H. Breuer - Jefferson Lab Hall A Collaboration

H. Breuer
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H. Breuer
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Jefferson Lab Hall A Collaboration
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Quantum Physics (34)
 
Nuclear Experiment (14)
 
Physics - Instrumentation and Detectors (7)
 
Physics - Statistical Mechanics (5)
 
Mathematical Physics (2)
 
Physics - Mesoscopic Systems and Quantum Hall Effect (2)
 
Mathematics - Mathematical Physics (2)
 
High Energy Physics - Experiment (2)
 
Instrumentation and Methods for Astrophysics (1)
 
Physics - Atomic Physics (1)

Publications Authored By H. Breuer

Trapped atomic ions enable a precise quantification of the flow of information between internal and external degrees of freedom by employing a non-Markovianity measure [H.-P. Breuer et al. Read More

We modify the path integral representation of exciton transport in open quantum systems such that an exact description of the quantum fluctuations around the classical evolution of the system is possible. As a consequence, the time evolution of the system observables is obtained by calculating the average of a stochastic difference equation which is weighted with a product of pseudo-probability density functions. From the exact equation of motion one can clearly identify the terms that are also present if we apply the truncated Wigner approximation. Read More

We extend the Nakajima-Zwanzig projection operator technique to the determination of multitime correlation functions of open quantum systems. The correlation functions are expressed in terms of certain multitime homogeneous and inhomogeneous memory kernels for which suitable equations of motion are derived. We show that under the condition of finite memory times these equations can be used to determine the memory kernels by employing an exact stochastic unraveling of the full system-environment dynamics. Read More

Characterizing properties of generic quantum systems of only a few tens of constituents can already become very challenging both experimentally and computationally. Here we show how autocorrelation functions in an interacting system of phonons as well as the quantum discord between distinct degrees of freedoms can be measured efficiently. As a benchmark, we show this in chains of up to 42 trapped ions, by tracing a single phonon excitation through interferometric measurements of only a single ion in the chain. Read More

Quantum discord in a bipartite system can be dynamically revealed and quantified through purely local operations on one of the two subsystems. To achieve this, the local detection method harnesses the influence of initial correlations on the reduced dynamics of an interacting bipartite system. This article's aim is to provide an accessible introduction to this method and to review recent theoretical and experimental progress. Read More

Structure functions, as measured in lepton-nucleon scattering, have proven to be very useful in studying the quark dynamics within the nucleon. However, it is experimentally difficult to separately determine the longitudinal and transverse structure functions, and consequently there are substantially less data available for the longitudinal structure function in particular. Here we present separated structure functions for hydrogen and deuterium at low four--momentum transfer squared, Q^2< 1 GeV^2, and compare these with parton distribution parameterizations and a k_T factorization approach. Read More

The standard model predicts that, in addition to a proton, an electron, and an antineutrino, a continuous spectrum of photons is emitted in the $\beta$ decay of the free neutron. We report on the RDK II experiment which measured the photon spectrum using two different detector arrays. An annular array of bismuth germanium oxide scintillators detected photons from 14 to 782~keV. Read More

We present the development of a segmented fast neutron spectrometer (FaNS-2) based upon plastic scintillator and $^3$He proportional counters. It was designed to measure both the flux and spectrum of fast neutrons in the energy range of few MeV to 1 GeV. FaNS-2 utilizes capture-gated spectroscopy to identify neutron events and reject backgrounds. Read More

We show that the spreading of the center-of-mass density of ultracold attractively interacting bosons can become superballistic in the presence of decoherence, via single-, two- and/or three-body losses. In the limit of weak decoherence, we analytically solve the numerical model introduced in [Phys. Rev. Read More

We establish a direct connection of quantum Markovianity of an open quantum system to its classical counterpart by generalizing the criterion based on the information flow. Here, the flow is characterized by the time evolution of Helstrom matrices, given by the weighted difference of statistical operators, under the action of the quantum dynamical evolution. It turns out that the introduced criterion is equivalent to P-divisibility of a quantum process, namely divisibility in terms of positive maps, which provides a direct connection to classical Markovian stochastic processes. Read More

