Donald Q. Lamb - University Chicago

Donald Q. Lamb
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Name
Donald Q. Lamb
Affiliation
University Chicago
City
Arlington
Country
United States

Pubs By Year

Pub Categories

 
Astrophysics (34)
 
Physics - Plasma Physics (4)
 
High Energy Astrophysical Phenomena (3)
 
Physics - Fluid Dynamics (1)
 
Nonlinear Sciences - Chaotic Dynamics (1)
 
Cosmology and Nongalactic Astrophysics (1)
 
Physics - Instrumentation and Detectors (1)
 
Astrophysics of Galaxies (1)
 
Solar and Stellar Astrophysics (1)

Publications Authored By Donald Q. Lamb

Proton radiography is an important diagnostic method for laser plasma experiments, and is particularly important in the analysis of magnetized plasmas. The theory of radiographic image analysis has heretofore only permitted somewhat limited analysis of the radiographs of such plasmas. We furnish here a theory that remedies this deficiency. Read More

We propose a new way of generating magnetized supersonic jets using a ring laser to irradiate a flat surface target. Using 2D FLASH code simulations which include the Biermann Battery term, we demonstrate that strong toroidal fields can be generated and sustained downstream in the collimated jet outflow far from the target surface. The field strength can be controlled by varying the ring laser separation, thereby providing a versatile laboratory platform for studying the effects of magnetic field in a variety of astrophysical settings. Read More

The Biermann Battery effect is frequently invoked in cosmic magnetogenesis and studied in High-Energy Density laboratory physics experiments. Generation of magnetic fields by the Biermann effect due to mis-aligned density and temperature gradients in smooth flow behind shocks is well known. We show that a Biermann-effect magnetic field is also generated within shocks. Read More

We explore Implicit Monte Carlo (IMC) and Discrete Diffusion Monte Carlo (DDMC) for radiation transport in high-velocity outflows with structured opacity. The IMC method is a stochastic computational technique for nonlinear radiation transport. IMC is partially implicit in time and may suffer in efficiency when tracking Monte Carlo particles through optically thick materials. Read More

The potential for laser-produced plasmas to yield fundamental insights into high energy density physics (HEDP) and deliver other useful applications can sometimes be frustrated by uncertainties in modeling the properties and expansion of these plasmas using radiation-hydrodynamics codes. In an effort to overcome this and to corroborate the accuracy of the HEDP capabilities recently added to the publicly available FLASH radiation-hydrodynamics code, we present detailed comparisons of FLASH results to new and previously published results from the HYDRA code used extensively at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory. We focus on two very different problems of interest: (1) an Aluminum slab irradiated by 15. Read More

We propose a robust, quantitative method to compare the synthetic light curves of a Type Ia Supernova (SNIa) explosion model with a large set of observed SNeIa, and derive a figure of merit for the explosion model's agreement with observations. The synthetic light curves are fit with the data-driven model SALT2 which returns values for stretch, color, and magnitude at peak brightness, as well as a goodness-of-fit parameter. Each fit is performed multiple times with different choices of filter bands and epoch range in order to quantify the systematic uncertainty on the fitted parameters. Read More

Supersonic plasma outflows driven by multi-beam, high-energy lasers, such as Omega and NIF, have been and will be used as platforms for a variety of laboratory astrophysics experiments. Here we propose a new way of launching high density and high velocity, plasma jets using multiple intense laser beams in a hollow ring formation. We show that such jets provide a more flexible and versatile platform for future laboratory astrophysics experiments. Read More

GRB 041006 was detected by HETE-2 at 12:18:08 UT on 06 October 2004. This GRB displays a soft X-ray emission, a precursor before the onset of the main event, and also a soft X-ray tail after the end of the main peak. The light curves in four different energy bands display different features; At higher energy bands several peaks are seen in the light curve, while at lower energy bands a single broader bump dominates. Read More

