G. Bruce Berriman - NASA Exoplanet Science Institute, Pasadena, CA

G. Bruce Berriman
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Name
G. Bruce Berriman
Affiliation
NASA Exoplanet Science Institute, Pasadena, CA
City
Pasadena
Country
United States

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Pub Categories

 
Instrumentation and Methods for Astrophysics (25)
 
Computer Science - Distributed; Parallel; and Cluster Computing (5)
 
Astrophysics (4)
 
Solar and Stellar Astrophysics (3)
 
Computer Science - Digital Libraries (3)
 
Earth and Planetary Astrophysics (3)
 
Computer Science - Software Engineering (2)
 
Cosmology and Nongalactic Astrophysics (1)
 
Computer Science - Information Retrieval (1)
 
Computer Science - Human-Computer Interaction (1)
 
Physics - Physics and Society (1)

Publications Authored By G. Bruce Berriman

The Astrophysics Source Code Library (ASCL) is a free online registry of research codes; it is indexed by ADS and Web of Science and has over 1300 code entries. Its entries are increasingly used to cite software; citations have been doubling each year since 2012 and every major astronomy journal accepts citations to the ASCL. Codes in the resource cover all aspects of astrophysics research and many programming languages are represented. Read More

Improving software citation and credit continues to be a topic of interest across and within many disciplines, with numerous efforts underway. In this Birds of a Feather (BoF) session, we started with a list of actionable ideas from last year's BoF and other similar efforts and worked alone or in small groups to begin implementing them. Work was captured in a common Google document; the session organizers will disseminate or otherwise put this information to use in or for the community in collaboration with those who contributed. Read More

2016Oct
Authors: Demitri Muna, Michael Alexander, Alice Allen, Richard Ashley, Daniel Asmus, Ruyman Azzollini, Michele Bannister, Rachael Beaton, Andrew Benson, G. Bruce Berriman, Maciej Bilicki, Peter Boyce, Joanna Bridge, Jan Cami, Eryn Cangi, Xian Chen, Nicholas Christiny, Christopher Clark, Michelle Collins, Johan Comparat, Neil Cook, Darren Croton, Isak Delberth Davids, Éric Depagne, John Donor, Leonardo A. dos Santos, Stephanie Douglas, Alan Du, Meredith Durbin, Dawn Erb, Daniel Faes, J. G. Fernández-Trincado, Anthony Foley, Sotiria Fotopoulou, Søren Frimann, Peter Frinchaboy, Rafael Garcia-Dias, Artur Gawryszczak, Elizabeth George, Sebastian Gonzalez, Karl Gordon, Nicholas Gorgone, Catherine Gosmeyer, Katie Grasha, Perry Greenfield, Rebekka Grellmann, James Guillochon, Mark Gurwell, Marcel Haas, Alex Hagen, Daryl Haggard, Tim Haines, Patrick Hall, Wojciech Hellwing, Edmund Christian Herenz, Samuel Hinton, Renee Hlozek, John Hoffman, Derek Holman, Benne Willem Holwerda, Anthony Horton, Cameron Hummels, Daniel Jacobs, Jens Juel Jensen, David Jones, Arna Karick, Luke Kelley, Matthew Kenworthy, Ben Kitchener, Dominik Klaes, Saul Kohn, Piotr Konorski, Coleman Krawczyk, Kyler Kuehn, Teet Kuutma, Michael T. Lam, Richard Lane, Jochen Liske, Diego Lopez-Camara, Katherine Mack, Sam Mangham, Qingqing Mao, David J. E. Marsh, Cecilia Mateu, Loïc Maurin, James McCormac, Ivelina Momcheva, Hektor Monteiro, Michael Mueller, Roberto Munoz, Rohan Naidu, Nicholas Nelson, Christian Nitschelm, Chris North, Juan Nunez-Iglesias, Sara Ogaz, Russell Owen, John Parejko, Vera Patrício, Joshua Pepper, Marshall Perrin, Timothy Pickering, Jennifer Piscionere, Richard Pogge, Radek Poleski, Alkistis Pourtsidou, Adrian M. Price-Whelan, Meredith L. Rawls, Shaun Read, Glen Rees, Hanno Rein, Thomas Rice, Signe Riemer-Sørensen, Naum Rusomarov, Sebastian F. Sanchez, Miguel Santander-García, Gal Sarid, William Schoenell, Aleks Scholz, Robert L. Schuhmann, William Schuster, Peter Scicluna, Marja Seidel, Lijing Shao, Pranav Sharma, Aleksandar Shulevski, David Shupe, Cristóbal Sifón, Brooke Simmons, Manodeep Sinha, Ian Skillen, Bjoern Soergel, Thomas Spriggs, Sundar Srinivasan, Abigail Stevens, Ole Streicher, Eric Suchyta, Joshua Tan, O. Grace Telford, Romain Thomas, Chiara Tonini, Grant Tremblay, Sarah Tuttle, Tanya Urrutia, Sam Vaughan, Miguel Verdugo, Alexander Wagner, Josh Walawender, Andrew Wetzel, Kyle Willett, Peter K. G. Williams, Guang Yang, Guangtun Zhu, Andrea Zonca

