88003, USA, 41Instituto de Física Teórica, 42Max-Planck-Institut für Extraterrestrische Physik, Postfach 1312, Giessenbachstr. D-85741 Garching, Germany, 43Instituto de Física Teórica, 44Lowell Observatory, 1400 W. Mars Hill Road, Flagstaff AZ 86001, 45Bruce and Astrid McWilliams Center for Cosmology, Department of Physics, Carnegie Mellon University, 5000 Forbes Ave, Pittsburgh, PA 15213, USA, 46Institut de Ciències del Cosmos, Universitat de Barcelona/IEEC, Barcelona E-08028, Spain, 47Observatório Nacional, Rua Gal. José Cristino 77, Rio de Janeiro, RJ - 20921-400, Brazil, 48Observatório Nacional, Rua Gal. José Cristino 77, Rio de Janeiro, RJ - 20921-400, Brazil, 49Department of Astronomy, University of Florida, Bryant Space Science Center, Gainesville, FL 32611-2055, USA, 50Department of Astronomy, University of Washington, Box 351580, Seattle, WA 98195, USA, 51Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Utah, Salt Lake City, UT 84112, USA, 52Department of Physics and Geology, Northern Kentucky University, Highland Heights, KY 41099, USA, 53Laboratoire d'Astrophysique, École Polytechnique Fédérale de Lausanne, 54Department of Astronomy and Astrophysics, 525 Davey Laboratory, The Pennsylvania State University, University Park, PA 16802, USA, 55Universidade Federal do Rio de Janeiro, Observatório do Valongo, Ladeira do Pedro Antônio 43, 20080-090 Rio de Janeiro, Brazil, 56Max-Planck-Institut für Extraterrestrische Physik, Postfach 1312, Giessenbachstr. D-85741 Garching, Germany, 57Centre de Physique des Particules de Marseille, Aix-Marseille Université, CNRS/IN2P3, E-13288 Marseille, France, 58Department of Astronomy, University of Virginia, P.O. Box 400325, Charlottesville, VA 22904-4325, USA, 59Institute of Cosmology and Gravitation, Dennis Sciama Building, University of Portsmouth, Portsmouth, PO1 3FX, UK, 60Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics, 60 Garden Street, Cambridge MA 02138, USA, 61Centre de Physique des Particules de Marseille, Aix-Marseille Université, CNRS/IN2P3, E-13288 Marseille, France, 62Instituto de Astrofísica de Canarias, 63Steward Observatory, 933 North Cherry Avenue, Tucson, AZ 85721, USA, 64Instituto de Astrofísica de Canarias, 65Department of Astronomy, MSC 4500, New Mexico State University, P.O. Box 30001, Las Cruces, NM 88003, USA, 66Department of Astronomy and Astrophysics, 525 Davey Laboratory, The Pennsylvania State University, University Park, PA 16802, USA, 67Institut d'Astrophysique de Paris, UPMC-CNRS, UMR7095, 98 bis Boulevard Arago, F-75014, Paris, France, 68Department of Physics, University of Helsinki, Gustaf Hällströmin katu 2, Helsinki FI-00140, Finland, 69Department of Astronomy, Van Vleck Observatory, Wesleyan University, Middletown, CT 06459, 70Space Telescope Science Institute, 3700 San Martin Dr, Baltimore, MD 21218, USA, 71Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, One Cyclotron Road, Berkeley, CA 94720, USA, 72Yale Center for Astronomy and Astrophysics, Yale University, New Haven, CT, 06520, USA, 73Department of Physics and Astronomy, Texas Christian University, 2800 South University Drive, Fort Worth, TX 76129, USA, 74Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Utah, Salt Lake City, UT 84112, USA, 75Instituto de Astrofísica de Canarias, 76Department of Astronomy, University of Virginia, P.O. Box 400325, Charlottesville, VA 22904-4325, USA, 77Apache Point Observatory, P.O. Box 59, Sunspot, NM 88349, USA, 78Department of Astronomy, University of Florida, Bryant Space Science Center, Gainesville, FL 32611-2055, USA, 79Instituto de Astrofísica de Canarias, 80Observatório Nacional, Rua Gal. José Cristino 77, Rio de Janeiro, RJ - 20921-400, Brazil, 81Center for Astrophysical Sciences, Department of Physics and Astronomy, Johns Hopkins University, 3400 North Charles Street, Baltimore, MD 21218, USA, 82INAF, Osservatorio Astronomico di Padova, Vicolo dell'Osservatorio 5, I-35122 Padova, Italy, 83Institute of Cosmology and Gravitation, Dennis Sciama Building, University of Portsmouth, Portsmouth, PO1 3FX, UK, 84Institut de Ciències del Cosmos, Universitat de Barcelona/IEEC, Barcelona E-08028, Spain, 85Instituto de Astrofísica de Canarias, 86Astronomisches Rechen-Institut, Zentrum für Astronomie der Universität Heidelberg, Mönchhofstr. 12--14, D-69120 Heidelberg, Germany, 87Max-Planck-Institut für Extraterrestrische Physik, Postfach 1312, Giessenbachstr. D-85741 Garching, Germany, 88Department of Astronomy, University of Florida, Bryant Space Science Center, Gainesville, FL 32611-2055, USA, 89Department of Astrophysical Sciences, Princeton University, Princeton, NJ 08544, USA, 90Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Utah, Salt Lake City, UT 84112, USA, 91Department of Astronomy, Case Western Reserve University, Cleveland, OH 44106, USA, 92Department of Astronomy, MSC 4500, New Mexico State University, P.O. Box 30001, Las Cruces, NM 88003, USA, 93Department of Astronomy, University of Washington, Box 351580, Seattle, WA 98195, USA, 94Department of Astronomy, MSC 4500, New Mexico State University, P.O. Box 30001, Las Cruces, NM 88003, USA, 95Department of Astronomy