The dynamical behavior of open quantum systems plays a key role in many applications of quantum mechanics, examples ranging from fundamental problems, such as the environment-induced decay of quantum coherence and relaxation in many-body systems, to applications in condensed matter theory, quantum transport, quantum chemistry and quantum information. In close analogy to a classical Markov process, the interaction of an open quantum system with a noisy environment is often modelled by a dynamical semigroup with a generator in Lindblad form, which describes a memoryless dynamics leading to an irreversible loss of characteristic quantum features. However, in many applications open systems exhibit pronounced memory effects and a revival of genuine quantum properties such as quantum coherence and correlations. Read More

We present measurements of nonproportionality in the scintillation light yield of bismuth germanate (BGO) for gamma-rays with energies between 6 keV and 662 keV. The scintillation light was read out by avalanche photodiodes (APDs) with both the BGO crystals and APDs operated at a temperature of approximately 90 K. Data were obtained using radioisotope sources to illuminate both a single BGO crystal in a small test cryostat and a 12-element detector in a neutron radiative beta-decay experiment. Read More

Background: Measurements of forward exclusive meson production at different squared four-momenta of the exchanged virtual photon, $Q^2$, and at different four-momentum transfer, t, can be used to probe QCD's transition from meson-nucleon degrees of freedom at long distances to quark-gluon degrees of freedom at short scales. Ratios of separated response functions in $\pi^-$ and $\pi^+$ electroproduction are particularly informative. The ratio for transverse photons may allow this transition to be more easily observed, while the ratio for longitudinal photons provides a crucial verification of the assumed pole dominance, needed for reliable extraction of the pion form factor from electroproduction data. Read More

Brownian motion is ballistic on short time scales and diffusive on long time scales. Our theoretical investigations indicate that one can observe the exact opposite - an "anomaleous diffusion process" where initially diffusive motion becomes ballistic on longer time scales - in an ultracold atom system with a size comparable to macromolecules. This system is a quantum matter-wave bright soliton subject to decoherence via three-particle losses for which we investigate the center-of-mass motion. Read More

A fast neutron spectrometer consisting of segmented plastic scintillator and He-3 proportional counters was constructed for the measurement of neutrons in the energy range 1 MeV to 200 MeV. We discuss its design, principles of operation, and the method of analysis. The detector is capable of observing very low neutron fluxes in the presence of ambient gamma background and does not require scintillator pulseshape discrimination. Read More

We present a scheme allowing to access the squeezing parameter of multimode fields by means of the dynamics of nonlocal quantum probes. The model under consideration is composed of two two-level systems which are coupled locally to an environment consisting of nonlocally correlated field modes given by two-mode Gaussian states. Introducing independently switchable interactions, one observes revivals of nonlocal coherences of the two-qubit system which are unambiguously connected to the squeezing parameter of the Gaussian environmental states. Read More