The Astropy Project (http://astropy.org) is, in its own words, "a community effort to develop a single core package for Astronomy in Python and foster interoperability between Python astronomy packages." For five years this project has been managed, written, and operated as a grassroots, self-organized, almost entirely volunteer effort while the software is used by the majority of the astronomical community. Read More

This paper describes how the Keck Observatory Archive (KOA) is extending open source software components to develop new services. In August 2015, KOA deployed a program interface to discover public data from all instruments equipped with an imaging mode. The interface complies with version 2 of the Simple Imaging Access Protocol (SIAP), under development by the International Virtual Observatory Alliance (IVOA), which defines a standard mechanism for discovering images through spatial queries. Read More

The scientific computing landscape has evolved dramatically in the past few years, with new schemes for organizing and storing data that reflect the growth in size and complexity of astronomical data sets. In response to this changing landscape, we are, over the next two years, deploying the next generation of the Montage toolkit ([ascl:1010.036]). Read More

The past year has seen movement on several fronts for improving software citation, including the Center for Open Science's Transparency and Openness Promotion (TOP) Guidelines, the Software Publishing Special Interest Group that was started at January's AAS meeting in Seattle at the request of that organization's Working Group on Astronomical Software, a Sloan-sponsored meeting at GitHub in San Francisco to begin work on a cohesive research software citation-enabling platform, the work of Force11 to "transform and improve" research communication, and WSSSPE's ongoing efforts that include software publication, citation, credit, and sustainability. Brief reports on these efforts were shared at the BoF, after which participants discussed ideas for improving software citation, generating a list of recommendations to the community of software authors, journal publishers, ADS, and research authors. The discussion, recommendations, and feedback will help form recommendations for software citation to those publishers represented in the Software Publishing Special Interest Group and the broader community. Read More

We present and make publicly available the first data release (DR1) of the Keck Observatory Database of Ionized Absorption toward Quasars (KODIAQ) survey. The KODIAQ survey is aimed at studying galactic and circumgalactic gas in absorption at high-redshift, with a focus on highly-ionized gas traced by OVI, using the HIRES spectrograph on the Keck-I telescope. KODIAQ DR1 consists of a fully-reduced sample of 170 quasars at 0. Read More

The U.S. Virtual Astronomical Observatory was a software infrastructure and development project designed both to begin the establishment of an operational Virtual Observatory (VO) and to provide the U. Read More

The Flexible Image Transport System (FITS) standard has been a great boon to astronomy, allowing observatories, scientists and the public to exchange astronomical information easily. The FITS standard is, however, showing its age. Developed in the late 1970s the FITS authors made a number of implementation choices for the format that, while common at the time, are now seen to limit its utility with modern data. Read More

The Flexible Image Transport System (FITS) standard has been a great boon to astronomy, allowing observatories, scientists and the public to exchange astronomical information easily. The FITS standard, however, is showing its age. Developed in the late 1970s, the FITS authors made a number of implementation choices that, while common at the time, are now seen to limit its utility with modern data. Read More