and Astrophysics, 525 Davey Laboratory, The Pennsylvania State University, University Park, PA 16802, USA, 96Bruce and Astrid McWilliams Center for Cosmology, Department of Physics, Carnegie Mellon University, 5000 Forbes Ave, Pittsburgh, PA 15213, USA, 97Center for Cosmology and Particle Physics, Department of Physics, New York University, 4 Washington Place, New York, NY 10003, USA, 98Department of Physics and Astronomy, Vanderbilt University, VU Station 1807, Nashville, TN 37235, USA, 99Department of Astronomy, MSC 4500, New Mexico State University, P.O. Box 30001, Las Cruces, NM 88003, USA, 100Department of Physics, Ohio State University, Columbus, OH 43210, USA, 101Apache Point Observatory, P.O. Box 59, Sunspot, NM 88349, USA, 102Kavli Institute for Astronomy and Astrophysics, Peking University, Beijing 100871, China, 103Department of Astronomy, Ohio State University, 140 West 18th Avenue, Columbus, OH 43210, USA, 104Apache Point Observatory, P.O. Box 59, Sunspot, NM 88349, USA, 105Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of California, Irvine, CA 92697, USA, 106Leibniz-Institut für Astrophysik Potsdam, 107Apache Point Observatory, P.O. Box 59, Sunspot, NM 88349, USA, 108Laboratoire d'Astrophysique, École Polytechnique Fédérale de Lausanne, 109Department of Astronomy, Yale University, P.O. Box 208101, New Haven, CT 06520-8101, USA, 110Department of Astronomy, University of Virginia, P.O. 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Box 59, Sunspot, NM 88349, USA, 132Instituto de Astrofísica de Canarias, 133Institute of Cosmology and Gravitation, Dennis Sciama Building, University of Portsmouth, Portsmouth, PO1 3FX, UK, 134Department of Physics and Astronomy, Vanderbilt University, VU Station 1807, Nashville, TN 37235, USA, 135Institute of Cosmology and Gravitation, Dennis Sciama Building, University of Portsmouth, Portsmouth, PO1 3FX, UK, 136Department of Astronomy and Astrophysics, 525 Davey Laboratory, The Pennsylvania State University, University Park, PA 16802, USA, 137Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of California, Irvine, CA 92697, USA, 138School of Physics, University of New South Wales, Sydney, NSW 2052, Australia, 139Max-Planck-Institut für Astronomie, Königstuhl 17, D-69117 Heidelberg, Germany, 140Institute of Cosmology and Gravitation, Dennis Sciama Building, University of Portsmouth, Portsmouth, PO1 3FX, UK, 141Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics, 60 Garden Street, Cambridge MA 02138, USA, 142IPAC, MS 220-6, California Institute of Technology, Pasadena, CA 91125, USA, 143Steward Observatory, 933 North Cherry Avenue, Tucson, AZ 85721, USA, 144Institute of Astronomy, University of Cambridge, Madingley Road, Cambridge CB3 0HA, UK, 145Center for Astrophysical Sciences, Department of Physics and Astronomy, Johns Hopkins University, 3400 North Charles Street, Baltimore, MD 21218, USA, 146Max-Planck-Institut für Extraterrestrische Physik, Postfach 1312, Giessenbachstr. 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Box 59, Sunspot, NM 88349, USA, 172Bruce and Astrid McWilliams Center for Cosmology, Department of Physics, Carnegie Mellon University, 5000 Forbes Ave, Pittsburgh, PA 15213, USA, 173Department of Astronomy, University of Washington, Box 351580, Seattle, WA 98195, USA, 174NASA/GSFC, Code 665, Greenbelt, MC 20770, USA, 175Yale Center for Astronomy and Astrophysics, Yale University, New Haven, CT, 06520, USA, 176Department of Physics and Astronomy, Vanderbilt University, VU Station 1807, Nashville, TN 37235, USA, 177CEA, Centre de Saclay, Irfu/SPP, F-91191 Gif-sur-Yvette, France, 178Apache Point Observatory, P.O. Box 59, Sunspot, NM 88349, USA, 179Department of Physics, Yale University, 260 Whitney Ave, New Haven, CT, 06520, USA, 180School of Physics, Korea Institute for Advanced Study, 85 Hoegiro, Dongdaemun-gu, Seoul 130-722, Republic of Korea, 181INAF, Osservatorio Astronomico di Trieste, Via G. B. 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D-85741 Garching, Germany, 213Department of Physics, Kansas State University, 116 Cardwell Hall, Manhattan, KS 66506, USA, 214Max-Planck-Institut für Extraterrestrische Physik, Postfach 1312, Giessenbachstr. D-85741 Garching, Germany, 215Instituto de Física, UFRGS, Caixa Postal 15051, Porto Alegre, RS - 91501-970, Brazil, 216Department of Astronomy, University of Washington, Box 351580, Seattle, WA 98195, USA, 217Gemini Observatory, 670 N. 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The third generation of the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS-III) took data from 2008 to 2014 using the original SDSS wide-field imager, the original and an upgraded multi-object fiber-fed optical spectrograph, a new near-infrared high-resolution spectrograph, and a novel optical interferometer. All the data from SDSS-III are now made public. In particular, this paper describes Data Release 11 (DR11) including all data acquired through 2013 July, and Data Release 12 (DR12) adding data acquired through 2014 July (including all data included in previous data releases), marking the end of SDSS-III observing. Read More

