Ho. Kang - The Jefferson Lab Hall A Collaboration

Ho. Kang
Are you Ho. Kang?

Claim your profile, edit publications, add additional information:

Contact Details

Name
Ho. Kang
Affiliation
The Jefferson Lab Hall A Collaboration
City
Newport News
Country
United States

Pubs By Year

Pub Categories

 
Physics - Mesoscopic Systems and Quantum Hall Effect (4)
 
Quantum Physics (3)
 
Physics - Atomic Physics (2)
 
Nuclear Experiment (1)
 
High Energy Physics - Experiment (1)

Publications Authored By Ho. Kang

We predict a geometric quantum phase shift of a moving electric dipole in the presence of an external magnetic field at a distance. On the basis of the Lorentz-covariant field interaction approach, we show that a geometric phase appears under the condition that the dipole is moving in the field-free region, which is distinct from the topological He-McKellar-Wilkens phase generated by a direct overlap of the dipole and the field. We discuss the experimental feasibility of detecting this phase with atomic interferometry and argue that detection of this phase would result in a deeper understanding of the locality in quantum electromagnetic interaction. Read More

2017Feb
Affiliations: 1The Jefferson Lab Hall A Collaboration, 2The Jefferson Lab Hall A Collaboration, 3The Jefferson Lab Hall A Collaboration, 4The Jefferson Lab Hall A Collaboration, 5The Jefferson Lab Hall A Collaboration, 6The Jefferson Lab Hall A Collaboration, 7The Jefferson Lab Hall A Collaboration, 8The Jefferson Lab Hall A Collaboration, 9The Jefferson Lab Hall A Collaboration, 10The Jefferson Lab Hall A Collaboration, 11The Jefferson Lab Hall A Collaboration, 12The Jefferson Lab Hall A Collaboration, 13The Jefferson Lab Hall A Collaboration, 14The Jefferson Lab Hall A Collaboration, 15The Jefferson Lab Hall A Collaboration, 16The Jefferson Lab Hall A Collaboration, 17The Jefferson Lab Hall A Collaboration, 18The Jefferson Lab Hall A Collaboration, 19The Jefferson Lab Hall A Collaboration, 20The Jefferson Lab Hall A Collaboration, 21The Jefferson Lab Hall A Collaboration, 22The Jefferson Lab Hall A Collaboration, 23The Jefferson Lab Hall A Collaboration, 24The Jefferson Lab Hall A Collaboration, 25The Jefferson Lab Hall A Collaboration, 26The Jefferson Lab Hall A Collaboration, 27The Jefferson Lab Hall A Collaboration, 28The Jefferson Lab Hall A Collaboration, 29The Jefferson Lab Hall A Collaboration, 30The Jefferson Lab Hall A Collaboration, 31The Jefferson Lab Hall A Collaboration, 32The Jefferson Lab Hall A Collaboration, 33The Jefferson Lab Hall A Collaboration, 34The Jefferson Lab Hall A Collaboration, 35The Jefferson Lab Hall A Collaboration, 36The Jefferson Lab Hall A Collaboration, 37The Jefferson Lab Hall A Collaboration, 38The Jefferson Lab Hall A Collaboration, 39The Jefferson Lab Hall A Collaboration, 40The Jefferson Lab Hall A Collaboration, 41The Jefferson Lab Hall A Collaboration, 42The Jefferson Lab Hall A Collaboration, 43The Jefferson Lab Hall A Collaboration, 44The Jefferson Lab Hall A Collaboration, 45The Jefferson Lab Hall A Collaboration, 46The Jefferson Lab Hall A Collaboration, 47The Jefferson Lab Hall A Collaboration, 48The Jefferson Lab Hall A Collaboration, 49The Jefferson Lab Hall A Collaboration, 50The Jefferson Lab Hall A Collaboration, 51The Jefferson Lab Hall A Collaboration, 52The Jefferson Lab Hall A Collaboration, 53The Jefferson Lab Hall A Collaboration, 54The Jefferson Lab Hall A Collaboration, 55The Jefferson Lab Hall A Collaboration, 56The Jefferson Lab Hall A Collaboration, 57The Jefferson Lab Hall A Collaboration, 58The Jefferson Lab Hall A Collaboration, 59The Jefferson Lab Hall A Collaboration, 60The Jefferson Lab Hall A Collaboration, 61The Jefferson Lab Hall A Collaboration, 62The Jefferson Lab Hall A Collaboration, 63The Jefferson Lab Hall A Collaboration, 64The Jefferson Lab Hall A Collaboration, 65The Jefferson Lab Hall A Collaboration, 66The Jefferson Lab Hall A Collaboration, 67The Jefferson Lab Hall A Collaboration, 68The Jefferson Lab Hall A Collaboration, 69The Jefferson Lab Hall A Collaboration, 70The Jefferson Lab Hall A Collaboration, 71The Jefferson Lab Hall A Collaboration, 72The Jefferson Lab Hall A Collaboration, 73The Jefferson Lab Hall A Collaboration, 74The Jefferson Lab Hall A Collaboration, 75The Jefferson Lab Hall A Collaboration, 76The Jefferson Lab Hall A Collaboration, 77The Jefferson Lab Hall A Collaboration, 78The Jefferson Lab Hall A Collaboration, 79The Jefferson Lab Hall A Collaboration, 80The Jefferson Lab Hall A Collaboration, 81The Jefferson Lab Hall A Collaboration, 82The Jefferson Lab Hall A Collaboration, 83The Jefferson Lab Hall A Collaboration, 84The Jefferson Lab Hall A Collaboration, 85The Jefferson Lab Hall A Collaboration, 86The Jefferson Lab Hall A Collaboration, 87The Jefferson Lab Hall A Collaboration, 88The Jefferson Lab Hall A Collaboration, 89The Jefferson Lab Hall A Collaboration, 90The Jefferson Lab Hall A Collaboration, 91The Jefferson Lab Hall A Collaboration, 92The Jefferson Lab Hall A Collaboration, 93The Jefferson Lab Hall A Collaboration, 94The Jefferson Lab Hall A Collaboration, 95The Jefferson Lab Hall A Collaboration, 96The Jefferson Lab Hall A Collaboration, 97The Jefferson Lab Hall A Collaboration, 98The Jefferson Lab Hall A Collaboration

