Fabrizio Tavecchio - INAF National Institute for Astrophysics, Rome

Fabrizio Tavecchio
Are you Fabrizio Tavecchio?

Claim your profile, edit publications, add additional information:

Contact Details

Name
Fabrizio Tavecchio
Affiliation
INAF National Institute for Astrophysics, Rome
City
Rome
Country
Italy

Pubs By Year

External Links

Pub Categories

 
High Energy Astrophysical Phenomena (24)
 
Cosmology and Nongalactic Astrophysics (14)
 
Astrophysics (9)
 
High Energy Physics - Phenomenology (3)
 
Astrophysics of Galaxies (3)
 
Solar and Stellar Astrophysics (2)
 
Instrumentation and Methods for Astrophysics (2)
 
Nuclear Experiment (1)

Publications Authored By Fabrizio Tavecchio

In an effort to understand the cause of the apparent depletion in the number density of radio-loud AGNs at $z>3$, this work investigates the viability of the so-called Cosmic Microwave Background (CMB) quenching mechanism of intrinsically jetted, high-z AGNs, whereby Inverse Compton scattering of CMB photons off electrons within the extended lobes results in a substantial dimming of the lobe synchrotron emission at GHz frequencies, while simultaneously boosting their diffuse X-ray signal. We focus on five $z>3.5$ radio galaxies that have sufficiently deep Chandra exposure (> 50 ks) to warrant a meaningful investigation of any extended X-ray emission. Read More

2016Nov
Affiliations: 1IAR, Buenos Aires, Argentina, 2NWU, Potchefstroom, South Africa, 3University of Amsterdam, The Netherlands, 4INAF, Merate, Italy

Collimated outflows (jets) appear to be a ubiquitous phenomenon associated with the accretion of material onto a compact object. Despite this ubiquity, many fundamental physics aspects of jets are still poorly understood and constrained. These include the mechanism of launching and accelerating jets, the connection between these processes and the nature of the accretion flow, and the role of magnetic fields; the physics responsible for the collimation of jets over tens of thousands to even millions of gravitational radii of the central accreting object; the matter content of jets; the location of the region(s) accelerating particles to TeV (possibly even PeV and EeV) energies (as evidenced by gamma-ray emission observed from many jet sources) and the physical processes responsible for this particle acceleration; the radiative processes giving rise to the observed multi-wavelength emission; and the topology of magnetic fields and their role in the jet collimation and particle acceleration processes. Read More

