J. Kelsey - Laboratory for Nuclear Science, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, MA, USA and the Bates Research and Engineering Center, Middleton MA

J. Kelsey
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Name
J. Kelsey
Affiliation
Laboratory for Nuclear Science, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, MA, USA and the Bates Research and Engineering Center, Middleton MA
City
Middleton
Country
United States

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Pub Categories

 
Physics - Instrumentation and Detectors (15)
 
Nuclear Experiment (10)
 
High Energy Physics - Experiment (5)
 
Instrumentation and Methods for Astrophysics (2)
 
Physics - Accelerator Physics (1)
 
High Energy Physics - Phenomenology (1)

Publications Authored By J. Kelsey

The GlueX experiment was designed to search for and study the pattern of gluonic excitations in the meson spectrum produced through photoproduction reactions at a new tagged photon beam facility in Hall D at Jefferson Laboratory. The particle identification capabilities of the GlueX experiment will be enhanced by constructing a DIRC (Detection of Internally Reflected Cherenkov light) detector, utilizing components of the decommissioned BaBar DIRC. The DIRC will allow systematic studies of kaon final states that are essential for inferring the quark flavor content of both hybrid and conventional mesons. Read More

We describe the current status of the DarkLight experiment at Jefferson Laboratory. DarkLight is motivated by the possibility that a dark photon in the mass range 10 to 100 MeV/c$^2$ could couple the dark sector to the Standard Model. DarkLight will precisely measure electron proton scattering using the 100 MeV electron beam of intensity 5 mA at the Jefferson Laboratory energy recovering linac incident on a windowless gas target of molecular hydrogen. Read More

2014Nov
Authors: MOLLER Collaboration, J. Benesch, P. Brindza, R. D. Carlini, J-P. Chen, E. Chudakov, S. Covrig, M. M. Dalton, A. Deur, D. Gaskell, A. Gavalya, J. Gomez, D. W. Higinbotham, C. Keppel, D. Meekins, R. Michaels, B. Moffit, Y. Roblin, R. Suleiman, R. Wines, B. Wojtsekhowski, G. Cates, D. Crabb, D. Day, K. Gnanvo, D. Keller, N. Liyanage, V. V. Nelyubin, H. Nguyen, B. Norum, K. Paschke, V. Sulkosky, J. Zhang, X. Zheng, J. Birchall, P. Blunden, M. T. W. Gericke, W. R. Falk, L. Lee, J. Mammei, S. A. Page, W. T. H. van Oers, K. Dehmelt, A. Deshpande, N. Feege, T. K. Hemmick, K. S. Kumar, T. Kutz, R. Miskimen, M. J. Ramsey-Musolf, S. Riordan, N. Hirlinger Saylor, J. Bessuille, E. Ihloff, J. Kelsey, S. Kowalski, R. Silwal, G. De Cataldo, R. De Leo, D. Di Bari, L. Lagamba, E. NappiV. Bellini, F. Mammoliti, F. Noto, M. L. Sperduto, C. M. Sutera, P. Cole, T. A. Forest, M. Khandekar, D. McNulty, K. Aulenbacher, S. Baunack, F. Maas, V. Tioukine, R. Gilman, K. Myers, R. Ransome, A. Tadepalli, R. Beniniwattha, R. Holmes, P. Souder, D. S. Armstrong, T. D. Averett, W. Deconinck, W. Duvall, A. Lee, M. L. Pitt, J. A. Dunne, D. Dutta, L. El Fassi, F. De Persio, F. Meddi, G. M. Urciuoli, E. Cisbani, C. Fanelli, F. Garibaldi, K. Johnston, N. Simicevic, S. Wells, P. M. King, J. Roche, J. Arrington, P. E. Reimer, G. Franklin, B. Quinn, A. Ahmidouch, S. Danagoulian, O. Glamazdin, R. Pomatsalyuk, R. Mammei, J. W. Martin, T. Holmstrom, J. Erler, Yu. G. Kolomensky, J. Napolitano, K. A. Aniol, W. D. Ramsay, E. Korkmaz, D. T. Spayde, F. Benmokhtar, A. Del Dotto, R. Perrino, S. Barkanova, A. Aleksejevs, J. Singh

The physics case and an experimental overview of the MOLLER (Measurement Of a Lepton Lepton Electroweak Reaction) experiment at the 12 GeV upgraded Jefferson Lab are presented. A highlight of the Fundamental Symmetries subfield of the 2007 NSAC Long Range Plan was the SLAC E158 measurement of the parity-violating asymmetry $A_{PV}$ in polarized electron-electron (M{\o}ller) scattering. The proposed MOLLER experiment will improve on this result by a factor of five, yielding the most precise measurement of the weak mixing angle at low or high energy anticipated over the next decade. Read More