We report the first longitudinal/transverse separation of the deeply virtual exclusive $\pi^0$ electroproduction cross section off the neutron and coherent deuteron. The corresponding four structure functions $d\sigma_L/dt$, $d\sigma_T/dt$, $d\sigma_{LT}/dt$ and $d\sigma_{TT}/dt$ are extracted as a function of the momentum transfer to the recoil system at $Q^2$=1.75 GeV$^2$ and $x_B$=0. Read More

We investigate the measurement-induced dephasing of a qubit coupled with a single-mode cavity in the vacuum limit. Dephasing of the qubit state takes place through the ntanglement of the qubit and the single probe photon sent to the cavity, while the cavity mode never occupies a photon. We find that the qubit state is dephased even if the cavity is always in the vacuum state. Read More

We address the ultimate charge detection scheme with a quantum point contact. It is shown that a superposed input state is necessary to exploit the full sensitivity of a quantum point contact detector. The coherence of the input state provides an improvement in charge sensitivity, and this improvement is a result of the fundamental property of the scattering matrix. Read More

We present a scheme for tuning two quantum point contacts as a quantum-limited charge detector. Based on the scattering matrix approach, we analyze a general condition of quantum-limited detection with a single-channel quantum detector possessing time-reversal symmetry. From this analysis we find that quantum-limited detection can be easily realized with two quantum point contacts connected in series, which is not possible if only a single quantum point contact is used. Read More