We performed high resolution numerical simulations of homogenous and isotropic compressible turbulence, with an average 3D Mach number close to 0.3. We study the statistical properties of intermittency for velocity, density and entropy. Read More

We present a theoretical study of double compact objects as potential short/hard gamma-ray burst (GRB) progenitors. An updated population synthesis code StarTrack is used to calculate properties of double neutron stars and black-hole neutron star binaries. We obtain their formation rates, estimate merger times and finally predict their most likely merger locations and afterglow properties for different types of host galaxies. Read More

We present the "C4 Cluster Catalog", a new sample of 748 clusters of galaxies identified in the spectroscopic sample of the Second Data Release (DR2) of the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS). The C4 cluster--finding algorithm identifies clusters as overdensities in a seven-dimensional position and color space, thus minimizing projection effects which plagued previous optical clusters selection. The present C4 catalog covers ~2600 square degrees of sky with groups containing 10 members to massive clusters having over 200 cluster members with redshifts. Read More

We report on the detection of an emission line near 1.3 keV, which we associate with blue-shifted hydrogen-like sulfur (S XVI), in a 76.8 ksec Chandra HETGS spectrum of the afterglow of GRB 020813. Read More

We describe a new method of transient point source localization for coded-aperture X-ray detectors that we have applied to data from the HETE Wide-Field X-Ray Monitor (WXM). The method is based upon the calculation of the likelihood function and its interpretation as a probability density for the transient source location by an application of Bayes' Theorem. The method gives a point estimate of the source location by finding the maximum of this probability density, and credible regions for the source location by choosing suitable contours of constant probability density. Read More

We show that the clumpy structure of star-forming regions can naturally explain the fact that 50-70% of GRB afterglows are optically ``dark.'' We also show that dust echos from the GRB and its afterglow, produced by the clumpy structure of the star-forming region in which the GRB occurs, can lead to temporal variability and peaks in the NIR, optical, and UV lightcurves of GRB afterglows. We note that the detection of GRB ``orphan'' afterglows would provide strong evidence that the star-forming regions in which GRBs occur are clumpy. Read More

We show that, if the long GRBs are produced by the collapse of massive stars, GRBs and their afterglows may provide a powerful probe of cosmology and the early universe. Read More

We exploit the 14 gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) with known redshifts $z$ and the 7 GRBs for which there are constraints on $z$ to determine the GRB rate $R_{\rm GRB}(z)$, using a method based on Bayesian inference. We find that, despite the qualitative differences between the observed GRB rate and estimates of the SFR in the universe, current data are consistent with $R_{\rm GRB}(z)$ being proportional to the SFR. Read More

We use the possible Cepheid-like luminosity estimator for the long-duration gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) developed by Reichart et al. (2000) to estimate the intrinsic luminosity, and thus the redshift, of 907 long-duration GRBs from the BATSE 4B catalog. We describe a method based on Bayesian inference which allows us to infer the intrinsic GRB burst rate as a function of redshift for bursts with estimated intrinsic luminosities and redshifts. Read More

2001Sep
Affiliations: 1Chicago, 2Caltech
Category: Astrophysics

We show that, if the long GRBs are produced by the collapse of massive stars, GRBs and their afterglows may provide a powerful probe of cosmology and the early universe. Read More

Wavelets are scaleable, oscillatory functions that deviate from zero only within a limited spatial regime and have average value zero. In addition to their use as source characterizers, wavelet functions are rapidly gaining currency within the source detection field. Wavelet-based source detection involves the correlation of scaled wavelet functions with binned, two-dimensional image data. Read More

We show that, if the long GRBs are produced by the collapse of massive stars, GRBs and their afterglows may provide a powerful probe of cosmology and the early universe. Read More

2001Jul

We exploit the 14 gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) with known redshifts z and the 7 GRBs for which there are constraints on z to determine the GRB rate R_{GRB}(z), using a method based on Bayesian inference. We find that, despite the qualitative differences between the observed GRB rate and estimates of the SFR in the universe, current data are consistent with R_{GRB}(z) being proportional to the SFR. Read More