2014Sep
Authors: Qweak Collaboration, T. Allison, M. Anderson, D. Androic, D. S. Armstrong, A. Asaturyan, T. D. Averett, R. Averill, J. Balewski, J. Beaufait, R. S. Beminiwattha, J. Benesch, F. Benmokhtar, J. Bessuille, J. Birchall, E. Bonnell, J. Bowman, P. Brindza, D. B. Brown, R. D. Carlini, G. D. Cates, B. Cavness, G. Clark, J. C. Cornejo, S. Covrig Dusa, M. M. Dalton, C. A. Davis, D. C. Dean, W. Deconinck, J. Diefenbach, K. Dow, J. F. Dowd, J. A. Dunne, D. Dutta, W. S. Duvall, J. R. Echols, M. Elaasar, W. R. Falk, K. D. Finelli, J. M. Finn, D. Gaskell, M. T. W. Gericke, J. Grames, V. M. Gray, K. Grimm, F. Guo, J. Hansknecht, D. J. Harrison, E. Henderson, J. R. Hoskins, E. Ihloff, K. Johnston, D. Jones, M. Jones, R. Jones, M. Kargiantoulakis, J. Kelsey, N. Khan, P. M. King, E. Korkmaz, S. Kowalski, A. Kubera, J. Leacock, J. P. Leckey, A. R. Lee, J. H. Lee, L. Lee, Y. Liang, S. MacEwan, D. Mack, J. A. Magee, R. Mahurin, J. Mammei, J. W. Martin, A. McCreary, M. H. McDonald, M. J. McHugh, P. Medeiros, D. Meekins, J. Mei, R. Michaels, A. Micherdzinska, A. Mkrtchyan, H. Mkrtchyan, N. Morgan, J. Musson, K. E. Mesick, A. Narayan, L. Z. Ndukum, V. Nelyubin, Nuruzzaman, W. T. H. van Oers, A. K. Opper, S. A. Page, J. Pan, K. D. Paschke, S. K. Phillips, M. L. Pitt, M. Poelker, J. F. Rajotte, W. D. Ramsay, W. R. Roberts, J. Roche, P. W. Rose, B. Sawatzky, T. Seva, M. H. Shabestari, R. Silwal, N. Simicevic, G. R. Smith, S. Sobczynski, P. Solvignon, D. T. Spayde, B. Stokes, D. W. Storey, A. Subedi, R. Subedi, R. Suleiman, V. Tadevosyan, W. A. Tobias, V. Tvaskis, E. Urban, B. Waidyawansa, P. Wang, S. P. Wells, S. A. Wood, S. Yang, S. Zhamkochyan, R. B. Zielinski

The Jefferson Lab Q_weak experiment determined the weak charge of the proton by measuring the parity-violating elastic scattering asymmetry of longitudinally polarized electrons from an unpolarized liquid hydrogen target at small momentum transfer. A custom apparatus was designed for this experiment to meet the technical challenges presented by the smallest and most precise ${\vec{e}}$p asymmetry ever measured. Technical milestones were achieved at Jefferson Lab in target power, beam current, beam helicity reversal rate, polarimetry, detected rates, and control of helicity-correlated beam properties. Read More

Many current and future dark matter and neutrino detectors are designed to measure scintillation light with a large array of photomultiplier tubes (PMTs). The energy resolution and particle identification capabilities of these detectors depend in part on the ability to accurately identify individual photoelectrons in PMT waveforms despite large variability in pulse amplitudes and pulse pileup. We describe a Bayesian technique that can identify the times of individual photoelectrons in a sampled PMT waveform without deconvolution, even when pileup is present. Read More

The focal-plane detector system for the KArlsruhe TRItium Neutrino (KATRIN) experiment consists of a multi-pixel silicon p-i-n-diode array, custom readout electronics, two superconducting solenoid magnets, an ultra high-vacuum system, a high-vacuum system, calibration and monitoring devices, a scintillating veto, and a custom data-acquisition system. It is designed to detect the low-energy electrons selected by the KATRIN main spectrometer. We describe the system and summarize its performance after its final installation. Read More

We present the design of a detector used as a particle tracking device in the STAR experiment at the RHIC collider of Brookhaven National Laboratories. The "stave," 24 of which make up the completed detector, is a highly mechanically integrated design comprised of 6 custom silicon sensors mounted on a Kapton substrate. 4608 wire bonds connect these sensors to 36 analog front-end chips which are mounted on the same substrate. Read More

