J. M. Cordes - Cornell Uni

J. M. Cordes
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Name
J. M. Cordes
Affiliation
Cornell Uni
City
Irvine
Country
United States

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High Energy Astrophysical Phenomena (39)
 
Instrumentation and Methods for Astrophysics (24)
 
Astrophysics of Galaxies (9)
 
Solar and Stellar Astrophysics (7)
 
Cosmology and Nongalactic Astrophysics (5)
 
General Relativity and Quantum Cosmology (4)
 
Earth and Planetary Astrophysics (1)

Publications Authored By J. M. Cordes

Plasma lenses in the host galaxies of fast radio bursts (FRBs) can strongly modulate FRB amplitudes for a wide range of distances, including the $\sim $ Gpc distance of the repeater FRB121102. To produce caustics, the lens' dispersion-measure depth (${\rm DM}_{\ell}$), scale size ($a$), and distance from the source ($d_{\rm sl}$) must satisfy ${\rm DM}_{\ell} d_{\rm sl} / a^2 \gtrsim 0.65~ {\rm pc^2 \ AU^{-2} \ cm^{-3}}$. Read More

2017Mar
Affiliations: 1ALMA Time-domain Special Interest Group, 2ALMA Time-domain Special Interest Group, 3ALMA Time-domain Special Interest Group, 4ALMA Time-domain Special Interest Group, 5ALMA Time-domain Special Interest Group, 6ALMA Time-domain Special Interest Group, 7ALMA Time-domain Special Interest Group, 8ALMA Time-domain Special Interest Group, 9ALMA Time-domain Special Interest Group, 10ALMA Time-domain Special Interest Group, 11ALMA Time-domain Special Interest Group, 12ALMA Time-domain Special Interest Group, 13ALMA Time-domain Special Interest Group, 14ALMA Time-domain Special Interest Group, 15ALMA Time-domain Special Interest Group, 16ALMA Time-domain Special Interest Group, 17ALMA Time-domain Special Interest Group, 18ALMA Time-domain Special Interest Group, 19ALMA Time-domain Special Interest Group, 20ALMA Time-domain Special Interest Group, 21ALMA Time-domain Special Interest Group, 22ALMA Time-domain Special Interest Group, 23ALMA Time-domain Special Interest Group, 24ALMA Time-domain Special Interest Group, 25ALMA Time-domain Special Interest Group, 26ALMA Time-domain Special Interest Group, 27ALMA Time-domain Special Interest Group, 28ALMA Time-domain Special Interest Group, 29ALMA Time-domain Special Interest Group, 30ALMA Time-domain Special Interest Group, 31ALMA Time-domain Special Interest Group, 32ALMA Time-domain Special Interest Group, 33ALMA Time-domain Special Interest Group, 34ALMA Time-domain Special Interest Group, 35ALMA Time-domain Special Interest Group, 36ALMA Time-domain Special Interest Group, 37ALMA Time-domain Special Interest Group

While the Atacama Large Millimeter/submillimeter Array (ALMA) is a uniquely powerful telescope, its impact in certain fields of astrophysics has been limited by observatory policies rather than the telescope's innate technical capabilities. In particular, several observatory policies present challenges for observations of variable, mobile, and/or transient sources --- collectively referred to here as "time-domain" observations. In this whitepaper we identify some of these policies, describe the scientific applications they impair, and suggest changes that would increase ALMA's science impact in Cycle 6 and beyond. Read More

Fast radio bursts are astronomical radio flashes of unknown physical nature with durations of milliseconds. Their dispersive arrival times suggest an extragalactic origin and imply radio luminosities orders of magnitude larger than any other kind of known short-duration radio transient. Thus far, all FRBs have been detected with large single-dish telescopes with arcminute localizations, and attempts to identify their counterparts (source or host galaxy) have relied on contemporaneous variability of field sources or the presence of peculiar field stars or galaxies. Read More

2017Jan
Affiliations: 1JIVE, 2JIVE, 3ASTRON, 4JIVE, 5JIVE, 6Carleton College, 7ASTRON, 8Columbia U, 9ASIAA, 10NRAO Socorro, 11NRAO Socorro, 12JIVE, 13Cornell U, 14Cornell U, 15NRAO Socorro, 16U. of Manchester, 17NAIC Arecibo, 18McGill U, 19UC Berkeley, 20NASA JPL, 21U. of West Virginia Dept. of Physics and Astronomy, 22NRAO CV, 23NAIC Arecibo, 24DRAO, 25NAIC Arecibo, 26UC Berkeley, 27MPIfR, 28McGill U, 29Cornell U