2014Nov
Affiliations: 1Vanderbilt University, 2Stockholm University, 3Vanderbilt University, 4Lehigh University

We report observations of the bright M82 supernova 2014J serendipitously obtained with the Kilodegree Extremely Little Telescope (KELT). The SN was observed at high cadence for over 100 days, from pre-explosion, to early rise and peak times, through the secondary bump. The high cadence KELT data with high S/N is completely unique for SN 2014J and for any other SNIa, with the exception of the (yet) unpublished Kepler data. Read More

2014Oct
Affiliations: 1Vanderbilt University, 2Lehigh University, 3Vanderbilt University, 4Vanderbilt University, 5Northern Kentucky University, 6MIT

We introduce a catalog of stellar properties for stars observed by the Kepler follow-on mission, K2. We base the catalog on a cross-match between the K2 Campaign target lists and the current working version of the NASA TESS target catalog. The resulting K2-TESS Stellar Properties Catalog includes value-added information from the TESS Target Catalog, including stellar colors, proper motions, effective temperatures, an estimated luminosity class (dwarf/subgiant versus giant) for each star based on reduced-proper-motion, and many other properties via cross-matching to other all-sky catalogs. Read More

The remarkable scientific return and legacy of LSST, in the era that it will define, will not only be realized in the breakthrough science that will be achieved with catalog data. This Big Data survey will shape the way the entire astronomical community advances -- or fails to embrace -- new ways of approaching astronomical research and data. In this white paper, we address the NRC template questions 4,5,6,8 and 9, with a focus on the unique challenges for smaller, and often under-resourced, institutions, including institutions dedicated to underserved minority populations, in the efficient and effective use of LSST data products to maximize LSST's scientific return. Read More