An internal hydrogen target system was developed for the OLYMPUS experiment at DESY, in Hamburg, Germany. The target consisted of a long, thin-walled, tubular cell within an aluminum scattering chamber. Hydrogen entered at the center of the cell and exited through the ends, where it was removed from the beamline by a multistage pumping system. Read More

The direct search for dark matter is entering a period of increased sensitivity to the hypothetical Weakly Interacting Massive Particle (WIMP). One such technology that is being examined is a scintillation only noble liquid experiment, MiniCLEAN. MiniCLEAN utilizes over 500 kg of liquid cryogen to detect nuclear recoils from WIMP dark matter and serves as a demonstration for a future detector of order 50 to 100 tonnes. Read More

This paper describes the design of the active muon veto subsystem for the MiniCLEAN dark matter direct detection experiment at SNOLAB in Sudbury, Ontario, Canada. The water-filled veto is instrumented with 48 PMTs which are read out by front end electronics to time multiplex 48 photomultiplier channels into 6 digitizer channels and provide an instantaneous hit sum across the subsystem (N-Hit) for the veto trigger. We describe the primary system components: the PMTs, the support structure, the front-end electronics, and the data acquisition system. Read More

The OLYMPUS experiment was designed to measure the ratio between the positron-proton and electron-proton elastic scattering cross sections, with the goal of determining the contribution of two-photon exchange to the elastic cross section. Two-photon exchange might resolve the discrepancy between measurements of the proton form factor ratio, $\mu_p G^p_E/G^p_M$, made using polarization techniques and those made in unpolarized experiments. OLYMPUS operated on the DORIS storage ring at DESY, alternating between 2. Read More

2013Jul
Affiliations: 1Laboratory for Nuclear Science, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, MA, USA and the Bates Research and Engineering Center, Middleton MA, 2Laboratory for Nuclear Science, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, MA, USA and the Bates Research and Engineering Center, Middleton MA, 3Laboratory for Nuclear Science, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, MA, USA and the Bates Research and Engineering Center, Middleton MA, 4Laboratory for Nuclear Science, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, MA, USA and the Bates Research and Engineering Center, Middleton MA, 5Laboratory for Nuclear Science, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, MA, USA and the Bates Research and Engineering Center, Middleton MA, 6Laboratory for Nuclear Science, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, MA, USA and the Bates Research and Engineering Center, Middleton MA, 7Laboratory for Nuclear Science, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, MA, USA and the Bates Research and Engineering Center, Middleton MA, 8Laboratory for Nuclear Science, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, MA, USA and the Bates Research and Engineering Center, Middleton MA, 9Laboratory for Nuclear Science, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, MA, USA and the Bates Research and Engineering Center, Middleton MA, 10Laboratory for Nuclear Science, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, MA, USA and the Bates Research and Engineering Center, Middleton MA, 11Laboratory for Nuclear Science, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, MA, USA and the Bates Research and Engineering Center, Middleton MA, 12Laboratory for Nuclear Science, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, MA, USA and the Bates Research and Engineering Center, Middleton MA, 13Laboratory for Nuclear Science, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, MA, USA and the Bates Research and Engineering Center, Middleton MA, 14Laboratory for Nuclear Science, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, MA, USA and the Bates Research and Engineering Center, Middleton MA, 15Laboratory for Nuclear Science, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, MA, USA and the Bates Research and Engineering Center, Middleton MA, 16Laboratory for Nuclear Science, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, MA, USA and the Bates Research and Engineering Center, Middleton MA, 17Laboratory for Nuclear Science, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, MA, USA and the Bates Research and Engineering Center, Middleton MA, 18Laboratory for Nuclear Science, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, MA, USA and the Bates Research and Engineering Center, Middleton MA, 19Laboratory for Nuclear Science, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, MA, USA and the Bates Research and Engineering Center, Middleton MA, 20Laboratory for Nuclear Science, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, MA, USA and the Bates Research and Engineering Center, Middleton MA, 21Laboratory for Nuclear Science, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, MA, USA and the Bates Research and Engineering Center, Middleton MA, 22Laboratory for Nuclear Science, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, MA, USA and the Bates Research and Engineering Center, Middleton MA, 23Laboratory for Nuclear Science, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, MA, USA and the Bates Research and Engineering Center, Middleton MA, 24Jefferson Lab, Newport News, VA USA, 25Jefferson Lab, Newport News, VA USA, 26Jefferson Lab, Newport News, VA USA, 27Jefferson Lab, Newport News, VA USA, 28Jefferson Lab, Newport News, VA USA, 29Jefferson Lab, Newport News, VA USA, 30Jefferson Lab, Newport News, VA USA, 31Jefferson Lab, Newport News, VA USA, 32Jefferson Lab, Newport News, VA USA, 33Jefferson Lab, Newport News, VA USA, 34Jefferson Lab, Newport News, VA USA, 35Jefferson Lab, Newport News, VA USA, 36Jefferson Lab, Newport News, VA USA, 37Jefferson Lab, Newport News, VA USA, 38Jefferson Lab, Newport News, VA USA, 39Jefferson Lab, Newport News, VA USA, 40Jefferson Lab, Newport News, VA USA, 41Jefferson Lab, Newport News, VA USA, 42Jefferson Lab, Newport News, VA USA, 43Jefferson Lab, Newport News, VA USA, 44Jefferson Lab, Newport News, VA USA, 45Jefferson Lab, Newport News, VA USA, 46Physics Dept. U.C. Berkeley, Berkeley, CA USA, 47Institute for Research in Electronics and Applied Physics, University of Maryland, College Park, MD USA, 48Institute for Research in Electronics and Applied Physics, University of Maryland, College Park, MD USA, 49Physics Department, Arizona State University, Tempe, 50Physics Department, Arizona State University, Tempe, 51Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos NM USA, 52Physics Dept., Hampton University, Hampton, VA and Jefferson Lab, Newport News, VA USA, 53Physics Dept., Hampton University, Hampton, VA and Jefferson Lab, Newport News, VA USA, 54Physics Dept., Hampton University, Hampton, VA and Jefferson Lab, Newport News, VA USA, 55Physics Dept., Catholic University of America, Washington, DC USA, 56Physics Dept., Catholic University of America, Washington, DC USA, 57Physics Dept., Catholic University of America, Washington, DC USA, 58Temple University, Philadelphia PA USA, 59Temple University, Philadelphia PA USA, 60Temple University, Philadelphia PA USA, 61Temple University, Philadelphia PA USA, 62Temple University, Philadelphia PA USA, 63University Bonn, Bonn Germany, 64University Bonn, Bonn Germany, 65University Bonn, Bonn Germany, 66Physikalisches Institut Justus-Liebig-Universitt Giessen, Giessen Germany, 67Physikalisches Institut Justus-Liebig-Universitt Giessen, Giessen Germany