2016Nov
Affiliations: 1on behalf of the e-ASTROGAM Collaboration, 2on behalf of the e-ASTROGAM Collaboration, 3on behalf of the e-ASTROGAM Collaboration, 4on behalf of the e-ASTROGAM Collaboration, 5on behalf of the e-ASTROGAM Collaboration, 6on behalf of the e-ASTROGAM Collaboration, 7on behalf of the e-ASTROGAM Collaboration, 8on behalf of the e-ASTROGAM Collaboration, 9on behalf of the e-ASTROGAM Collaboration, 10on behalf of the e-ASTROGAM Collaboration, 11on behalf of the e-ASTROGAM Collaboration, 12on behalf of the e-ASTROGAM Collaboration, 13on behalf of the e-ASTROGAM Collaboration, 14on behalf of the e-ASTROGAM Collaboration, 15on behalf of the e-ASTROGAM Collaboration, 16on behalf of the e-ASTROGAM Collaboration, 17on behalf of the e-ASTROGAM Collaboration, 18on behalf of the e-ASTROGAM Collaboration, 19on behalf of the e-ASTROGAM Collaboration, 20on behalf of the e-ASTROGAM Collaboration, 21on behalf of the e-ASTROGAM Collaboration, 22on behalf of the e-ASTROGAM Collaboration, 23on behalf of the e-ASTROGAM Collaboration, 24on behalf of the e-ASTROGAM Collaboration, 25on behalf of the e-ASTROGAM Collaboration, 26on behalf of the e-ASTROGAM Collaboration, 27on behalf of the e-ASTROGAM Collaboration, 28on behalf of the e-ASTROGAM Collaboration, 29on behalf of the e-ASTROGAM Collaboration, 30on behalf of the e-ASTROGAM Collaboration, 31on behalf of the e-ASTROGAM Collaboration, 32on behalf of the e-ASTROGAM Collaboration, 33on behalf of the e-ASTROGAM Collaboration, 34on behalf of the e-ASTROGAM Collaboration, 35on behalf of the e-ASTROGAM Collaboration, 36on behalf of the e-ASTROGAM Collaboration, 37on behalf of the e-ASTROGAM Collaboration, 38on behalf of the e-ASTROGAM Collaboration, 39on behalf of the e-ASTROGAM Collaboration, 40on behalf of the e-ASTROGAM Collaboration, 41on behalf of the e-ASTROGAM Collaboration, 42on behalf of the e-ASTROGAM Collaboration, 43on behalf of the e-ASTROGAM Collaboration, 44on behalf of the e-ASTROGAM Collaboration, 45on behalf of the e-ASTROGAM Collaboration, 46on behalf of the e-ASTROGAM Collaboration, 47on behalf of the e-ASTROGAM Collaboration, 48on behalf of the e-ASTROGAM Collaboration, 49on behalf of the e-ASTROGAM Collaboration, 50on behalf of the e-ASTROGAM Collaboration, 51on behalf of the e-ASTROGAM Collaboration, 52on behalf of the e-ASTROGAM Collaboration, 53on behalf of the e-ASTROGAM Collaboration, 54on behalf of the e-ASTROGAM Collaboration, 55on behalf of the e-ASTROGAM Collaboration, 56on behalf of the e-ASTROGAM Collaboration, 57on behalf of the e-ASTROGAM Collaboration, 58on behalf of the e-ASTROGAM Collaboration, 59on behalf of the e-ASTROGAM Collaboration, 60on behalf of the e-ASTROGAM Collaboration, 61on behalf of the e-ASTROGAM Collaboration, 62on behalf of the e-ASTROGAM Collaboration, 63on behalf of the e-ASTROGAM Collaboration, 64on behalf of the e-ASTROGAM Collaboration, 65on behalf of the e-ASTROGAM Collaboration, 66on behalf of the e-ASTROGAM Collaboration, 67on behalf of the e-ASTROGAM Collaboration, 68on behalf of the e-ASTROGAM Collaboration, 69on behalf of the e-ASTROGAM Collaboration, 70on behalf of the e-ASTROGAM Collaboration

e-ASTROGAM (`enhanced ASTROGAM') is a breakthrough Observatory mission dedicated to the study of the non-thermal Universe in the photon energy range from 0.3 MeV to 3 GeV. The mission is based on an advanced space-proven detector technology, with unprecedented sensitivity, angular and energy resolution, combined with polarimetric capability. Read More

One of the most outstanding results of the Chandra X-ray Observatory was the discovery that AGN jets are bright X-ray emitters on very large scales, up to hundreds of kpc. Of these, the powerful and beamed jets of Flat Spectrum Radio Quasars are particularly interesting, as the X-ray emission cannot be explained by an extrapolation of the lower frequency synchrotron spectrum. Instead, the most common model invokes inverse Compton scattering of photons of the Cosmic Microwave Background (EC/CMB) as the mechanism responsible for the high energy emission. Read More

It has been proposed that blazar jets are structured, with a fast spine surrounded by a slower sheath or layer. This structured jet model explains some properties of their emission and morphology. Because of their relative motion, the radiation produced by one component is seen amplified by the other, thus enhancing the inverse Compton emission of both. Read More

We analyze Chandra X-ray images of a sample of 11 quasars that are known to contain kiloparsec scale radio jets. The sample consists of five high-redshift (z >= 3.6) flat-spectrum radio quasars, and six intermediate redshift (2. Read More

