G. Perumpilly - The. MAJORANA. Collaboration

G. Perumpilly
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Name
G. Perumpilly
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The. MAJORANA. Collaboration
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Nuclear Experiment (9)
 
Earth and Planetary Astrophysics (8)
 
Physics - Instrumentation and Detectors (6)
 
High Energy Physics - Experiment (5)
 
Instrumentation and Methods for Astrophysics (3)
 
Solar and Stellar Astrophysics (2)
 
High Energy Physics - Phenomenology (1)
 
Cosmology and Nongalactic Astrophysics (1)

Publications Authored By G. Perumpilly

The COHERENT collaboration's primary objective is to measure coherent elastic neutrino-nucleus scattering (CEvNS) using the unique, high-quality source of tens-of-MeV neutrinos provided by the Spallation Neutron Source (SNS) at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL). In spite of its large cross section, the CEvNS process has never been observed, due to tiny energies of the resulting nuclear recoils which are out of reach for standard neutrino detectors. The measurement of CEvNS has now become feasible, thanks to the development of ultra-sensitive technology for rare decay and weakly-interacting massive particle (dark matter) searches. Read More

Many current and future dark matter and neutrino detectors are designed to measure scintillation light with a large array of photomultiplier tubes (PMTs). The energy resolution and particle identification capabilities of these detectors depend in part on the ability to accurately identify individual photoelectrons in PMT waveforms despite large variability in pulse amplitudes and pulse pileup. We describe a Bayesian technique that can identify the times of individual photoelectrons in a sampled PMT waveform without deconvolution, even when pileup is present. Read More

We study the possibility of using CsI[Na] scintillators as an advantageous target for the detection of coherent elastic neutrino-nucleus scattering (CENNS), using the neutrino emissions from the SNS spallation source at Oak Ridge National Laboratory. The response of this material to low-energy nuclear recoils like those expected from this process is characterized. Backgrounds are studied using a 2 kg low-background prototype crystal in a dedicated radiation shield. Read More

The direct search for dark matter is entering a period of increased sensitivity to the hypothetical Weakly Interacting Massive Particle (WIMP). One such technology that is being examined is a scintillation only noble liquid experiment, MiniCLEAN. MiniCLEAN utilizes over 500 kg of liquid cryogen to detect nuclear recoils from WIMP dark matter and serves as a demonstration for a future detector of order 50 to 100 tonnes. Read More