The Astrophysics Source Code Library (ASCL; ascl.net) is a free online registry of codes used in astronomy research; it currently contains over 900 codes and is indexed by ADS. The ASCL has recently moved a new infrastructure into production. Read More

2014Aug
Affiliations: 1W. M. Keck Observatory, Kamuela, HI, USA, 2W. M. Keck Observatory, Kamuela, HI, USA, 3W. M. Keck Observatory, Kamuela, HI, USA, 4W. M. Keck Observatory, Kamuela, HI, USA, 5NASA Exoplanet Science Institute, Pasadena, CA, 6NASA Exoplanet Science Institute, Pasadena, CA, 7NASA Exoplanet Science Institute, Pasadena, CA, 8NASA Exoplanet Science Institute, Pasadena, CA, 9NASA Exoplanet Science Institute, Pasadena, CA

A collaboration between the W. M. Keck Observatory (WMKO) in Hawaii and the NASA Exoplanet Science Institute (NExScI) in California, the Keck Observatory Archive (KOA) was commissioned in 2004 to archive observing data from WMKO, which operates two classically scheduled 10 m ground-based telescopes. Read More

This paper describes by example how astronomers can use cloud-computing resources offered by Amazon Web Services (AWS) to create new datasets at scale. We have created from existing surveys an atlas of the Galactic Plane at 16 wavelengths from 1 {\mu}m to 24 {\mu}m with pixels co-registered at spatial sampling of 1 arcsec. We explain how open source tools support management and operation of a virtual cluster on AWS platforms to process data at scale, and describe the technical issues that users will need to consider, such as optimization of resources, resource costs, and management of virtual machine instances. Read More

We describe the contents and functionality of the NASA Exoplanet Archive, a database and tool set funded by NASA to support astronomers in the exoplanet community. The current content of the database includes interactive tables containing properties of all published exoplanets, Kepler planet candidates, threshold-crossing events, data validation reports and target stellar parameters, light curves from the Kepler and CoRoT missions and from several ground-based surveys, and spectra and radial velocity measurements from the literature. Tools provided to work with these data include a transit ephemeris predictor, both for single planets and for observing locations, light curve viewing and normalization utilities, and a periodogram and phased light curve service. Read More

The NASA Exoplanet Science Institute (NExScI) hosts the annual Sagan Workshops, thematic meetings aimed at introducing researchers to the latest tools and methodologies in exoplanet research. The theme of the Summer 2012 workshop, held from July 23 to July 27 at Caltech, was to explore the use of exoplanet light curves to study planetary system architectures and atmospheres. A major part of the workshop was to use hands-on sessions to instruct attendees in the use of three open source tools for the analysis of light curves, especially from the Kepler mission. Read More

Operation of the US Virtual Astronomical Observatory shares some issues with modern physical observatories, e.g., intimidating data volumes and rapid technological change, and must also address unique concerns like the lack of direct control of the underlying and scattered data resources, and the distributed nature of the observatory itself. Read More

The Virtual Observatory (VO) is realizing global electronic integration of astronomy data. One of the long-term goals of the U.S. Read More

The field of astronomy is starting to generate more data than can be managed, served and processed by current techniques. This paper has outlined practices for developing next-generation tools and techniques for surviving this data tsunami, including rigorous evaluation of new technologies, partnerships between astronomers and computer scientists, and training of scientists in high-end software engineering engineering skills. Read More