The origin of the high-energy flux of neutrinos detected by IceCube is still unknown. Recent works report the evidence for a possible positional correlation between the reconstructed neutrino arrival directions and the positions in the sky of low power, high-energy emitting BL Lac objects (HBL). Assuming that $\gamma$-ray emitting HBL form the bulk of the sources of high-energy neutrinos above 100 TeV, we intend to calculate the number of events expected to be detected for each source by IceCube and KM3NeT. Read More

High energy observations of extreme BL Lac objects, such as 1ES 0229+200 or 1ES 0347-121, recently focused interest both for blazar and jet physics and for the implication on the extragalactic background light and intergalactic magnetic field estimate. However, the number of these extreme highly peaked BL Lac objects (EHBL) is still rather small. Aiming at increase their number, we selected a group of EHBL candidates starting from the BL Lac sample of Plotkin et al. Read More

Flat spectrum radio quasars (FSRQs) are a particular class of blazars rich of optical/ultraviolet photons inside the broad line region (BLR), necessarily implying a huge optical depth for $\gamma$ rays above 20 GeV. As a consequence, photons with energy above such a threshold should not be emitted. However, photons in the energy range 70 - 400 GeV have been observed by MAGIC from the FSRQ PKS 1222+216. Read More

The idea that photons can convert into axion-like particles (ALPs) $\gamma \to a$ in or around an AGN and reconvert back into photons $a \to \gamma$ in the Milky Way magnetic field has been put forward in 2008 and has recently attracted growing interest. Yet, so far nobody has estimated the conversion probability $\gamma \to a$ as carefully as allowed by present-day knowledge. Our aim is to fill this gap. Read More

In this paper we propose a way to use optical polarisation observations to provide independent constraints and guide to the modelling of the spectral energy distribution (SED) of blazars, which is particularly useful when two-zone models are required to fit the observed SED. As an example, we apply the method to the 2008 multiwavelength campaign of PKS 2155-304, for which the required polarisation information was already available. We find this approach succesful in being able to simultaneously describe the SED and variability of the source, otherwise difficult to interpret. Read More

The peculiar high-energy emission spectrum of the so-called extreme BL Lacs (EHBL) challenges the standard emission models of blazars. Among the possible solutions, the so-called hadronic cascade scenario assumes that the observed high-energy radiation is produced in the intergalactic space through photo-hadronic reactions by ultra-high energy cosmic rays (UHECR) with energies up to $10^{19-20}$ eV beamed by the blazar jet. Under the assumption -- implicit in this model -- that the intrinsic high-energy synchrotron-self Compton emission of the blazar does not substantially contribute to the observed $\gamma$-ray spectrum, we derive constraints to the basic physical quantities of the jet and we compare them with the requirements of the hadronic cascade scenario. Read More

One of the mysteries of very-high-energy (VHE) astrophysics is the observation of flat spectrum radio quasars (FSRQs) above about 30 GeV, because at those energies their broad line region should prevent photons produced by the central engine to escape. Although a few astrophysical explanations have been put forward, they are totally ad hoc. We show that a natural explanation emerges within the conventional models of FSRQs provided that photon-ALP oscillations take place inside the source for the model parameters within an allowed range. Read More