2014May
Affiliations: 1Jefferson Lab Hall A Collaboration, 2Jefferson Lab Hall A Collaboration, 3Jefferson Lab Hall A Collaboration, 4Jefferson Lab Hall A Collaboration, 5Jefferson Lab Hall A Collaboration, 6Jefferson Lab Hall A Collaboration, 7Jefferson Lab Hall A Collaboration, 8Jefferson Lab Hall A Collaboration, 9Jefferson Lab Hall A Collaboration, 10Jefferson Lab Hall A Collaboration, 11Jefferson Lab Hall A Collaboration, 12Jefferson Lab Hall A Collaboration, 13Jefferson Lab Hall A Collaboration, 14Jefferson Lab Hall A Collaboration, 15Jefferson Lab Hall A Collaboration, 16Jefferson Lab Hall A Collaboration, 17Jefferson Lab Hall A Collaboration, 18Jefferson Lab Hall A Collaboration, 19Jefferson Lab Hall A Collaboration, 20Jefferson Lab Hall A Collaboration, 21Jefferson Lab Hall A Collaboration, 22Jefferson Lab Hall A Collaboration, 23Jefferson Lab Hall A Collaboration, 24Jefferson Lab Hall A Collaboration, 25Jefferson Lab Hall A Collaboration, 26Jefferson Lab Hall A Collaboration, 27Jefferson Lab Hall A Collaboration, 28Jefferson Lab Hall A Collaboration, 29Jefferson Lab Hall A Collaboration, 30Jefferson Lab Hall A Collaboration, 31Jefferson Lab Hall A Collaboration, 32Jefferson Lab Hall A Collaboration, 33Jefferson Lab Hall A Collaboration, 34Jefferson Lab Hall A Collaboration, 35Jefferson Lab Hall A Collaboration, 36Jefferson Lab Hall A Collaboration, 37Jefferson Lab Hall A Collaboration, 38Jefferson Lab Hall A Collaboration, 39Jefferson Lab Hall A Collaboration, 40Jefferson Lab Hall A Collaboration, 41Jefferson Lab Hall A Collaboration, 42Jefferson Lab Hall A Collaboration, 43Jefferson Lab Hall A Collaboration, 44Jefferson Lab Hall A Collaboration, 45Jefferson Lab Hall A Collaboration, 46Jefferson Lab Hall A Collaboration, 47Jefferson Lab Hall A Collaboration, 48Jefferson Lab Hall A Collaboration, 49Jefferson Lab Hall A Collaboration, 50Jefferson Lab Hall A Collaboration, 51Jefferson Lab Hall A Collaboration, 52Jefferson Lab Hall A Collaboration, 53Jefferson Lab Hall A Collaboration, 54Jefferson Lab Hall A Collaboration, 55Jefferson Lab Hall A Collaboration, 56Jefferson Lab Hall A Collaboration, 57Jefferson Lab Hall A Collaboration, 58Jefferson Lab Hall A Collaboration, 59Jefferson Lab Hall A Collaboration, 60Jefferson Lab Hall A Collaboration, 61Jefferson Lab Hall A Collaboration, 62Jefferson Lab Hall A Collaboration, 63Jefferson Lab Hall A Collaboration, 64Jefferson Lab Hall A Collaboration, 65Jefferson Lab Hall A Collaboration, 66Jefferson Lab Hall A Collaboration, 67Jefferson Lab Hall A Collaboration, 68Jefferson Lab Hall A Collaboration, 69Jefferson Lab Hall A Collaboration, 70Jefferson Lab Hall A Collaboration, 71Jefferson Lab Hall A Collaboration, 72Jefferson Lab Hall A Collaboration, 73Jefferson Lab Hall A Collaboration, 74Jefferson Lab Hall A Collaboration, 75Jefferson Lab Hall A Collaboration, 76Jefferson Lab Hall A Collaboration, 77Jefferson Lab Hall A Collaboration, 78Jefferson Lab Hall A Collaboration, 79Jefferson Lab Hall A Collaboration, 80Jefferson Lab Hall A Collaboration, 81Jefferson Lab Hall A Collaboration, 82Jefferson Lab Hall A Collaboration, 83Jefferson Lab Hall A Collaboration, 84Jefferson Lab Hall A Collaboration, 85Jefferson Lab Hall A Collaboration, 86Jefferson Lab Hall A Collaboration, 87Jefferson Lab Hall A Collaboration, 88Jefferson Lab Hall A Collaboration, 89Jefferson Lab Hall A Collaboration, 90Jefferson Lab Hall A Collaboration, 91Jefferson Lab Hall A Collaboration, 92Jefferson Lab Hall A Collaboration, 93Jefferson Lab Hall A Collaboration, 94Jefferson Lab Hall A Collaboration, 95Jefferson Lab Hall A Collaboration, 96Jefferson Lab Hall A Collaboration, 97Jefferson Lab Hall A Collaboration, 98Jefferson Lab Hall A Collaboration

In the absence of accurate data on the free two-body hyperon-nucleon interaction, the spectra of hypernuclei can provide information on the details of the effective hyperon-nucleon interaction. Electroproduction of the hypernucleus Lambda-9Li has been studied for the first time with sub-MeV energy resolution in Hall A at Jefferson Lab on a 9Be target. In order to increase the counting rate and to provide unambiguous kaon identification, two superconducting septum magnets and a Ring Imaging CHerenkov detector (RICH) were added to the Hall A standard equipment. Read More