The millisecond-duration radio flashes known as Fast Radio Bursts (FRBs) represent an enigmatic astrophysical phenomenon. Recently, the sub-arcsecond localization (~ 100mas precision) of FRB121102 using the VLA has led to its unambiguous association with persistent radio and optical counterparts, and to the identification of its host galaxy. However, an even more precise localization is needed in order to probe the direct physical relationship between the millisecond bursts themselves and the associated persistent emission. Read More

2017Jan
Affiliations: 1McGill U., 2ASTRON, 3Cornell U., 4ASIAA, 5UC Berkeley, 6Cornell U., 7ASTRON, 8Columbia U., 9NRAO, WVU, 10NRAO, 11NRAO, 12ASTRON, API, 13McGill U., 14JPL, 15ASTRON, 16JIVE, 17WVU, 18JIVE, 19NRAO, 20DRAO, 21Arecibo, 22MPIfR, 23JIVE, Leiden, 24Cornell U.

The precise localization of the repeating fast radio burst (FRB 121102) has provided the first unambiguous association (chance coincidence probability $p\lesssim3\times10^{-4}$) of an FRB with an optical and persistent radio counterpart. We report on optical imaging and spectroscopy of the counterpart and find that it is an extended ($0.6^{\prime\prime}-0. Read More

We analyze dispersion measure (DM) variations of 37 millisecond pulsars in the 9-year NANOGrav data release and constrain the sources of these variations. Variations are significant for nearly all pulsars, with characteristic timescales comparable to or even shorter than the average spacing between observations. Five pulsars have periodic annual variations, 14 pulsars have monotonically increasing or decreasing trends, and 13 pulsars show both effects. Read More

In pulsar timing, timing residuals are the differences between the observed times of arrival and the predictions from the timing model. A comprehensive timing model will produce featureless residuals, which are presumably composed of dominating noise and weak physical effects excluded from the timing model (e.g. Read More

Gravitational wave astronomy using a pulsar timing array requires high-quality millisecond pulsars, correctable interstellar propagation delays, and high-precision measurements of pulse times of arrival. Here we identify noise in timing residuals that exceeds that predicted for arrival time estimation for millisecond pulsars observed by the North American Nanohertz Observatory for Gravitational Waves. We characterize the excess noise using variance and structure function analyses. Read More

The Galactic center has some of the highest stellar densities in the Galaxy and a range of interstellar scattering properties that may aid in the detection of new radio-selected transient events. Here we describe a search for radio transients in the Galactic center using over 200 hours of archival data from the Very Large Array (VLA) at 5 and 8.4 GHz. Read More

To obtain the most accurate pulse arrival times from radio pulsars, it is necessary to correct or mitigate the effects of the propagation of radio waves through the warm and ionised interstellar medium. We examine both the strength of propagation effects associated with large-scale electron-density variations and the methodology used to estimate infinite-frequency arrival times. Using simulations of two-dimensional phase-varying screens, we assess the strength and non-stationarity of timing perturbations associated with large-scale density variations. Read More

We report the discovery and timing results for five millisecond pulsars (MSPs) from the Arecibo PALFA survey: PSRs J1906+0055, J1914+0659, J1933+1726, J1938+2516, and J1957+2516. Timing observations of the 5 pulsars were conducted with the Arecibo and Lovell telescopes for time spans ranging from 1.5 to 3. Read More

We report on the discovery and timing observations of 29 distant long-period pulsars discovered in the ongoing Arecibo PALFA pulsar survey. Following discovery with the Arecibo Telescope, confirmation and timing observations of these pulsars over several years at Jodrell Bank Observatory have yielded high-precision positions and measurements of rotation and radiation properties. We have used multi-frequency data to measure the interstellar scattering properties of some of these pulsars. Read More

We report the discovery of two long-term intermittent radio pulsars in the ongoing Arecibo PALFA pulsar survey. Following discovery with the Arecibo Telescope, extended observations of these pulsars over several years at Jodrell Bank Observatory have revealed the details of their rotation and radiation properties. PSRs J1910+0517 and J1929+1357 show long-term extreme bi-modal intermittency, switching between active (ON) and inactive (OFF) emission states and indicating the presence of a large, hitherto unrecognised, underlying population of such objects. Read More

