Jack Valmadre

Jack Valmadre
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Jack Valmadre
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Computer Science - Computer Vision and Pattern Recognition (6)
 
Computer Science - Learning (2)

Publications Authored By Jack Valmadre

The Correlation Filter is an algorithm that trains a linear template to discriminate between images and their translations. It is well suited to object tracking because its formulation in the Fourier domain provides a fast solution, enabling the detector to be re-trained once per frame. Previous works that use the Correlation Filter, however, have adopted features that were either manually designed or trained for a different task. Read More

The problem of arbitrary object tracking has traditionally been tackled by learning a model of the object's appearance exclusively online, using as sole training data the video itself. Despite the success of these methods, their online-only approach inherently limits the richness of the model they can learn. Recently, several attempts have been made to exploit the expressive power of deep convolutional networks. Read More

One-shot learning is usually tackled by using generative models or discriminative embeddings. Discriminative methods based on deep learning, which are very effective in other learning scenarios, are ill-suited for one-shot learning as they need large amounts of training data. In this paper, we propose a method to learn the parameters of a deep model in one shot. Read More

Correlation Filter-based trackers have recently achieved excellent performance, showing great robustness to challenging situations exhibiting motion blur and illumination changes. However, since the model that they learn depends strongly on the spatial layout of the tracked object, they are notoriously sensitive to deformation. Models based on colour statistics have complementary traits: they cope well with variation in shape, but suffer when illumination is not consistent throughout a sequence. Read More

Determining dense semantic correspondences across objects and scenes is a difficult problem that underpins many higher-level computer vision algorithms. Unlike canonical dense correspondence problems which consider images that are spatially or temporally adjacent, semantic correspondence is characterized by images that share similar high-level structures whose exact appearance and geometry may differ. Motivated by object recognition literature and recent work on rapidly estimating linear classifiers, we treat semantic correspondence as a constrained detection problem, where an exemplar LDA classifier is learned for each pixel. Read More

Computer vision is increasingly becoming interested in the rapid estimation of object detectors. Canonical hard negative mining strategies are slow as they require multiple passes of the large negative training set. Recent work has demonstrated that if the distribution of negative examples is assumed to be stationary, then Linear Discriminant Analysis (LDA) can learn comparable detectors without ever revisiting the negative set. Read More