2014Apr
Affiliations: 1The Jefferson Lab Fpi Collaboration, 2The Jefferson Lab Fpi Collaboration, 3The Jefferson Lab Fpi Collaboration, 4The Jefferson Lab Fpi Collaboration, 5The Jefferson Lab Fpi Collaboration, 6The Jefferson Lab Fpi Collaboration, 7The Jefferson Lab Fpi Collaboration, 8The Jefferson Lab Fpi Collaboration, 9The Jefferson Lab Fpi Collaboration, 10The Jefferson Lab Fpi Collaboration, 11The Jefferson Lab Fpi Collaboration, 12The Jefferson Lab Fpi Collaboration, 13The Jefferson Lab Fpi Collaboration, 14The Jefferson Lab Fpi Collaboration, 15The Jefferson Lab Fpi Collaboration, 16The Jefferson Lab Fpi Collaboration, 17The Jefferson Lab Fpi Collaboration, 18The Jefferson Lab Fpi Collaboration, 19The Jefferson Lab Fpi Collaboration, 20The Jefferson Lab Fpi Collaboration, 21The Jefferson Lab Fpi Collaboration, 22The Jefferson Lab Fpi Collaboration, 23The Jefferson Lab Fpi Collaboration, 24The Jefferson Lab Fpi Collaboration, 25The Jefferson Lab Fpi Collaboration, 26The Jefferson Lab Fpi Collaboration, 27The Jefferson Lab Fpi Collaboration, 28The Jefferson Lab Fpi Collaboration, 29The Jefferson Lab Fpi Collaboration, 30The Jefferson Lab Fpi Collaboration, 31The Jefferson Lab Fpi Collaboration, 32The Jefferson Lab Fpi Collaboration, 33The Jefferson Lab Fpi Collaboration, 34The Jefferson Lab Fpi Collaboration, 35The Jefferson Lab Fpi Collaboration, 36The Jefferson Lab Fpi Collaboration, 37The Jefferson Lab Fpi Collaboration, 38The Jefferson Lab Fpi Collaboration, 39The Jefferson Lab Fpi Collaboration, 40The Jefferson Lab Fpi Collaboration, 41The Jefferson Lab Fpi Collaboration, 42The Jefferson Lab Fpi Collaboration, 43The Jefferson Lab Fpi Collaboration, 44The Jefferson Lab Fpi Collaboration, 45The Jefferson Lab Fpi Collaboration, 46The Jefferson Lab Fpi Collaboration, 47The Jefferson Lab Fpi Collaboration, 48The Jefferson Lab Fpi Collaboration, 49The Jefferson Lab Fpi Collaboration, 50The Jefferson Lab Fpi Collaboration, 51The Jefferson Lab Fpi Collaboration, 52The Jefferson Lab Fpi Collaboration, 53The Jefferson Lab Fpi Collaboration, 54The Jefferson Lab Fpi Collaboration, 55The Jefferson Lab Fpi Collaboration, 56The Jefferson Lab Fpi Collaboration, 57The Jefferson Lab Fpi Collaboration, 58The Jefferson Lab Fpi Collaboration, 59The Jefferson Lab Fpi Collaboration, 60The Jefferson Lab Fpi Collaboration, 61The Jefferson Lab Fpi Collaboration, 62The Jefferson Lab Fpi Collaboration, 63The Jefferson Lab Fpi Collaboration, 64The Jefferson Lab Fpi Collaboration, 65The Jefferson Lab Fpi Collaboration, 66The Jefferson Lab Fpi Collaboration, 67The Jefferson Lab Fpi Collaboration, 68The Jefferson Lab Fpi Collaboration, 69The Jefferson Lab Fpi Collaboration, 70The Jefferson Lab Fpi Collaboration, 71The Jefferson Lab Fpi Collaboration, 72The Jefferson Lab Fpi Collaboration, 73The Jefferson Lab Fpi Collaboration, 74The Jefferson Lab Fpi Collaboration, 75The Jefferson Lab Fpi Collaboration, 76The Jefferson Lab Fpi Collaboration, 77The Jefferson Lab Fpi Collaboration, 78The Jefferson Lab Fpi Collaboration, 79The Jefferson Lab Fpi Collaboration, 80The Jefferson Lab Fpi Collaboration, 81The Jefferson Lab Fpi Collaboration, 82The Jefferson Lab Fpi Collaboration, 83The Jefferson Lab Fpi Collaboration, 84The Jefferson Lab Fpi Collaboration, 85The Jefferson Lab Fpi Collaboration, 86The Jefferson Lab Fpi Collaboration, 87The Jefferson Lab Fpi Collaboration, 88The Jefferson Lab Fpi Collaboration

