J. Bonn

J. Bonn
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Physics - Instrumentation and Detectors (9)
 
Nuclear Experiment (4)
 
High Energy Physics - Experiment (3)
 
High Energy Physics - Phenomenology (1)

Publications Authored By J. Bonn

2016Mar
Authors: M. Arenz, M. Babutzka, M. Bahr, J. P. Barrett, S. Bauer, M. Beck, A. Beglarian, J. Behrens, T. Bergmann, U. Besserer, J. Blümer, L. I. Bodine, K. Bokeloh, J. Bonn, B. Bornschein, L. Bornschein, S. Büsch, T. H. Burritt, S. Chilingaryan, T. J. Corona, L. De Viveiros, P. J. Doe, O. Dragoun, G. Drexlin, S. Dyba, S. Ebenhöch, K. Eitel, E. Ellinger, S. Enomoto, M. Erhard, D. Eversheim, M. Fedkevych, A. Felden, S. Fischer, J. A. Formaggio, F. Fränkle, D. Furse, M. Ghilea, W. Gil, F. Glück, A. Gonzalez Urena, S. Görhardt, S. Groh, S. Grohmann, R. Grössle, R. Gumbsheimer, M. Hackenjos, V. Hannen, F. Harms, N. Hauÿmann, F. Heizmann, K. Helbing, W. Herz, S. Hickford, D. Hilk, B. Hillen, T. Höhn, B. Holzapfel, M. Hötzel, M. A. Howe, A. Huber, A. Jansen, N. Kernert, L. Kippenbrock, M. Kleesiek, M. Klein, A. Kopmann, A. Kosmider, A. Kovalík, B. Krasch, M. Kraus, H. Krause, M. Krause, L. Kuckert, B. Kuffner, L. La Cascio, O. Lebeda, B. Leiber, J. Letnev, V. M. Lobashev, A. Lokhov, E. Malcherek, M. Mark, E. L. Martin, S. Mertens, S. Mirz, B. Monreal, K. Müller, M. Neuberger, H. Neumann, S. Niemes, M. Noe, N. S. Oblath, A. Off, H. -W. Ortjohann, A. Osipowicz, E. Otten, D. S. Parno, P. Plischke, A. W. P. Poon, M. Prall, F. Priester, P. C. -O. Ranitzsch, J. Reich, O. Rest, R. G. H. Robertson, M. Röllig, S. Rosendahl, S. Rupp, M. Rysavy, K. Schlösser, M. Schlösser, K. Schönung, M. Schrank, J. Schwarz, W. Seiler, H. Seitz-Moskaliuk, J. Sentkerestiova, A. Skasyrskaya, M. Slezak, A. Spalek, M. Steidl, N. Steinbrink, M. Sturm, M. Suesser, H. H. Telle, T. Thümmler, N. Titov, I. Tkachev, N. Trost, A. Unru, K. Valerius, D. Venos, R. Vianden, S. Vöcking, B. L. Wall, N. Wandkowsky, M. Weber, C. Weinheimer, C. Weiss, S. Welte, J. Wendel, K. L. Wierman, J. F. Wilkerson, D. Winzen, J. Wolf, S. Wüstling, M. Zacher, S. Zadoroghny, M. Zboril

The KATRIN experiment will probe the neutrino mass by measuring the beta-electron energy spectrum near the endpoint of tritium beta-decay. An integral energy analysis will be performed by an electro-static spectrometer (Main Spectrometer), an ultra-high vacuum vessel with a length of 23.2 m, a volume of 1240 m^3, and a complex inner electrode system with about 120000 individual parts. Read More

The KATRIN experiment is going to search for the average mass of the electron antineutrino with a sensitivity of 0.2 eV/c2. It uses a retardation spectrometer of MAC-E filter type to accurately measure the shape of the electron spectrum at the endpoint of tritium beta decay. Read More

The focal-plane detector system for the KArlsruhe TRItium Neutrino (KATRIN) experiment consists of a multi-pixel silicon p-i-n-diode array, custom readout electronics, two superconducting solenoid magnets, an ultra high-vacuum system, a high-vacuum system, calibration and monitoring devices, a scintillating veto, and a custom data-acquisition system. It is designed to detect the low-energy electrons selected by the KATRIN main spectrometer. We describe the system and summarize its performance after its final installation. Read More

The KATRIN experiment aims at the direct model-independent determination of the average electron neutrino mass via the measurement of the endpoint region of the tritium beta decay spectrum. The electron spectrometer of the MAC-E filter type is used, requiring very high stability of the electric filtering potential. This work proves the feasibility of implanted 83Rb/83mKr calibration electron sources which will be utilised in the additional monitor spectrometer sharing the high voltage with the main spectrometer of KATRIN. Read More

The Karlsruhe Tritium Neutrino (KATRIN) experiment will measure the absolute mass scale of neutrinos with a sensitivity of $\m_{\nu}$ = 200 meV/c$^2$ by high-precision spectroscopy close to the tritium beta-decay endpoint at 18.6 keV. Its Windowless Gaseous Tritium Source (WGTS) is a beta-decay source of high intensity ($10^{11}$/s) and stability, where high-purity molecular tritium at 30 K is circulated in a closed loop with a yearly throughput of 10 kg. Read More

The method of direct neutrino mass determination based on the kinematics of tritium beta decay, which is adopted by the KATRIN experiment, makes use of a large, high-resolution electrostatic spectrometer with magnetic adiabatic collimation. In order to target a sensitivity on the neutrino mass of 0.2 eV/c^2, a detailed understanding of the electromagnetic properties of the electron spectrometer is essential, requiring comprehensive calibration measurements with dedicated electron sources. Read More

Photoabsorption of nuclear gamma-rays in thin metallic convertors was examined with the aim to produce monoenergetic photoelectrons of kinetic energy around 18.6 keV and natural width of about 1 eV. Calculations were carried out for commercial photon sources of 241Am (1. Read More

The KATRIN experiment is going to search for the mass of the electron antineutrino down to 0.2 eV/c^2. In order to reach this sensitivity the background rate has to be understood and minimised to 0. Read More

We report on spectroscopy and time-of-flight measurements using an 18 keV fast-pulsed photoelectron source of adjustable intensity, ranging from single photoelectrons per pulse to 5 photoelectrons per microsecond at pulse repetition rates of up to 10 kHz. Short pulses between 40 ns and 40 microseconds in length were produced by switching light emitting diodes with central output wavelengths of 265 nm and 257 nm, in the deep ultraviolet (or UV-C) regime, at kHz frequencies. Such photoelectron sources can be useful calibration devices for testing the properties of high-resolution electrostatic spectrometers, like the ones used in current neutrino mass searches. Read More

The mono-energetic conversion electrons from the decay of 83mKr represent a unique tool for the energy calibration, energy scale monitoring and systematic studies of the tritium beta spectrum measurement in the neutrino mass experiment KATRIN. For this reason, the long term stability of energy of the 7.5 keV and 17. Read More

The aim of the KArlsruhe TRItium Neutrino experiment KATRIN is the determination of the absolute neutrino mass scale down to 0.2 eV, with essentially smaller model dependence than from cosmology and neutrinoless double beta decay. For this purpose, the integral electron energy spectrum is measured close to the endpoint of molecular tritium beta decay. Read More

The paper reports on the improved Mainz experiment on tritum $\beta$ spectroscopy which yields a 10 times' higher signal to background ratio than before. The main experimental effects and systematic uncertainties have been investigated in side experiments and possible error sources have been eliminated. Extensive data taking took place in the years 1997 to 2001. Read More