2013Sep
Authors: Paolo Soffitta, Xavier Barcons, Ronaldo Bellazzini, João Braga, Enrico Costa, George W. Fraser, Szymon Gburek, Juhani Huovelin, Giorgio Matt, Mark Pearce, Juri Poutanen, Victor Reglero, Andrea Santangelo, Rashid A. Sunyaev, Gianpiero Tagliaferri, Martin Weisskopf, Roberto Aloisio, Elena Amato, Primo Attiná, Magnus Axelsson, Luca Baldini, Stefano Basso, Stefano Bianchi, Pasquale Blasi, Johan Bregeon, Alessandro Brez, Niccoló Bucciantini, Luciano Burderi, Vadim Burwitz, Piergiorgio Casella, Eugene Churazov, Marta Civitani, Stefano Covino, Rui Miguel Curado da Silva, Giancarlo Cusumano, Mauro Dadina, Flavio D'Amico, Alessandra De Rosa, Sergio Di Cosimo, Giuseppe Di Persio, Tiziana Di Salvo, Michal Dovciak, Ronald Elsner, Chris J. Eyles, Andrew C. Fabian, Sergio Fabiani, Hua Feng, Salvatore Giarrusso, René W. Goosmann, Paola Grandi, Nicolas Grosso, Gianluca Israel, Miranda Jackson, Philip Kaaret, Vladimir Karas, Michael Kuss, Dong Lai, Giovanni La Rosa, Josefin Larsson, Stefan Larsson, Luca Latronico, Antonio Maggio, Jorge Maia, Frédéric Marin, Marco Maria Massai, Teresa Mineo, Massimo Minuti, Elena Moretti, Fabio Muleri, Stephen L. O'Dell, Giovanni Pareschi, Giovanni Peres, Melissa Pesce, Pierre-Olivier Petrucci, Michele Pinchera, Delphine Porquet, Brian Ramsey, Nanda Rea, Fabio Reale, Juana Maria Rodrigo, Agata Różańska, Alda Rubini, Pawel Rudawy, Felix Ryde, Marco Salvati, Valdivino Alexandre de Santiago Júnior, Sergey Sazonov, Carmelo Sgró, Eric Silver, Gloria Spandre, Daniele Spiga, Luigi Stella, Toru Tamagawa, Francesco Tamborra, Fabrizio Tavecchio, Teresa Teixeira Dias, Matthew van Adelsberg, Kinwah Wu, Silvia Zane

X-ray polarimetry, sometimes alone, and sometimes coupled to spectral and temporal variability measurements and to imaging, allows a wealth of physical phenomena in astrophysics to be studied. X-ray polarimetry investigates the acceleration process, for example, including those typical of magnetic reconnection in solar flares, but also emission in the strong magnetic fields of neutron stars and white dwarfs. It detects scattering in asymmetric structures such as accretion disks and columns, and in the so-called molecular torus and ionization cones. Read More

We study the variation of the broad-band spectral energy distribution (SED) of the BL Lac object Mrk 501 as a function of source activity, from quiescent to flaring. Through chi-square-minimization we model eight simultaneous SED datasets with a one-zone Synchrotron-Self-Compton (SSC) model, and examine how model parameters vary with source activity. The emerging variability pattern of Mrk 501 is complex, with the Compton component arising from gamma-electron scatterings that sometimes are (mostly) Thomson and sometimes (mostly) extreme Klein-Nishina. Read More

Aims: The determination of elusive redshifts of bright BL Lac objects Methods: We use the capabilities of newly available spectrograph X-Shooter at European Southern Observatory (ESO) Very Large Telescope, that combines high resolution and a large wavelength range, to obtain UVB to near-IR spectra of BL Lacs. Results: Our observations of PKS 0048-097 detect three emission lines that permit to derive a redshift z = 0.635. Read More

We report the variation of the spectral energy distribution (SED) of blazars as a function of source activity, based on available, simultaneous multi-wavelength (MWL) observations of BL Lac objects. We use a fully automatized \c{hi}2 minimization procedure, instead of the commonly used eye-ball fit, to model the data sets with a one-zone Synchrotron-Self-Compton (SSC) model. The obtained SSC parameters are then analyzed as a function of source luminosity, and the correlation between parameters is shown. Read More

We introduce a new method to determine the redshift of unknown-redshift BL Lac Objects. The method relies on simultaneous multi-wavelength (MWL) observations of BL Lac objects in optical, X-ray, HE (E>100 MeV) gamma-rays and VHE (E>100 GeV)gamma-rays. It involves best-fitting spectral energy distribution (SED) from optical through HE gamma-rays with a Synchrotron-Self-Compton (SSC) model. Read More

Context. Blazars are radio-loud active galactic nuclei (AGN) with a jet pointing at small angles towards the observer. The overall emitted spectrum is typically non-thermal, and in some cases the emission and/or absorption lines are so faint as to prevent the determination of the redshift based on optical spectroscopy methods. Read More