The study of exclusive $\pi^{\pm}$ electroproduction on the nucleon, including separation of the various structure functions, is of interest for a number of reasons. The ratio $R_L=\sigma_L^{\pi^-}/\sigma_L^{\pi^+}$ is sensitive to isoscalar contamination to the dominant isovector pion exchange amplitude, which is the basis for the determination of the charged pion form factor from electroproduction data. A change in the value of $R_T=\sigma_T^{\pi^-}/\sigma_T^{\pi^+}$ from unity at small $-t$, to 1/4 at large $-t$, would suggest a transition from coupling to a (virtual) pion to coupling to individual quarks. Read More

We show that the ground-state quantum correlations of an Ising model can be detected by monitoring the time evolution of a single spin alone, and that the critical point of a quantum phase transition is detected through a maximum of a suitably defined observable. A proposed implementation with trapped ions realizes an experimental probe of quantum phase transitions which is based on quantum correlations and scalable for large system sizes. Read More

Recently, a series of different measures quantifying memory effects in the quantum dynamics of open systems has been proposed. Here, we derive a mathematical representation for the non-Markovianity measure based on the exchange of information between the open system and its environment which substantially simplifies its numerical and experimental determination, and fully reveals the locality and universality of non-Markovianity in the quantum state space. We further illustrate the application of this representation by means of an all-optical experiment which allows the measurement of the degree of memory effects in a photonic quantum process with high accuracy. Read More

Successful implementation of several quantum information and communication protocols require distributing entangled pairs of quantum bits in reliable manner. While there exists a substantial amount of recent theoretical and experimental activities dealing with non-Markovian quantum dynamics, experimental application and verification of the usefulness of memory-effects for quantum information tasks is still missing. We combine these two aspects and show experimentally that a recently introduced concept of nonlocal memory effects allows to protect and distribute polarization entangled pairs of photons in efficient manner within polarization-maintaining (PM) optical fibers. Read More

The measurement of correlations between different degrees of freedom is an important, but in general extremely difficult task in many applications of quantum mechanics. Here, we report an all-optical experimental detection and quantification of quantum correlations between the polarization and the frequency degrees of freedom of single photons by means of local operations acting only on the polarization degree of freedom. These operations only require experimental control over an easily accessible two-dimensional subsystem, despite handling strongly mixed quantum states comprised of a continuum of orthogonal frequency states. Read More

As one of the most striking features of quantum mechanics, quantum correlations are at the heart of quantum information science. Detection of correlations usually requires access to all the correlated subsystems. However, in many realistic scenarios this is not feasible since only some of the subsystems can be controlled and measured. Read More

We review the model of two qubits coupled locally to an environment which consists of nonlocally correlated field modes [Phys. Rev.Lett. Read More

We study the time evolution of four distance measures in the presence of initial systemenvironment correlations. It is well-known that the trace distance between two quantum states of an open system may increase due to initial correlations which leads to a breakdown of the contractivity of the reduced dynamics. Here we compare and analyze, for two different models, the time evolution of the trace distance, the Bures metric, the Hellinger distance and the Jensen-Shannon divergence regarding an increase above their initial values, witnessing initial correlations. Read More

Employing the stochastic wave function method, we study quantum features of stochastic entropy production in nonequilibrium processes of open systems. It is demonstarted that continuous measurements on the environment introduce an additional, non-thermal contribution to the entropy flux, which is shown to be a direct consequence of quantum fluctuations. These features lead to a quantum definition of single trajectory entropy contributions, which accounts for the difference between classical and quantum trajectories and results in a quantum correction to the standard form of the integral fluctuation theorem. Read More

We present a first-principles derivation of the Markovian semi-group master equation without invoking the rotating wave approximation (RWA). Instead we use a time coarse-graining approach which leaves us with a free timescale parameter, which we can optimize. Comparing this approach to the standard RWA-based Markovian master equation, we find that significantly better agreement is possible using the coarse-graining approach, for a three-level model coupled to a bath of oscillators, whose exact dynamics we can solve for at zero temperature. Read More

Exploiting previous results on Markovian dynamics and fluctuation theorems, we study the consequences of memory effects on single realizations of nonequilibrium processes within an open system approach. The entropy production along single trajectories for forward and backward processes is obtained with the help of a recently proposed classical-like non-Markovian stochastic unravelling, which is demonstrated to lead to a correction of the standard entropic fluctuation theorem. This correction is interpreted as resulting from the interplay between the information extracted from the system through measurements and the flow of information from the environment to the open system: Due to memory effects single realizations of a dynamical process are no longer independent, and their correlations fundamentally affect the behavior of entropy fluctuations. Read More