We analyze plasma dispersion and scattering of fast radio bursts (FRBs) to identify the dominant locations of free electrons along their lines of sight and thus constrain the distances of the burst sources themselves. We establish the average $\tau$-DM relation for Galactic pulsars and use it as a benchmark for discussing FRB scattering. Though scattering times $\tau$ for FRBs are large in the majority of the 17 events we analyze, they are systematically smaller than those of Galactic pulsars that have similar dispersion measures (DMs). Read More

Model-independent distance constraints to binary millisecond pulsars (MSPs) are of great value to both the timing observations of the radio pulsars, and multiwavelength observations of their companion stars. Very Long Baseline Interferometry (VLBI) astrometry can be employed to provide these model-independent distances with very high precision via the detection of annual geometric parallax. Using the Very Long Baseline Array, we have observed two binary millisecond pulsars, PSR J1022+1001 and J2145-0750, over a two-year period and measured their distances to be 700 +14 -10 pc and 613 +16 -14 pc respectively. Read More

We report on radio and X-ray observations of the only known repeating Fast Radio Burst (FRB) source, FRB 121102. We have detected six additional radio bursts from this source: five with the Green Bank Telescope at 2 GHz, and one at 1.4 GHz at the Arecibo Observatory for a total of 17 bursts from this source. Read More

2016Mar
Affiliations: 1MPIfR, 2McGill U, 3ASTRON, 4Columbia U, 5Cornell U, 6Columbia U, 7Cornell U, 8Cornell U, 9Franklin and Marshall College, 10NRL, 11McGill U, 12MPIfR, 13McGill U, 14MPIfR, 15NRAO GB, 16McGill U, 17West Virginia U, 18McGill U, 19NRAO CV, 20NAIC Arecibo Observatory, 21U. British Columbia, 22U. Manchester, 23ASTRON, 24MPIfR

Fast Radio Bursts are millisecond-duration astronomical radio pulses of unknown physical origin that appear to come from extragalactic distances. Previous follow-up observations have failed to find additional bursts at the same dispersion measures (i.e. Read More

We analyse the stochastic properties of the 49 pulsars that comprise the first International Pulsar Timing Array (IPTA) data release. We use Bayesian methodology, performing model selection to determine the optimal description of the stochastic signals present in each pulsar. In addition to spin-noise and dispersion-measure (DM) variations, these models can include timing noise unique to a single observing system, or frequency band. Read More

The highly stable spin of neutron stars can be exploited for a variety of (astro-)physical investigations. In particular arrays of pulsars with rotational periods of the order of milliseconds can be used to detect correlated signals such as those caused by gravitational waves. Three such "Pulsar Timing Arrays" (PTAs) have been set up around the world over the past decades and collectively form the "International" PTA (IPTA). Read More

We report on an effort to extract and monitor interstellar scintillation parameters in regular timing observations collected for the NANOGrav pulsar timing array. Scattering delays are measured by creating dynamic spectra for each pulsar and observing epoch of wide-band observations centered near 1500 MHz and carried out at the Green Bank Telescope and the Arecibo Observatory. The ~800-MHz wide frequency bands imply dramatic changes in scintillation bandwidth across the bandpass, and a stretching routine has been included to account for this scaling. Read More

The use of pulsars as astrophysical clocks for gravitational wave experiments demands the highest possible timing precision. Pulse times of arrival (TOAs) are limited by stochastic processes that occur in the pulsar itself, along the line of sight through the interstellar medium, and in the measurement process. On timescales of seconds to hours, the TOA variance exceeds that from template-fitting errors due to additive noise. Read More

We analyze deterministic and random temporal variations in dispersion measure (DM) from the full three-dimensional velocities of pulsars with respect to the solar system, combined with electron-density variations on a wide range of length scales. Previous treatments have largely ignored the pulsar's changing distance while favoring interpretations involving the change in sky position from transverse motion. Linear trends in pulsar DMs seen over 5-10~year timescales may signify sizable DM gradients in the interstellar medium (ISM) sampled by the changing direction of the line of sight to the pulsar. Read More

We report here on key science topics for the Next Generation Very Large Array in the areas of time domain, fundamental physics, and cosmology. Key science cases considered are pulsars in orbit around the Galactic Center massive black hole, Sagittarius A*, electromagnetic counterparts to gravitational waves, and astrometric cosmology. These areas all have the potential for ground-breaking and transformative discovery. Read More