2011Sep
Affiliations: 1Instituto de Astrofísica de Canarias, 2University of Rijeka, 3INAF National Institute for Astrophysics, Rome, 4University of Rijeka

We present the results of a long M87 monitoring campaign in very high energy $\gamma$-rays with the MAGIC-I Cherenkov telescope. A total of 150 hours of data was gathered between 2005 and 2007. No flaring activity was found during that time. Read More

For the high-frequency peaked BL Lac object Mrk 421 we study the variation of the spectral energy distribution (SED) as a function of source activity, from quiescent to active. We use a fully automatized chi-squared minimization procedure, instead of the "eyeball" procedure more commonly used in the literature, to model nine SED datasets with a one-zone Synchrotron-Self-Compton (SSC) model and examine how the model parameters vary with source activity. The latter issue can finally be addressed now, because simultaneous broad-band SEDs (spanning from optical to VHE photon energies) have finally become available. Read More

Recently, a new method to constrain the distance of blazars with unknown redshift using combined observations in the GeV and TeV regimes has been developed, with the underlying assumption that the Very High Energy (VHE) spectrum corrected for the absorption of TeV photons by the Extragalactic Background Light (EBL) via photon-photon interaction should still be softer than the gamma-ray spectrum observed by Fermi/LAT. The constraints found are related to the real redshifts by a simple linear relation, that has been used to infer the unknown distance of blazars. The sample will be revised with the up-to-date spectra in both TeV and GeV bands, the method tested with the more recent EBL models and finally applied to the unknown distance blazars detected at VHE. Read More

A new method to constrain the distance of blazars with unknown redshift using combined observations in the GeV and TeV regimes will be presented. The underlying assumption is that the Very High Energy (VHE) spectrum corrected for the absorption of TeV photons by the Extragalactic Background Light (EBL) via photon-photon interaction should still be softer than the extrapolation of the gamma-ray spectrum observed by Fermi/LAT. Starting from the observed spectral data at VHE, the EBL-corrected spectra are derived as a function of the redshift z and fitted with power laws. Read More

The Extragalactic Background Light (EBL) is the integrated light from all the stars that have ever formed, and spans the IR-UV range. The interaction of very-high-energy (VHE: E>100 GeV) gamma-rays, emitted by sources located at cosmological distances, with the intervening EBL results in electron-positron pair production that leads to energy-dependent attenuation of the observed VHE flux. This introduces a fundamental ambiguity in the interpretation of measured VHE gamma-ray spectra: neither the intrinsic spectrum, nor the EBL, are separately known -- only their combination is. Read More

The Extragalactic Background Light (EBL) is the integrated light from all the stars that have ever formed, and spans the IR-UV range. The interaction of very-high-energy (VHE: E>100 GeV) gamma-rays, emitted by sources located at cosmological distances, with the intervening EBL results in electron-positron pair production that leads to energy-dependent attenuation of the observed VHE flux. This introduces a fundamental ambiguity in the interpretation of the measured VHE blazar spectra: neither the intrinsic spectra, nor the EBL, are separately known - only their combination is. Read More

2009Jul
Affiliations: 1for the MAGIC Collaboration, 2for the MAGIC Collaboration, 3for the MAGIC Collaboration, 4for the MAGIC Collaboration, 5for the MAGIC Collaboration

The MAGIC telescope observed the region around the distant blazar 3C 66A for 54.2 hr in 2007 August-December. The observations resulted in the discovery of a gamma-ray source centered at celestial coordinates R. Read More

The flat-spectrum radio-quasar 3C279 (z=0.536) is the most distant object detected at very high energy (VHE) gamma-rays. It is thus an important beacon for the study of the interaction of the VHE gamma-rays with the Extra-galactic Background Light (EBL). Read More

The HBL-type blazar Markarian 421 is one of the brightest TeV gamma-ray sources of the Northern sky. From December 2007 until June 2008 it was intensively observed in the VHE (E>100 GeV) band by the MAGIC gamma-ray telescope. The source showed intense and prolonged activity during the whole period. Read More