Recently, we proposed a method for the local detection of quantum correlations on the basis of local measurements and state tomography at different instances in time [Phys. Rev. Lett. Read More

We obtain exact analytic expressions for a class of functions expressed as integrals over the Haar measure of the unitary group in d dimensions. Based on these general mathematical results, we investigate generic dynamical properties of complex open quantum systems, employing arguments from ensemble theory. We further generalize these results to arbitrary eigenvalue distributions, allowing a detailed comparison of typical regular and chaotic systems with the help of concepts from random matrix theory. Read More

We present a straightforward method for particle identification and background rejection in $^3$He proportional counters for use in neutron detection. By measuring the risetime and pulse height of the preamplifier signals, one may define a region in the risetime versus pulse height space where the events are predominately from neutron interactions. For six proportional counters surveyed in a low-background environment, we demonstrate the ability to reject alpha-particle events with an efficiency of 99%. Read More

The parity-violating asymmetry arising from inelastic electron-nucleon scattering at backward angle (~95 degrees) near the Delta(1232) resonance has been measured using a hydrogen target. From this asymmetry, we extracted the axial transition form factor G^A_{N\Delta}, a function of the axial Adler form factors C^A_i. Though G^A_{N\Delta} has been previously studied using charged current reactions, this is the first measurement of the weak neutral current excitation of the Delta using a proton target. Read More

We show that perfect quantum teleportation can be achieved with mixed photon polarization states when nonlocal memory effects influence the dynamics of the quantum system. The protocol is carried out with a pair of photons, whose initial maximally entangled state is destroyed by local decoherence prior to teleportation. It is demonstrated that the presence of strong nonlocal memory effects, which arise from initial correlations between the environments of the photons, allow to restore perfect teleportation. Read More

We study a recently proposed measure for the quantification of quantum non-Markovianity in the dynamics of open systems which is based on the exchange of information between the open system and its environment. This measure relates the degree of memory effects to certain optimal initial state pairs featuring a maximal flow of information from the environment back to the open system. We rigorously prove that the states of these optimal pairs must lie on the boundary of the space of physical states and that they must be orthogonal. Read More

The study of open quantum systems is important for fundamental issues of quantum physics as well as for technological applications such as quantum information processing. Recent developments in this field have increased our basic understanding on how non-Markovian effects influence the dynamics of an open quantum system, paving the way to exploit memory effects for various quantum control tasks. Most often, the environment of an open system is thought to act as a sink for the system information. Read More

Employing a recently proposed measure for quantum non-Markovianity, we carry out a systematic study of the size of memory effects in the spin-boson model for a large region of temperature and frequency cutoff parameters. The dynamics of the open system is described utilizing a second-order time-convolutionless master equation without the Markov or rotating wave approximations. While the dynamics is found to be strongly non-Markovian for low temperatures and cutoffs, in general, we observe a special regime favoring Markovian behavior. Read More

As part of an experiment to measure the spectrum of photons emitted in beta-decay of the free neutron, we developed and operated a detector consisting of 12 bismuth germanate (BGO) crystals coupled to avalanche photodiodes (APDs). The detector was operated near liquid nitrogen temperature in the bore of a superconducting magnet and registered photons with energies from 5 keV to 1000 keV. To enlarge the detection range, we also directly detected soft X-rays with energies between 0. Read More

We investigate the equilibration and thermalization properties of quantum systems interacting with a finite dimensional environment. By exploiting the concept of time averaged states, we introduce a completely positive map which allows to describe in a quantitative way the dependence of the equilibrium state on the initial condition. Our results show that the thermalization of quantum systems is favored if the dynamics induces small system-environment correlations, as well as small changes in the environment, as measured by the trace distance. Read More

The basic features of the dynamics of open quantum systems, such as the dissipation of energy, the decay of coherences, the relaxation to an equilibrium or non-equilibrium stationary state, and the transport of excitations in complex structures are of central importance in many applications of quantum mechanics. The theoretical description, analysis and control of non-Markovian quantum processes play an important role in this context. While in a Markovian process an open system irretrievably loses information to its surroundings, non-Markovian processes feature a flow of information from the environment back to the open system, which implies the presence of memory effects and represents the key property of non-Markovian quantum behavior. Read More

