Jeff Donahue

Jeff Donahue
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Jeff Donahue
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Computer Science - Computer Vision and Pattern Recognition (16)
 
Computer Science - Learning (7)
 
Computer Science - Neural and Evolutionary Computing (3)
 
Computer Science - Artificial Intelligence (3)
 
Computer Science - Computation and Language (2)
 
Statistics - Machine Learning (2)
 
Computer Science - Graphics (1)

Publications Authored By Jeff Donahue

Over the past three years Pinterest has experimented with several visual search and recommendation services, including Related Pins (2014), Similar Looks (2015), Flashlight (2016) and Lens (2017). This paper presents an overview of our visual discovery engine powering these services, and shares the rationales behind our technical and product decisions such as the use of object detection and interactive user interfaces. We conclude that this visual discovery engine significantly improves engagement in both search and recommendation tasks. Read More

The ability of the Generative Adversarial Networks (GANs) framework to learn generative models mapping from simple latent distributions to arbitrarily complex data distributions has been demonstrated empirically, with compelling results showing that the latent space of such generators captures semantic variation in the data distribution. Intuitively, models trained to predict these semantic latent representations given data may serve as useful feature representations for auxiliary problems where semantics are relevant. However, in their existing form, GANs have no means of learning the inverse mapping -- projecting data back into the latent space. Read More

We present an unsupervised visual feature learning algorithm driven by context-based pixel prediction. By analogy with auto-encoders, we propose Context Encoders -- a convolutional neural network trained to generate the contents of an arbitrary image region conditioned on its surroundings. In order to succeed at this task, context encoders need to both understand the content of the entire image, as well as produce a plausible hypothesis for the missing part(s). Read More

Clearly explaining a rationale for a classification decision to an end-user can be as important as the decision itself. Existing approaches for deep visual recognition are generally opaque and do not output any justification text; contemporary vision-language models can describe image content but fail to take into account class-discriminative image aspects which justify visual predictions. We propose a new model that focuses on the discriminating properties of the visible object, jointly predicts a class label, and explains why the predicted label is appropriate for the image. Read More

Convolutional Neural Networks spread through computer vision like a wildfire, impacting almost all visual tasks imaginable. Despite this, few researchers dare to train their models from scratch. Most work builds on one of a handful of ImageNet pre-trained models, and fine-tunes or adapts these for specific tasks. Read More

We demonstrate that, with the availability of distributed computation platforms such as Amazon Web Services and open-source tools, it is possible for a small engineering team to build, launch and maintain a cost-effective, large-scale visual search system with widely available tools. We also demonstrate, through a comprehensive set of live experiments at Pinterest, that content recommendation powered by visual search improve user engagement. By sharing our implementation details and the experiences learned from launching a commercial visual search engines from scratch, we hope visual search are more widely incorporated into today's commercial applications. Read More

Real-world videos often have complex dynamics; and methods for generating open-domain video descriptions should be sensitive to temporal structure and allow both input (sequence of frames) and output (sequence of words) of variable length. To approach this problem, we propose a novel end-to-end sequence-to-sequence model to generate captions for videos. For this we exploit recurrent neural networks, specifically LSTMs, which have demonstrated state-of-the-art performance in image caption generation. Read More

Solving the visual symbol grounding problem has long been a goal of artificial intelligence. The field appears to be advancing closer to this goal with recent breakthroughs in deep learning for natural language grounding in static images. In this paper, we propose to translate videos directly to sentences using a unified deep neural network with both convolutional and recurrent structure. Read More

Models based on deep convolutional networks have dominated recent image interpretation tasks; we investigate whether models which are also recurrent, or "temporally deep", are effective for tasks involving sequences, visual and otherwise. We develop a novel recurrent convolutional architecture suitable for large-scale visual learning which is end-to-end trainable, and demonstrate the value of these models on benchmark video recognition tasks, image description and retrieval problems, and video narration challenges. In contrast to current models which assume a fixed spatio-temporal receptive field or simple temporal averaging for sequential processing, recurrent convolutional models are "doubly deep"' in that they can be compositional in spatial and temporal "layers". Read More

A major challenge in scaling object detection is the difficulty of obtaining labeled images for large numbers of categories. Recently, deep convolutional neural networks (CNNs) have emerged as clear winners on object classification benchmarks, in part due to training with 1.2M+ labeled classification images. Read More

Semantic part localization can facilitate fine-grained categorization by explicitly isolating subtle appearance differences associated with specific object parts. Methods for pose-normalized representations have been proposed, but generally presume bounding box annotations at test time due to the difficulty of object detection. We propose a model for fine-grained categorization that overcomes these limitations by leveraging deep convolutional features computed on bottom-up region proposals. Read More

Caffe provides multimedia scientists and practitioners with a clean and modifiable framework for state-of-the-art deep learning algorithms and a collection of reference models. The framework is a BSD-licensed C++ library with Python and MATLAB bindings for training and deploying general-purpose convolutional neural networks and other deep models efficiently on commodity architectures. Caffe fits industry and internet-scale media needs by CUDA GPU computation, processing over 40 million images a day on a single K40 or Titan GPU ($\approx$ 2. Read More

Dataset bias remains a significant barrier towards solving real world computer vision tasks. Though deep convolutional networks have proven to be a competitive approach for image classification, a question remains: have these models have solved the dataset bias problem? In general, training or fine-tuning a state-of-the-art deep model on a new domain requires a significant amount of data, which for many applications is simply not available. Transfer of models directly to new domains without adaptation has historically led to poor recognition performance. Read More

Object detection performance, as measured on the canonical PASCAL VOC dataset, has plateaued in the last few years. The best-performing methods are complex ensemble systems that typically combine multiple low-level image features with high-level context. In this paper, we propose a simple and scalable detection algorithm that improves mean average precision (mAP) by more than 30% relative to the previous best result on VOC 2012---achieving a mAP of 53. Read More

We evaluate whether features extracted from the activation of a deep convolutional network trained in a fully supervised fashion on a large, fixed set of object recognition tasks can be re-purposed to novel generic tasks. Our generic tasks may differ significantly from the originally trained tasks and there may be insufficient labeled or unlabeled data to conventionally train or adapt a deep architecture to the new tasks. We investigate and visualize the semantic clustering of deep convolutional features with respect to a variety of such tasks, including scene recognition, domain adaptation, and fine-grained recognition challenges. Read More

Images seen during test time are often not from the same distribution as images used for learning. This problem, known as domain shift, occurs when training classifiers from object-centric internet image databases and trying to apply them directly to scene understanding tasks. The consequence is often severe performance degradation and is one of the major barriers for the application of classifiers in real-world systems. Read More

We present an algorithm that learns representations which explicitly compensate for domain mismatch and which can be efficiently realized as linear classifiers. Specifically, we form a linear transformation that maps features from the target (test) domain to the source (training) domain as part of training the classifier. We optimize both the transformation and classifier parameters jointly, and introduce an efficient cost function based on misclassification loss. Read More