2008Nov
Affiliations: 1ISAS/JAXA, 2ISAS/JAXA, 3ISAS/JAXA, 4Tokyo Institute of Technology, 5KIPAC/Stanford University, 6Nicolaus Copernicus Astronomical Center, 7INAF-Osservatorio Astronomico di Brera, 8NASA/GSFC, 9KIPAC/Stanford University, 10Australia Telescope National Facility, 11Nordic Optical Telescope
Category: Astrophysics

We report the Suzaku observations of the high luminosity blazar SWIFT J0746.3+2548 (J0746) conducted in November 2005. This object, with z = 2. Read More

I review the current knowledge of high-energy emission from extragalctic jets. First I discuss gamma-ray emission from blazars, which provides us numerous precious information on the innermost portions of the relativistic jets. I describe the constraints on the dynamics of the jet from the subpc to the pc scale provided by recent VLBI studies of TeV sources, together with the modelling of the emission from the blazar jet. Read More

We reanalyze the XMM--Newton data of GRB 011211 showing that the spectral features, interpreted by Reeves et al. (2002, 2003) as due thermal emission from a collisionally ionized plasma, can be also reproduced by a reflection model (with ionization parameter $\xi\sim 10^2$). We discuss the implications of this interpretation, estimating the total mass required in the simplified case of a funnel geometry. Read More

The Chandra discovery of bright X-ray emission from kpc-scale jets provides us unprecedented insights into the physical state of the plasma in the flow. In particular it is possible to get good constraints on the power and pressure in bright knots. For a group of selected sources with blazar-type cores it is also possible to constrain the physical quantities of the jet at sub-pc scale. Read More

The XMM-Newton satellite has revealed extended X-ray emission from the eastern radio lobe of the Fanaroff-Riley II Radio Galaxy Pictor A. The X-ray spectrum, accumulated on a region covering about half the entire radio lobe, is well described by both a thermal model and a power law. The X-ray emission could be thermal and produced by circum-galactic gas shocked by the expanding radio lobe or, alternatively, by Inverse Compton (IC) of cosmic microwave background photons by relativistic electrons in the lobe. Read More

2002May
Affiliations: 1Osservatorio Astronomico di Brera, Milano, Italy, 2Osservatorio Astronomico di Brera, Milano, Italy
Category: Astrophysics

We discuss the relation between the power carried by relativistic jets and the nuclear power provided by accretion, for a group of blazars including FSRQs and BL Lac objects. They are characterized by good quality broad band X-ray data provided by the Beppo SAX satellite. The jet powers are estimated using physical parameters determined from uniformly modelling their spectral energy distributions (SEDs). Read More

2000Jul
Affiliations: 1OAB, Italy, 2OAB, Italy, 3OAB, Italy, 4OAB, Italy, 5OAL, Portugal
Category: Astrophysics

The bright X-ray selected BL Lac object 1ES1101--232 shows a flat X-ray spectrum, making it detectable with high statistics over the wide BeppoSAX energy range. We have observed it in two different epochs with BeppoSAX, and found a variation of the flux of about 30% that can be explained by a change in the spectral index above the synchrotron peak. We present here the data and infer limits on the strength of the magnetic field based on models of emission for High-frequency peaked BL Lacs. Read More

We fit the SEDs of the TeV blazar Mkn 501 adopting the homogeneous Synchrotron-Self Compton model to simultaneous X-ray and TeV spectra recently become available. We present detailed model spectra calculated with the above constraints and taking into account the absorption of TeV photons by the IR background. We found that the curved TeV spectra can be naturally reproduced even without IRB absorption. Read More

The BL Lac object Mkn 501 was observed with the BeppoSAX satellite at three epochs in April-May 1998, simultaneously with the Whipple and HEGRA Cherenkov telescopes. The X-ray spectrum is well detected up to 70 keV and it exhibits, at all epochs, a continuous curvature, which is here modeled with three power-laws of increasingly steeper index at larger energies. In the nu*f_nu representation the spectrum exhibits a peak at ~20 keV, which is interpreted as the maximum of the synchrotron emission. Read More