The characterization of a liquid scintillator incorporating an aqueous solution of enriched lithium chloride to produce a scintillator with 0.40% Li-6 is presented, including the performance of the scintillator in terms of its optical properties and neutron response. The scintillator was incorporated into a fast neutron spectrometer, and the light output spectra from 2. Read More

2012May
Authors: H. Fonvieille1, G. Laveissiere2, N. Degrande3, S. Jaminion4, C. Jutier5, L. Todor6, R. Di Salvo7, L. Van Hoorebeke8, L. C. Alexa9, B. D. Anderson10, K. A. Aniol11, K. Arundell12, G. Audit13, L. Auerbach14, F. T. Baker15, M. Baylac16, J. Berthot17, P. Y. Bertin18, W. Bertozzi19, L. Bimbot20, W. U. Boeglin21, E. J. Brash22, V. Breton23, H. Breuer24, E. Burtin25, J. R. Calarco26, L. S. Cardman27, C. Cavata28, C. -C. Chang29, J. -P. Chen30, E. Chudakov31, E. Cisbani32, D. S. Dale33, C. W. deJager34, R. De Leo35, A. Deur36, N. d'Hose37, G. E. Dodge38, J. J. Domingo39, L. Elouadrhiri40, M. B. Epstein41, L. A. Ewell42, J. M. Finn43, K. G. Fissum44, G. Fournier45, B. Frois46, S. Frullani47, C. Furget48, H. Gao49, J. Gao50, F. Garibaldi51, A. Gasparian52, S. Gilad53, R. Gilman54, A. Glamazdin55, C. Glashausser56, J. Gomez57, V. Gorbenko58, P. Grenier59, P. A. M. Guichon60, J. O. Hansen61, R. Holmes62, M. Holtrop63, C. Howell64, G. M. Huber65, C. E. Hyde66, S. Incerti67, M. Iodice68, J. Jardillier69, M. K. Jones70, W. Kahl71, S. Kato72, A. T. Katramatou73, J. J. Kelly74, S. Kerhoas75, A. Ketikyan76, M. Khayat77, K. Kino78, S. Kox79, L. H. Kramer80, K. S. Kumar81, G. Kumbartzki82, M. Kuss83, A. Leone84, J. J. LeRose85, M. Liang86, R. A. Lindgren87, N. Liyanage88, G. J. Lolos89, R. W. Lourie90, R. Madey91, K. Maeda92, S. Malov93, D. M. Manley94, C. Marchand95, D. Marchand96, D. J. Margaziotis97, P. Markowitz98, J. Marroncle99, J. Martino100, K. McCormick101, J. McIntyre102, S. Mehrabyan103, F. Merchez104, Z. E. Meziani105, R. Michaels106, G. W. Miller107, J. Y. Mougey108, S. K. Nanda109, D. Neyret110, E. A. J. M. Offermann111, Z. Papandreou112, B. Pasquini113, C. F. Perdrisat114, R. Perrino115, G. G. Petratos116, S. Platchkov117, R. Pomatsalyuk118, D. L. Prout119, V. A. Punjabi120, T. Pussieux121, G. Quemener122, R. D. Ransome123, O. Ravel124, J. S. Real125, F. Renard126, Y. Roblin127, D. Rowntree128, G. Rutledge129, P. M. Rutt130, A. Saha131, T. Saito132, A. J. Sarty133, A. Serdarevic134, T. Smith135, G. Smirnov136, K. Soldi137, P. Sorokin138, P. A. Souder139, R. Suleiman140, J. A. Templon141, T. Terasawa142, R. Tieulent143, E. Tomasi-Gustaffson144, H. Tsubota145, H. Ueno146, P. E. Ulmer147, G. M. Urciuoli148, M. Vanderhaeghen149, R. L. J. Van der Meer150, R. Van De Vyver151, P. Vernin152, B. Vlahovic153, H. Voskanyan154, E. Voutier155, J. W. Watson156, L. B. Weinstein157, K. Wijesooriya158, R. Wilson159, B. B. Wojtsekhowski160, D. G. Zainea161, W. -M. Zhang162, J. Zhao163, Z. -L. Zhou164
Affiliations: 1The Jefferson Lab Hall A Collaboration, 2The Jefferson Lab Hall A Collaboration, 3The Jefferson Lab Hall A Collaboration, 4The Jefferson Lab Hall A Collaboration, 5The Jefferson Lab Hall A Collaboration, 6The Jefferson Lab Hall A Collaboration, 7The Jefferson Lab Hall A Collaboration, 8The Jefferson Lab Hall A Collaboration, 9The Jefferson Lab Hall A Collaboration, 10The Jefferson Lab Hall A Collaboration, 11The Jefferson Lab Hall A Collaboration, 12The Jefferson Lab Hall A Collaboration, 13The Jefferson Lab Hall A Collaboration, 14The Jefferson Lab Hall A Collaboration, 15The Jefferson Lab Hall A Collaboration, 16The Jefferson Lab Hall A Collaboration, 17The Jefferson Lab Hall A Collaboration, 18The Jefferson Lab Hall A Collaboration, 19The Jefferson Lab Hall A Collaboration, 20The Jefferson Lab Hall A Collaboration, 21The Jefferson Lab Hall A Collaboration, 22The Jefferson Lab Hall A Collaboration, 23The Jefferson Lab Hall A Collaboration, 24The Jefferson Lab Hall A 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Virtual Compton Scattering (VCS) on the proton has been studied at Jefferson Lab using the exclusive photon electroproduction reaction (e p --> e p gamma). This paper gives a detailed account of the analysis which has led to the determination of the structure functions P_LL-P_TT/epsilon and P_LT, and the electric and magnetic generalized polarizabilities (GPs) alpha_E(Q^2) and beta_M(Q^2) at values of the four-momentum transfer squared Q^2= 0.92 and 1. Read More