2011Jul
Affiliations: 1NASA Exoplanet Science Institute, Infrared Processing and Analysis Center, California Institute of Technology, 2NASA Exoplanet Science Institute, Infrared Processing and Analysis Center, California Institute of Technology, 3NASA Exoplanet Science Institute, Infrared Processing and Analysis Center, California Institute of Technology, 4NASA Exoplanet Science Institute, Infrared Processing and Analysis Center, California Institute of Technology, 5NASA Exoplanet Science Institute, Infrared Processing and Analysis Center, California Institute of Technology, 6NASA Exoplanet Science Institute, Infrared Processing and Analysis Center, California Institute of Technology, 7NASA Exoplanet Science Institute, Infrared Processing and Analysis Center, California Institute of Technology, 8NASA Exoplanet Science Institute, Infrared Processing and Analysis Center, California Institute of Technology, 9NASA Exoplanet Science Institute, Infrared Processing and Analysis Center, California Institute of Technology, 10NASA Exoplanet Science Institute, Infrared Processing and Analysis Center, California Institute of Technology, 11NASA Exoplanet Science Institute, Infrared Processing and Analysis Center, California Institute of Technology, 12NASA Exoplanet Science Institute, Infrared Processing and Analysis Center, California Institute of Technology, 13NASA Exoplanet Science Institute, Infrared Processing and Analysis Center, California Institute of Technology, 14NASA Exoplanet Science Institute, Infrared Processing and Analysis Center, California Institute of Technology, 15NASA Exoplanet Science Institute, Infrared Processing and Analysis Center, California Institute of Technology, 16NASA Exoplanet Science Institute, Infrared Processing and Analysis Center, California Institute of Technology, 17NASA Exoplanet Science Institute, Infrared Processing and Analysis Center, California Institute of Technology, 18NASA Exoplanet Science Institute, Infrared Processing and Analysis Center, California Institute of Technology, 19NASA Exoplanet Science Institute, Infrared Processing and Analysis Center, California Institute of Technology, 20NASA Exoplanet Science Institute, Infrared Processing and Analysis Center, California Institute of Technology

As part of the NASA-CNES agreement, the NASA Star and Exoplanet Database (NStED) serves as the official US portal for the public CoRoT data products. NStED is a general purpose archive with the aim of providing support for NASA's planet finding and characterization goals. Consequently, the NASA Exoplanet Science Institute (NExScI) developed, and NStED adapted, a periodogram service for CoRoT data to determine periods of variability phenomena and create phased photometric light curves. Read More

We present the completion of a program to cross-correlate the SDSS Data Release 1 and 2MASS Point Source Catalog in search for extremely red L and T dwarfs. The program was initiated by Metchev and collaborators, who presented the findings on all newly identified T dwarfs in SDSS DR1, and estimated the space density of isolated T0--T8 dwarfs in the solar neighbourhood. In the current work we present most of the L dwarf discoveries. Read More

This chapter describes how astronomical imaging survey data have become a vital part of modern astronomy, how these data are archived and then served to the astronomical community through on-line data access portals. The Virtual Observatory, now under development, aims to make all these data accessible through a uniform set of interfaces. This chapter also describes the scientific need for one common image processing task, that of composing individual images into large scale mosaics and introduces Montage as a tool for this task. Read More

Cloud computing is a powerful new technology that is widely used in the business world. Recently, we have been investigating the benefits it offers to scientific computing. We have used three workflow applications to compare the performance of processing data on the Amazon EC2 cloud with the performance on the Abe high-performance cluster at the National Center for Supercomputing Applications (NCSA). Read More

We have used the Montage image mosaic engine to investigate the cost and performance of processing images on the Amazon EC2 cloud, and to inform the requirements that higher-level products impose on provenance management technologies. We will present a detailed comparison of the performance of Montage on the cloud and on the Abe high performance cluster at the National Center for Supercomputing Applications (NCSA). Because Montage generates many intermediate products, we have used it to understand the science requirements that higher-level products impose on provenance management technologies. Read More

Montage is a portable software toolkit for constructing custom, science-grade mosaics by composing multiple astronomical images. The mosaics constructed by Montage preserve the astrometry (position) and photometry (intensity) of the sources in the input images. The mosaic to be constructed is specified by the user in terms of a set of parameters, including dataset and wavelength to be used, location and size on the sky, coordinate system and projection, and spatial sampling rate. Read More

The availability of vast quantities of data through electronic archives has transformed astronomical research. It has also enabled the creation of new products, models and simulations, often from distributed input data and models, that are themselves made electronically available. These products will only provide maximal long-term value to astronomers when accompanied by records of their provenance; that is, records of the data and processes used in the creation of such products. Read More