2001Jul
Authors: Donald Q. Lamb1
Affiliations: 1Chicago
Category: Astrophysics

We show that the clumpy structure of star-forming regions can naturally explain the fact that 50-70% of GRB afterglows are optical``dark.'' We also show that dust echos from the GRB and its afterglow, produced by the clumpy structure of the star-forming region in which the GRB occurs, can lead to temporal variability and peaks in the NIR, optical, and UV lightcurves of GRB afterglows. Read More

We present a possible Cepheid-like luminosity estimator for the long-duration gamma-ray bursts based on the variability of their light curves. Read More

We present a possible Cepheid-like luminosity estimator for the long-duration gamma-ray bursts based on the variability of their light curves. We also present a preliminary application of this luminosity estimator to 907 long-duration bursts from the BATSE catalog. Read More

The discoveries that GRBs have X-ray, optical and radio afterglows have connected the study of GRBs to the rest of astronomy, and revolutionized the field. In this review, I discuss the implications that the observation of these afterglows have for burst energies and luminosities, and for models of the bursts and their afterglows. I describe recent evidence linking the long, softer, smoother GRBs detected by BeppoSAX and core collapse supernovae. Read More

We present a possible Cepheid-like luminosity estimator for the long gamma-ray bursts based on the variability of their light curves. To construct the luminosity estimator, we use CGRO/BATSE data for 13 bursts, Wind/KONUS data for 5 bursts, Ulysses/GRB data for 1 burst, and NEAR/XGRS data for 1 burst. Spectroscopic redshifts, peak fluxes, and high resolution light curves are available for 11 of these bursts; partial information is available for the remaining 9 bursts. Read More

2000Feb
Affiliations: 1University of Chicago, 2University of Chicago
Category: Astrophysics

There is increasingly strong evidence that gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) are associated with star-forming galaxies, and occur near or in the star-forming regions of these galaxies. These associations provide indirect evidence that at least the long GRBs detected by BeppoSAX are a result of the collapse of massive stars. The recent evidence that the light curves and the spectra of the afterglows of GRB 970228 and GRB 980326 appear to contain a supernova component, in addition to a relativistic shock wave component, provide more direct clues that this is the case. Read More

2000Feb
Affiliations: 1University of Chicago, 2University of Chicago
Category: Astrophysics

We show that, if many GRBs are indeed produced by the collapse of massive stars, GRBs and their afterglows provide a powerful probe of the very high redshift (z > 5) universe. Read More

2000Jan
Affiliations: 1University of Chicago, 2University of Maryland at College Park, 3University of Chicago
Category: Astrophysics

The discovery of high-amplitude brightness oscillations during type I X-ray bursts from six low-mass X-ray binaries has provided a powerful new tool to study the properties of matter at supranuclear densities, the effects of strong gravity, and the propagation of thermonuclear burning. There is substantial evidence that these brightness oscillations are produced by spin modulation of one or two localized hot spots confined to the stellar surface. It is therefore important to calculate the expected light curves produced by such hot spots under various physical assumptions, so that comparison with the observed light curves may most sensitively yield information about the underlying physical quantities. Read More

1999Dec
Affiliations: 1University of Chicago, 2University of Maryland at College Park, 3University of Chicago
Category: Astrophysics

Many thermonuclear X-ray bursts exhibit brightness oscillations. The brightness oscillations are thought to be due to the combined effects of non-uniform nuclear burning and rotation of the neutron star. The waveforms of the oscillations contain information about the size and number of burning regions. Read More

1999Nov

We better determine the spectral flux distribution of the supernova candidate associated with GRB 970228 by modeling the spectral flux distribution of the host galaxy of this burst, fitting this model to measurements of the host galaxy, and using the fitted model to better subtract out the contribution of the host galaxy to measurements of the afterglow of this burst. Read More