We give a short overview of the DarkLight detector concept which is designed to search for a heavy photon A' with a mass in the range 10 MeV/c^2 < m(A') < 90 MeV/c^2 and which decays to lepton pairs. We describe the intended operating environment, the Jefferson Laboratory free electon laser, and a way to extend DarkLight's reach using A' --> invisible decays. Read More

We propose a new precision measurement of parity-violating electron scattering on the proton at very low Q^2 and forward angles to challenge predictions of the Standard Model and search for new physics. A unique opportunity exists to carry out the first precision measurement of the proton's weak charge, $Q_W =1 - 4\sin^2\theta_W$. A 2200 hour measurement of the parity violating asymmetry in elastic ep scattering at Q^2=0. Read More

The STAR experiment at the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC) at Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL) is in the process of designing and constructing a forward tracking system based on triple GEM technology. This upgrade is necessary to give STAR the capability to reconstruct and identify the charge sign of W bosons over an extended rapidity range through their leptonic decay mode into an electron (positron) and a neutrino. This will allow a detailed study of the flavor-separated spin structure of the proton in polarized p + p collisions uniquely available at RHIC. Read More

Three Gas-Electron-Multiplier tracking detectors with an active area of 10 cm x 10 cm and a two-dimensional, laser-etched orthogonal strip readout have been tested extensively in particle beams at the Meson Test Beam Facility at Fermilab. These detectors used GEM foils produced by Tech-Etch, Inc. They showed an efficiency in excess of 95% and spatial resolution better than 70 um. Read More

Future measurements of the flavor-separated spin structure of the proton via parity-violating W boson production at RHIC require an upgrade of the forward tracking system of the STAR detector. This upgrade will allow the reconstruction of the charge sign of electrons and positrons produced from decaying W bosons. A design based on six large area triple GEM disks using GEM foils produced by Tech-Etch Inc. Read More

The coincidence cross-section and the interference structure function, R_LT, were measured for the 12C(e,e'p) 11B reaction at quasielastic kinematics and central momentum transfer of q=400 MeV/c. The measurement was at an opening angle of theta_pq=11 degrees, covering a range in missing energy of E_m = 0 to 65 MeV. The R_LT structure function is found to be consistent with zero for E_m > 50 MeV, confirming an earlier study which indicated that R_L vanishes in this region. Read More