2012Oct
Affiliations: 1The. MAJORANA. Collaboration, 2The. MAJORANA. Collaboration, 3The. MAJORANA. Collaboration, 4The. MAJORANA. Collaboration, 5The. MAJORANA. Collaboration, 6The. MAJORANA. Collaboration, 7The. MAJORANA. Collaboration, 8The. MAJORANA. Collaboration, 9The. MAJORANA. Collaboration, 10The. MAJORANA. Collaboration, 11The. MAJORANA. Collaboration, 12The. MAJORANA. Collaboration, 13The. MAJORANA. Collaboration, 14The. MAJORANA. Collaboration, 15The. MAJORANA. Collaboration, 16The. MAJORANA. Collaboration, 17The. MAJORANA. Collaboration, 18The. MAJORANA. Collaboration, 19The. MAJORANA. Collaboration, 20The. MAJORANA. Collaboration, 21The. MAJORANA. Collaboration, 22The. MAJORANA. Collaboration, 23The. MAJORANA. Collaboration, 24The. MAJORANA. Collaboration, 25The. MAJORANA. Collaboration, 26The. MAJORANA. Collaboration, 27The. MAJORANA. Collaboration, 28The. MAJORANA. Collaboration, 29The. MAJORANA. Collaboration, 30The. MAJORANA. Collaboration, 31The. MAJORANA. Collaboration, 32The. MAJORANA. Collaboration, 33The. MAJORANA. Collaboration, 34The. MAJORANA. Collaboration, 35The. MAJORANA. Collaboration, 36The. MAJORANA. Collaboration, 37The. MAJORANA. Collaboration, 38The. MAJORANA. Collaboration, 39The. MAJORANA. Collaboration, 40The. MAJORANA. Collaboration, 41The. MAJORANA. Collaboration, 42The. MAJORANA. Collaboration, 43The. MAJORANA. Collaboration, 44The. MAJORANA. Collaboration, 45The. MAJORANA. Collaboration, 46The. MAJORANA. Collaboration, 47The. MAJORANA. Collaboration, 48The. MAJORANA. Collaboration, 49The. MAJORANA. Collaboration, 50The. MAJORANA. Collaboration, 51The. MAJORANA. Collaboration, 52The. MAJORANA. Collaboration, 53The. MAJORANA. Collaboration, 54The. MAJORANA. Collaboration, 55The. MAJORANA. Collaboration, 56The. MAJORANA. Collaboration, 57The. MAJORANA. Collaboration, 58The. MAJORANA. Collaboration, 59The. MAJORANA. Collaboration, 60The. MAJORANA. Collaboration, 61The. MAJORANA. Collaboration, 62The. MAJORANA. Collaboration, 63The. MAJORANA. Collaboration, 64The. MAJORANA. Collaboration, 65The. MAJORANA. Collaboration, 66The. MAJORANA. Collaboration, 67The. MAJORANA. Collaboration, 68The. MAJORANA. Collaboration, 69The. MAJORANA. Collaboration, 70The. MAJORANA. Collaboration, 71The. MAJORANA. Collaboration, 72The. MAJORANA. Collaboration, 73The. MAJORANA. Collaboration, 74The. MAJORANA. Collaboration, 75The. MAJORANA. Collaboration, 76The. MAJORANA. Collaboration, 77The. MAJORANA. Collaboration, 78The. MAJORANA. Collaboration, 79The. MAJORANA. Collaboration, 80The. MAJORANA. Collaboration, 81The. MAJORANA. Collaboration, 82The. MAJORANA. Collaboration, 83The. MAJORANA. Collaboration

The MAJORANA DEMONSTRATOR will search for the neutrinoless double-beta decay of the 76Ge isotope with a mixed array of enriched and natural germanium detectors. The observation of this rare decay would indicate the neutrino is its own anti-particle, demonstrate that lepton number is not conserved, and provide information on the absolute mass-scale of the neutrino. The DEMONSTRATOR is being assembled at the 4850 foot level of the Sanford Underground Research Facility in Lead, South Dakota. Read More

A study of signals originating near the lithium-diffused n+ contact of p-type point contact (PPC) high purity germanium detectors (HPGe) is presented. The transition region between the active germanium and the fully dead layer of the n+ contact is examined. Energy depositions in this transition region are shown to result in partial charge collection. Read More

The observation of neutrinoless double-beta decay would resolve the Majorana nature of the neutrino and could provide information on the absolute scale of the neutrino mass. The initial phase of the Majorana experiment, known as the Demonstrator, will house 40 kg of Ge in an ultra-low background shielded environment at the 4850' level of the Sanford Underground Laboratory in Lead, SD. The objective of the Demonstrator is to determine whether a future 1-tonne experiment can achieve a background goal of one count per tonne-year in a narrow region of interest around the 76Ge neutrinoless double-beta decay peak. Read More

A brief review of the history and neutrino physics of double beta decay is given. A description of the MAJORANA DEMONSTRATOR research and development program including background reduction techniques is presented in some detail. The application of point contact (PC) detectors to the experiment is discussed, including the effectiveness of pulse shape analysis. Read More

Neutrinoless double-beta decay experiments can potentially determine the Majorana or Dirac nature of the neutrino, and aid in understanding the neutrino absolute mass scale and hierarchy. Future 76Ge-based searches target a half-life sensitivity of >10^27 y to explore the inverted neutrino mass hierarchy. Reaching this sensitivity will require a background rate of <1 count tonne^-1 y^-1 in a 4-keV-wide spectral region of interest surrounding the Q value of the decay. Read More