We better determine the spectral flux distribution of the supernova candidate associated with GRB 970228 by modeling the spectral flux distribution of the host galaxy of this burst, fitting this model to measurements of the host galaxy, and using the fitted model to better subtract out the contribution of the host galaxy to measurements of the afterglow of this burst. Furthermore, we discuss why the non-detection of a SN1998bw-like component to the afterglow of GRB 990510 does not necessarily imply that a SN is not associated with this burst. Finally, we discuss how bursts can be used as beacons to locate SNe out to redshifts of z = 4 - 5. Read More

1999Sep
Affiliations: 1University of Chicago, 2University of Chicago
Category: Astrophysics

The recent evidence that the light curves and the spectra of the afterglows of GRB 970228 and GRB 980326 appear to contain a SN component, in addition to a relativistic shock wave component, provide direct clues that at least the long GRBs detected by BeppoSAX are a result of the collapse of massive stars. We show that, if this is indeed the case, GRBs and their afterglows provide a powerful probe of the very high redshift (VHR) (z > 5) universe. We first establish that GRBs and their afterglows are both detectable out to VHRs. Read More

1998Jun
Affiliations: 1University of Chicago, 2University of Chicago, 3California Institute of Technology, 4University of Chicago, 5University of Chicago, 6University of Chicago, 7Thuringer Landessternwarte Tautenburg, 8Kitt Peak National Observatory, 9Space Telescope Science Institute, 10University of Chicago, 11University of Texas
Category: Astrophysics

We report I-band observations of the GRB 980329 field made on March 29 with the 1.34-m Tautenberg Schmidt telescope, R-, J- and K-band observations made on April 1 with the APO 3.5-m telescope, R- and I-band observations made on April 3 with the Mayall 4-m telescope at KPNO, and J- and K-band observations made between April 6 - 8 with the Keck-I 10-m telescope. Read More

BATSE, Ulysses, and TGRS and KONUS on WIND detected four gamma-ray events within 1.8 days during 1996 October 27-29, consistent with coming from the same location on the sky. We assess the evidence that these events may be due to a series of bursts from a single source by calculating the probability that such a clustering in position and in time of occurrence might happen by chance. Read More

We present a new method of transient point source deconvolution for coded-aperture X-Ray detectors. Our method is based upon the calculation of the likelihood function and its interpretation as a probability density for the transient source position by an application of Bayes' Theorem. The method obtains point estimates of source positions by finding the maximum of this probability density, and interval estimates of prescribed probability by choosing suitable contours of constant probability density. Read More

We investigate the viability of Galactic corona models of gamma-ray bursts by calculating the spatial distribution expected for a population of high-velocity neutron stars born in the Galactic disk and moving in a gravitational potential that includes the Galactic bulge, disk, and a dark matter halo. We consider models in which the bursts radiate isotropically and in which the radiation is beamed. We place constraints on the models by comparing the resulting brightness and angular distributions with the data in the BATSE 3B catalog. Read More

We develop a likelihood methodology which can be used to search for evidence of burst repetition in the BATSE catalog, and to study the properties of the repetition signal. We use a simplified model of burst repetition in which a number $N_{\rm r}$ of sources which repeat a fixed number of times $N_{\rm rep}$ are superposed upon a number $N_{\rm nr}$ of non-repeating sources. The instrument exposure is explicitly taken into account. Read More

We investigate the viability of the Galactic halo model of $\gamma$-ray bursts by calculating the spatial distribution of neutron stars born with high velocities in the Galactic disk, and comparing the resulting brightness and angular distribution with the BATSE data. We find that the Galactic halo model can reproduce the BATSE peak flux and angular distribution data for neutron star kick velocities $\simgreat 800$~\kms, source turn-on ages $\simgreat 10$~Myrs, and sampling depths $100{\rm~kpc}\simless d_{max} \simless 400$~kpc. Read More

We describe observational evidence and theoretical calculations which support the high velocity neutron star model of gamma-ray bursts. We estimate the energetic requirements in this model, and discuss possible energy sources. we also consider radiative processes involved in the bursts. Read More