Quantum discord is usually referred to as a measure for quantum correlations. In the search of the fundamental resource to gain a quantum advantage in quantum information applications, quantum discord is considered a promising candidate. In this paper we present an alternative view on quantum correlations in terms of the rank of the correlation matrix as introduced by Dakic, Vedral, and Brukner [Phys. Read More

We explore the possibility to generate nonlocal dynamical maps of an open quantum system through local system-environment interactions. Employing a generic decoherence process induced by a local interaction Hamiltonian, we show that initial correlations in a composite environment can lead to a nonlocal open system dynamics which exhibits strong memory effects although the local dynamics is Markovian. In a model of two entangled photons interacting with two dephasing environments we find a direct connection between the degree of memory effects and the amount of correlations in the initial environmental state. Read More

Realistic quantum mechanical systems are always exposed to an external environment. The presence of the environment often gives rise to a Markovian process in which the system loses information to its surroundings. However, many quantum systems exhibit a pronounced non-Markovian behavior in which there is a flow of information from the environment back to the system, signifying the presence of quantum memory effects [1-5]. Read More

Non-Markovian processes have recently become a central topic in the study of open quantum systems. We realize experimentally non-Markovian decoherence processes of single photons by combining time delay and evolution in a polarization-maintaining optical fiber. The experiment allows the identification of the process with strongest memory effects as well as the determination of a recently proposed measure for the degree of quantum non-Markovianity based on the exchange of information between the open system and its environment. Read More

We introduce a non-Markovianity measure for continuous variable open quantum systems based on the idea put forward in H.-P. Breuer et al. Read More

We develop a general strategy for the detection of nonclassical system-environment correlations in the initial states of an open quantum system. The method employs a dephasing map which operates locally on the open system and leads to an experimentally accessible witness for genuine quantum correlations, measuring the Hilbert-Schmidt distance between pairs of open system states. We further derive the expectation value of the witness for various random matrix ensembles modeling generic features of complex quantum systems. Read More

We discuss the dynamical behavior of the entanglement between the internal and the external degrees of freedom of a trapped atom in electromagnetically-induced transparency (EIT) laser cooling. It is shown that essential features of the intricate entanglement dynamics observed in full numerical simulations of the underlying quantum master equation can be understood in terms of a two-state model on the basis of Landau-Zener splittings in the atom-laser field Hamiltonian. An extension of this model to an effective non-Hermitian Hamiltonian is constructed which describes the decay of entanglement by spontaneous emission processes. Read More

We discuss the conceptually different definitions used for the non-Markovianity of classical and quantum processes. The well-established definition for non-Markovianity of a classical stochastic process represents a condition on the Kolmogorov hierarchy of the n-point joint probability distributions. Since this definition cannot be transferred to the quantum regime, quantum non-Markovianity has recently been defined and quantified in terms of the underlying quantum dynamical map, using either its divisibility properties or the behavior of the trace distance between pairs of initial states. Read More