The observation of neutrinoless double-beta decay would determine whether the neutrino is a Majorana particle and provide information on the absolute scale of neutrino mass. The MAJORANA Collaboration is constructing the DEMONSTRATOR, an array of germanium detectors, to search for neutrinoless double-beta decay of 76-Ge. The DEMONSTRATOR will contain 40 kg of germanium; up to 30 kg will be enriched to 86% in 76-Ge. Read More

We report the discovery of HAT-P-17b,c, a multi-planet system with an inner transiting planet in a short-period, eccentric orbit and an outer planet in a 4.8 yr, nearly circular orbit. The inner planet, HAT-P-17b, transits the bright V = 10. Read More

2010Aug
Affiliations: 1Harvard-Smithsonian CfA, Cambridge, MA, USA, 2Harvard-Smithsonian CfA, Cambridge, MA, USA, 3Harvard-Smithsonian CfA, Cambridge, MA, USA, 4Harvard-Smithsonian CfA, Cambridge, MA, USA, 5Konkoly Observatory, Budapest, Hungary, 6Harvard-Smithsonian CfA, Cambridge, MA, USA, 7Astronomy Department, Yale University, New Haven, CT, 8California Institute of Technology, Department of Astrophysics, Pasadena, CA, 9Department of Astronomy, UC Berkeley, Berkeley, CA, 10Department of Astronomy, UC Berkeley, Berkeley, CA, 11Harvard-Smithsonian CfA, Cambridge, MA, USA, 12Harvard-Smithsonian CfA, Cambridge, MA, USA, 13LCOGT, Santa Barbara, CA, 14Harvard-Smithsonian CfA, Cambridge, MA, USA, 15Niels Bohr Institute, Copenhagen University, Denmark, 16Harvard-Smithsonian CfA, Cambridge, MA, USA, 17Harvard-Smithsonian CfA, Cambridge, MA, USA, 18Harvard-Smithsonian CfA, Cambridge, MA, USA, 19Harvard-Smithsonian CfA, Cambridge, MA, USA, 20Hungarian Astronomical Association, Budapest, 21Hungarian Astronomical Association, Budapest, 22Hungarian Astronomical Association, Budapest

We report the discovery of four relatively massive (2-7MJ) transiting extrasolar planets. HAT-P-20b orbits a V=11.339 K3 dwarf star with a period P=2. Read More

2010Aug
Affiliations: 1Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics, Cambridge, MA, 2Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics, Cambridge, MA, 3Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics, Cambridge, MA, 4Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics, Cambridge, MA, 5Konkoly Observatory, Budapest, Hungary, 6Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics, Cambridge, MA, 7Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics, Cambridge, MA, 8Yale University, New Haven, CT, 9California Institute of Technology, Pasadena, CA, 10Univ. of California, Berkeley, CA, 11Univ. of California, Berkeley, CA, 12Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics, Cambridge, MA, 13Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics, Cambridge, MA, 14Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics, Cambridge, MA, 15Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics, Cambridge, MA, 16Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics, Cambridge, MA, 17Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics, Cambridge, MA, 18Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics, Cambridge, MA, 19Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics, Cambridge, MA, 20Hungarian Astronomical Association, Budapest, 21Hungarian Astronomical Association, Budapest, 22Hungarian Astronomical Association, Budapest

We report the discovery of HAT-P-25b, a transiting extrasolar planet orbiting the V = 13.19 G5 dwarf star GSC 1788-01237, with a period P = 3.652836 +/- 0. Read More

2010Aug
Affiliations: 1Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics, 2Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics, 3Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics, 4Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics, 5Las Cumbres Observatory, 6Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics, 7Konkoly Observatory, 8Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics, 9Univ. of California, Berkeley, 10Dept. of Astronomy, Yale University, 11California Institute of Technology, Dept. of Astrophysics, 12Univ. of California, Berkeley, 13Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics, 14Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics, 15Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics, 16Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics, 17Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics, 18Hungarian Astronomical Association, 19Hungarian Astronomical Association, 20Hungarian Astronomical Association

We report the discovery of HAT-P-24b, a transiting extrasolar planet orbiting the moderately bright V=11.818 F8 dwarf star GSC 0774-01441, with a period P = 3.3552464 +/- 0. Read More