Dense, continuous pulsar timing observations over a 24-hr period provide a method for probing intermediate gravitational wave (GW) frequencies from 10 microhertz to 20 millihertz. The European Pulsar Timing Array (EPTA), the North American Nanohertz Observatory for Gravitational Waves (NANOGrav), the Parkes Pulsar Timing Array (PPTA), and the combined International Pulsar Timing Array (IPTA) all use millisecond pulsar observations to detect or constrain GWs typically at nanohertz frequencies. In the case of the IPTA's nine-telescope 24-Hour Global Campaign on millisecond pulsar J1713+0747, GW limits in the intermediate frequency regime can be produced. Read More

We compute upper limits on the nanohertz-frequency isotropic stochastic gravitational wave background (GWB) using the 9-year data release from the North American Nanohertz Observatory for Gravitational Waves (NANOGrav) collaboration. We set upper limits for a GWB from supermassive black hole binaries under power law, broken power law, and free spectral coefficient GW spectrum models. We place a 95\% upper limit on the strain amplitude (at a frequency of yr$^{-1}$) in the power law model of $A_{\rm gw} < 1. Read More

We present high-precision timing observations spanning up to nine years for 37 millisecond pulsars monitored with the Green Bank and Arecibo radio telescopes as part of the North American Nanohertz Observatory for Gravitational Waves (NANOGrav) project. We describe the observational and instrumental setups used to collect the data, and methodology applied for calculating pulse times of arrival; these include novel methods for measuring instrumental offsets and characterizing low signal-to-noise ratio timing results. The time of arrival data are fit to a physical timing model for each source, including terms that characterize time-variable dispersion measure and frequency-dependent pulse shape evolution. Read More

We analyze the frequency dependence of the dispersion measure (DM), the column density of free electrons to a pulsar, caused by multipath scattering from small scale electron-density fluctuations. The DM is slightly different along each propagation path and the transverse spread of paths varies greatly with frequency, yielding time-of-arrival (TOA) perturbations that scale differently than the inverse square of the frequency, the expected dependence for a cold, unmagnetized plasma. We quantify DM and TOA perturbations analytically for thin phase screens and extended media and verify the results with simulations of thin screens. Read More

Among efforts to detect gravitational radiation, pulsar timing arrays are uniquely poised to detect "memory" signatures, permanent perturbations in spacetime from highly energetic astrophysical events such as mergers of supermassive black hole binaries. The North American Nanohertz Observatory for Gravitational Waves (NANOGrav) observes dozens of the most stable millisecond pulsars using the Arecibo and Green Bank radio telescopes in an effort to study, among other things, gravitational wave memory. We herein present the results of a search for gravitational wave bursts with memory (BWMs) using the first five years of NANOGrav observations. Read More

We present the discovery of five millisecond pulsars (MSPs) from the PALFA Galactic plane survey using Arecibo. Four of these (PSRs J0557+1551, J1850+0244, J1902+0300, and J1943+2210) are binary pulsars whose companions are likely white dwarfs, and one (PSR J1905+0453) is isolated. Phase-coherent timing solutions, ranging from $\sim$1 to $\sim$3 years in length, and based on observations from the Jodrell Bank and Arecibo telescopes, provide precise determinations of spin, orbital, and astrometric parameters. Read More

We consider radio bursts that originate from extragalactic neutron stars (NSs) by addressing three questions about source distances. What are the physical limitations on coherent radiation at GHz frequencies? Do they permit detection at cosmological distances? How many bursts per NS are needed to produce the inferred burst rate $\sim 10^3$-$10^4 $sky$^{-1}$ day$^{-1}$? The burst rate is comparable to the NS formation rate in a Hubble volume, requiring only one per NS if they are bright enough. However, radiation physics causes us to favor a closer population. Read More

The discovery and timing of radio pulsars within the Galactic centre is a fundamental aspect of the SKA Science Case, responding to the topic of "Strong Field Tests of Gravity with Pulsars and Black Holes" (Kramer et al. 2004; Cordes et al. 2004). Read More

The magneto-ionic structures of the interstellar medium of the Milky Way and the intergalactic medium are still poorly understood, especially at distances larger than a few kiloparsecs from the Sun. The three-dimensional (3D) structure of the Galactic magnetic field and electron density distribution may be probed through observations of radio pulsars, primarily owing to their compact nature, high velocities, and highly-polarized short-duration radio pulses. Phase 1 of the SKA, i. Read More

The vast collecting area of the Square Kilometre Array (SKA), harnessed by sensitive receivers, flexible digital electronics and increased computational capacity, could permit the most sensitive and exhaustive search for technologically-produced radio emission from advanced extraterrestrial intelligence (SETI) ever performed. For example, SKA1-MID will be capable of detecting a source roughly analogous to terrestrial high-power radars (e.g. Read More