The Large Synoptic Survey Telescope (LSST) has been designed in order to satisfy several different scientific objectives that can be addressed by a ten-year synoptic sky survey. However, LSST will also provide a large amount of data that can then be exploited for additional science beyond its primary goals. We demonstrate the potential of using LSST data to search for transiting exoplanets, and in particular to find planets orbiting host stars that are members of stellar populations that have been less thoroughly probed by current exoplanet surveys. Read More

Studies of Galactic chemical and dynamical evolution in the solar neighborhood depend on the availability of precise atmospheric parameters (Teff, [Fe/H] and log g) for solar-type stars. Many large-scale spectroscopic surveys operate at low to moderate spectral resolution for efficiency in observing large samples, which makes the stellar characterization difficult due to the high degree of blending of spectral features. While most surveys use spectral synthesis, in this work we employ an alternative method based on spectral indices to determine the atmospheric parameters of a sample of nearby FGK dwarfs and subgiants observed by the MARVELS survey at moderate resolving power (R~12,000). Read More

Most extrasolar planets have been detected by their influence on their parent star, typically either gravitationally (the Doppler method) or by the small dip in brightness as the planet blocks a portion of the star (the transit method). Therefore, the accuracy with which we know the masses and radii of extrasolar planets depends directly on how well we know those of the stars, the latter usually determined from the measured stellar surface gravity, logg. Recent work has demonstrated that the short-timescale brightness variations ("flicker") of stars can be used to measure logg to a high accuracy of ~0. Read More

2014Apr

Using high-resolution echelle spectra obtained with Magellan/MIKE, we present a chemical abundance analysis of both stars in the planet-hosting wide binary system HD20782 + HD20781. Both stars are G dwarfs, and presumably coeval, forming in the same molecular cloud. Therefore we expect that they should possess the same bulk metallicities. Read More

We have used Sloan Digital Sky Survey-III (SDSS-III) Apache Point Observatory Galactic Evolution Experiment (APOGEE) radial velocity observations in the near-infrared $H$-band to explore the membership of the nearby ($86.7 \pm 0.9$ pc) open cluster Coma Berenices (Melotte 111), concentrating on the poorly-populated low-mass end of the main sequence. Read More

We present secondary eclipse observations of the highly irradiated transiting brown dwarf KELT-1b. These observations represent the first constraints on the atmospheric dynamics of a highly irradiated brown dwarf, and the atmospheres of irradiated giant planets at high surface gravity. Using the Spitzer Space Telescope, we measure secondary eclipse depths of 0. Read More

We compare stellar photometric variability, as measured from Kepler light curves by Basri et al. (2011), with measurements of radial velocity (RV) root-mean-square (RMS) variations of all California Planet Search overlap stars. We newly derive rotation periods from the Kepler light curves for all of the stars in our study sample. Read More

We show that the Kepler spacecraft in two-reaction wheel mode of operation is very well suited for the study of eclipsing binary star systems. Continued observations of the Kepler field will provide the most enduring and long-term valuable science. It will enable the discovery and characterization of eclipsing binaries with periods greater than 1 year - these are the most important, yet least understood binaries for habitable-zone planet background considerations. Read More

2013Aug
Affiliations: 1Vanderbilt University, 2Vanderbilt University, 3UC Berkeley, 4Lehigh University

Surface gravity is one of a star's basic properties, but it is difficult to measure accurately, with typical uncertainties of 25-50 per cent if measured spectroscopically and 90-150 per cent photometrically. Asteroseismology measures gravity with an uncertainty of about two per cent but is restricted to relatively small samples of bright stars, most of which are giants. The availability of high-precision measurements of brightness variations for >150,000 stars provides an opportunity to investigate whether the variations can be used to determine surface gravities. Read More

We report the discovery of KELT-6b, a mildly-inflated Saturn-mass planet transiting a metal-poor host. The initial transit signal was identified in KELT-North survey data, and the planetary nature of the occulter was established using a combination of follow-up photometry, high-resolution imaging, high-resolution spectroscopy, and precise radial velocity measurements. The fiducial model from a global analysis including constraints from isochrones indicates that the V=10. Read More