* Aims. We describe here the main functionalities of the LAEX (Laboratorio de Astrofisica Estelar y Exoplanetas/Laboratory for Stellar Astrophysics and Exoplanets) and NASA portals for CoRoT Public Data. The CoRoT archive at LAEX was opened to the community in January 2009 and is managed in the framework of the Spanish Virtual Observatory. Read More

2009Mar
Affiliations: 1California Institute of Technology;, 2California Institute of Technology;, 3California Institute of Technology;, 4California Institute of Technology;, 5California Institute of Technology;, 6California Institute of Technology;, 7California Institute of Technology;, 8California Institute of Technology;, 9California Institute of Technology;, 10California Institute of Technology;, 11California Institute of Technology;, 12California Institute of Technology;, 13California Institute of Technology;, 14California Institute of Technology;, 15California Institute of Technology;, 16California Institute of Technology;, 17California Institute of Technology;

The NASA/IPAC/NExScI Star and Exoplanet Database (NStED) is a general purpose stellar archive which supports NASA planet-finding and planet-characterization goals, stellar astrophysics, and the planning of NASA and other space missions. There are two principal components of NStED: a database of 140,000 nearby stars and exoplanet-hosting stars, and an archive dedicated to high precision photometric surveys for transiting exoplanets (NStED-ETSS). We present summaries of these components. Read More

The NASA Star and Exoplanet Database (NStED) is a general purpose stellar archive with the aim of providing support for NASA's planet finding and characterization goals, stellar astrophysics, and the planning of NASA and other space missions. There are two principal components of NStED: a database of (currently) 140,000 nearby stars and exoplanet-hosting stars, and an archive dedicated to high precision photometric surveys for transiting exoplanets. We present a summary of the NStED stellar database, functionality, tools, and user interface. Read More

2008Jun
Affiliations: 1Michelson Science Center;, 2Infrared Processing and Analysis Center;, 3Infrared Processing and Analysis Center;, 4Infrared Processing and Analysis Center;, 5Michelson Science Center;, 6Infrared Processing and Analysis Center;, 7Michelson Science Center;, 8Infrared Processing and Analysis Center;, 9Michelson Science Center;, 10Infrared Processing and Analysis Center;, 11Infrared Processing and Analysis Center;, 12Infrared Processing and Analysis Center;, 13Michelson Science Center;, 14Infrared Processing and Analysis Center;, 15Infrared Processing and Analysis Center;, 16Spitzer Science Center;, 17Michelson Science Center;, 18Infrared Processing and Analysis Center;
Category: Astrophysics

The NASA Star and Exoplanet Database (NStED) is a general purpose stellar archive with the aim of providing support for NASA's planet finding and characterization goals, stellar astrophysics, and the planning of NASA and other space missions. There are two principal components of NStED: a database of (currently) 140,000 nearby stars and exoplanet-hosting stars, and an archive dedicated to high-precision photometric surveys for transiting exoplanets. We present a summary of the latter component: the NStED Exoplanet Transit Survey Service (NStED-ETSS), along with its content, functionality, tools, and user interface. Read More

We report new L and T dwarfs found in a cross-match of the SDSS Data Release 1 and 2MASS. Our simultaneous search of the two databases effectively allows us to relax the criteria for object detection in either survey and to explore the combined databases to a greater completeness level. We find two new T dwarfs in addition to the 13 already known in the SDSS DR1 footprint. Read More

2003Sep
Affiliations: 1The Pennsylvania State University, 2The Pennsylvania State University, 3IPAC, Caltech
Category: Astrophysics

Utilizing the Two Micron All Sky Survey (2MASS) All-Sky Data Release Catalog, we have retrieved useful near-IR J, H, and Ks magnitudes for more than 800 hot subdwarfs (sdO and sdB stars) drawn from the "Catalogue of Spectroscopically Identified Hot Subdwarfs" (Kilkenny, Heber, & Drilling 1988, 1992). This sample size greatly exceeds previous studies of hot subdwarfs. We find that, of the hot subdwarfs in Kilkenny et al. Read More