Free electrons in the interstellar medium cause frequency-dependent delays in pulse arrival times due to both scattering and dispersion. Multi-frequency measurements are used to estimate and remove dispersion delays. In this paper, we focus on the effect of any non-simultaneity of multi-frequency observations on dispersive delay estimation and removal. Read More

The radio millisecond pulsar J1713+0747 is regarded as one of the highest-precision clocks in the sky, and is regularly timed for the purpose of detecting gravitational waves. The International Pulsar Timing Array collaboration undertook a 24-hour global observation of PSR J1713+0747 in an effort to better quantify sources of timing noise in this pulsar, particularly on intermediate (1 - 24 hr) timescales. We observed the pulsar continuously over 24 hr with the Arecibo, Effelsberg, GMRT, Green Bank, LOFAR, Lovell, Nancay, Parkes, and WSRT radio telescopes. Read More

2014Jun
Authors: R. P. J. Tilanus, T. P. Krichbaum, J. A. Zensus, A. Baudry, M. Bremer, H. Falcke, G. Giovannini, R. Laing, H. J. van Langevelde, W. Vlemmings, Z. Abraham, J. Afonso, I. Agudo, A. Alberdi, J. Alcolea, D. Altamirano, S. Asadi, K. Assaf, P. Augusto, A-K. Baczko, M. Boeck, T. Boller, M. Bondi, F. Boone, G. Bourda, R. Brajsa, J. Brand, S. Britzen, V. Bujarrabal, S. Cales, C. Casadio, V. Casasola, P. Castangia, J. Cernicharo, P. Charlot, L. Chemin, Y. Clenet, F. Colomer, F. Combes, J. Cordes, M. Coriat, N. Cross, F. D'Ammando, D. Dallacasa, J-F. Desmurs, R. Eatough, A. Eckart, D. Eisenacher, S. Etoka, M. Felix, R. Fender, M. Ferreira, E. Freeland, S. Frey, C. Fromm, L. Fuhrmann, K. Gabanyi, R. Galvan-Madrid, M. Giroletti, C. Goddi, J. Gomez, E. Gourgoulhon, M. Gray, I. di Gregorio, R. Greimel, N. Grosso, J. Guirado, K. Hada, A. Hanslmeier, C. Henkel, F. Herpin, P. Hess, J. Hodgson, D. Horns, E. Humphreys, B. Hutawarakorn Kramer, V. Ilyushin, V. Impellizzeri, V. Ivanov, M. Julião, M. Kadler, E. Kerins, P. Klaassen, K. van 't Klooster, E. Kording, M. Kozlov, M. Kramer, A. Kreikenbohm, O. Kurtanidze, J. Lazio, A. Leite, M. Leitzinger, J. Lepine, S. Levshakov, R. Lico, M. Lindqvist, E. Liuzzo, A. Lobanov, P. Lucas, K. Mannheim, J. Marcaide, S. Markoff, I. Martí-Vidal, C. Martins, N. Masetti, M. Massardi, K. Menten, H. Messias, S. Migliari, A. Mignano, J. Miller-Jones, D. Minniti, P. Molaro, S. Molina, A. Monteiro, L. Moscadelli, C. Mueller, A. Müller, S. Muller, F. Niederhofer, P. Odert, H. Olofsson, M. Orienti, R. Paladino, F. Panessa, Z. Paragi, T. Paumard, P. Pedrosa, M. Pérez-Torres, G. Perrin, M. Perucho, D. Porquet, I. Prandoni, S. Ransom, D. Reimers, M. Rejkuba, L. Rezzolla, A. Richards, E. Ros, A. Roy, A. Rushton, T. Savolainen, R. Schulz, M. Silva, G. Sivakoff, R. Soria-Ruiz, R. Soria, M. Spaans, R. Spencer, B. Stappers, G. Surcis, A. Tarchi, M. Temmer, M. Thompson, J. Torrelles, J. Truestedt, V. Tudose, T. Venturi, J. Verbiest, J. Vieira, P. Vielzeuf, F. Vincent, N. Wex, K. Wiik, T. Wiklind, J. Wilms, E. Zackrisson, H. Zechlin

Very long baseline interferometry at millimetre/submillimetre wavelengths (mmVLBI) offers the highest achievable spatial resolution at any wavelength in astronomy. The anticipated inclusion of ALMA as a phased array into a global VLBI network will bring unprecedented sensitivity and a transformational leap in capabilities for mmVLBI. Building on years of pioneering efforts in the US and Europe the ongoing ALMA Phasing Project (APP), a US-led international collaboration with MPIfR-led European contributions, is expected to deliver a beamformer and VLBI capability to ALMA by the end of 2014 (APP: Fish et al. Read More

The Pulsar Arecibo L-band Feed Array (PALFA) Survey uses the ALFA 7-beam receiver to search both inner and outer Galactic sectors visible from Arecibo ($32^{\circ}\lesssim \ell \lesssim 77^{\circ}$ and $168^{\circ}\lesssim \ell \lesssim 214^{\circ}$) close to the Galactic plane ($|b|\lesssim5^{\circ}$) for pulsars. In this paper we detail a precursor survey of this region with PALFA, which observed a subset of the full region (slightly more restrictive in $\ell$ and $|b|\lesssim1^{\circ}$) and detected 45 pulsars. For both Galactic millisecond and normal pulsar populations, we compare the survey's detections with simulations to model these populations and, in particular, to estimate the number of observable pulsars in the Galaxy. Read More

Highly energetic astrophysical phenomena like supermassive black hole binary (SMBHB) mergers are predicted to emit prodigious amounts of gravitational waves (GWs). An anticipated component of the gravitational waveform known as "memory" is permanent and non-oscillatory. For SMBHB mergers, the memory is created primarily during the most violent moments of the inspiral immediately preceding the final plunge and ring-down when the strongest gravitational fields are at work and the non-linearities of general relativity are most pronounced. Read More

Recent work has exploited pulsar survey data to identify temporally isolated, millisecond-duration radio bursts with large dispersion measures (DMs). These bursts have been interpreted as arising from a population of extragalactic sources, in which case they would provide unprecedented opportunities for probing the intergalactic medium; they may also be linked to new source classes. Until now, however, all so-called fast radio bursts (FRBs) have been detected with the Parkes radio telescope and its 13-beam receiver, casting some concern about the astrophysical nature of these signals. Read More

The North American Nanohertz Observatory for Gravitational Waves (NANOGrav) project currently observes 43 pulsars using the Green Bank and Arecibo radio telescopes. In this work we use a subset of 17 pulsars timed for a span of roughly five years (2005--2010). We analyze these data using standard pulsar timing models, with the addition of time-variable dispersion measure and frequency-variable pulse shape terms. Read More

This whitepaper describes how the VLASS could be designed in a manner to allow the identification of candidate dual active galactic nuclei (AGN) at separations <7 kpc. Dual AGN represent a clear marker of two supermassive black holes within an ongoing merger. A dual AGN survey will provide a wealth of studies in structure growth and gravitational-wave science. Read More

We present temporal scattering measurements of single pulses and average profiles of PSR J1745--2900, a magnetar recently discovered only 3 arcsec away from Sagittarius A* (Sgr A*), from 1.2 - 18.95 GHz using the Effelsberg 100-m Radio Telescope, the Nan\c{c}ay Decimetric Radio Telescope, and the Jodrell Bank Lovell Telescope. Read More

We use Fermi Gamma-ray Space Telescope detections and upper limits on non-recycled pulsars obtained from the Large Area Telescope (LAT) to constrain how the gamma-ray luminosity L depends on the period P and the period derivative \dot{P}. We use a Bayesian analysis to calculate a best-fit luminosity law, or dependence of L on P and \dot{P}, including different methods for modeling the beaming factor. An outer gap (OG) magnetosphere geometry provides the best-fit model, which is L \propto P^{-a} \dot{P}^{b} where a=1. Read More

In this paper, we present a novel artificial intelligence (AI) program that identifies pulsars from recent surveys using image pattern recognition with deep neural nets---the PICS (Pulsar Image-based Classification System) AI. The AI mimics human experts and distinguishes pulsars from noise and interferences by looking for patterns from candidate. The information from each pulsar candidate is synthesized in four diagnostic plots, which consist of up to thousands pixel of image data. Read More

We have made extensive observations of 35 distant slow (non-recycled) pulsars discovered in the ongoing Arecibo PALFA pulsar survey. Timing observations of these pulsars over several years at Arecibo Observatory and Jodrell Bank Observatory have yielded high-precision positions and measurements of rotation properties. Despite being a relatively distant population, these pulsars have properties that mirror those of the previously known pulsar population. Read More