David Berry - Joint Astronomy Centre

David Berry
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David Berry
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Joint Astronomy Centre
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Instrumentation and Methods for Astrophysics (12)
 
Astrophysics of Galaxies (3)
 
Cosmology and Nongalactic Astrophysics (1)
 
Computer Science - Software Engineering (1)

Publications Authored By David Berry

2017Apr
Authors: Derek Ward-Thompson, Kate Pattle, Pierre Bastien, Ray S. Furuya, Woojin Kwon, Shih-Ping Lai, Keping Qiu, David Berry, Minho Choi, Simon Coudé, James Di Francesco, Thiem Hoang, Erica Franzmann, Per Friberg, Sarah F. Graves, Jane S. Greaves, Martin Houde, Doug Johnstone, Jason M. Kirk, Patrick M. Koch, Jungmi Kwon, Chang Won Lee, Di Li, Brenda C. Matthews, Joseph C. Mottram, Harriet Parsons, Andy Pon, Ramprasad Rao, Mark Rawlings, Hiroko Shinnaga, Sarah Sadavoy, Sven van Loo, Yusuke Aso, Do-Young Byun, Eswariah Chakali, Huei-Ru Chen, Mike C. -Y. Chen, Wen Ping Chen, Tao-Chung Ching, Jungyeon Cho, Antonio Chrysostomou, Eun Jung Chung, Yasuo Doi, Emily Drabek-Maunder, Stewart P. S. Eyres, Jason Fiege, Rachel K. Friesen, Gary Fuller, Tim Gledhill, Matt J. Griffin, Qilao Gu, Tetsuo Hasegawa, Jennifer Hatchell, Saeko S. Hayashi, Wayne Holland, Tsuyoshi Inoue, Shu-ichiro Inutsuka, Kazunari Iwasaki, Il-Gyo Jeong, Ji-hyun Kang, Miju Kang, Sung-ju Kang, Koji S. Kawabata, Francisca Kemper, Gwanjeong Kim, Jongsoo Kim, Kee-Tae Kim, Kyoung Hee Kim, Mi-Ryang Kim, Shinyoung Kim, Kevin M. Lacaille, Jeong-Eun Lee, Sang-Sung Lee, Dalei Li, Hua-bai Li, Hong-Li Liu, Junhao Liu, Sheng-Yuan Liu, Tie Liu, A-Ran Lyo, Steve Mairs, Masafumi Matsumura, Gerald H. Moriarty-Schieven, Fumitaka Nakamura, Hiroyuki Nakanishi, Nagayoshi Ohashi, Takashi Onaka, Nicolas Peretto, Tae-Soo Pyo, Lei Qian, Brendan Retter, John Richer, Andrew Rigby, Jean-François Robitaille, Giorgio Savini, Anna M. M. Scaife, Archana Soam, Motohide Tamura, Ya-Wen Tang, Kohji Tomisaka, Hongchi Wang, Jia-Wei Wang, Anthony P. Whitworth, Hsi-Wei Yen, Hyunju Yoo, Jinghua Yuan, Chuan-Peng Zhang, Guoyin Zhang, Jianjun Zhou, Lei Zhu, Philippe André, C. Darren Dowell, Sam Falle, Yusuke Tsukamoto

We present the first results from the B-fields In STar-forming Region Observations (BISTRO) survey, using the Sub-millimetre Common-User Bolometer Array 2 (SCUBA-2) camera, with its associated polarimeter (POL-2), on the James Clerk Maxwell Telescope (JCMT) in Hawaii. We discuss the survey's aims and objectives. We describe the rationale behind the survey, and the questions which the survey will aim to answer. Read More

We present observations of the Cepheus Flare obtained as part of the James Clerk Maxwell Telescope (JCMT) Gould Belt Legacy Survey (GBLS) with the SCUBA-2 instrument. We produce a catalogue of sources found by SCUBA-2, and separate these into starless cores and protostars. We determine masses and densities for each of our sources, using source temperatures determined by the Herschel Gould Belt Survey. Read More

We present a comparison of SCUBA-2 850-$\mu$m and Herschel 70--500-$\mu$m observations of the L1495 filament in the Taurus Molecular Cloud with the goal of characterising the SCUBA-2 Gould Belt Survey (GBS) data set. We identify and characterise starless cores in three data sets: SCUBA-2 850-$\mu$m, Herschel 250-$\mu$m, and Herschel 250-$\mu$m spatially filtered to mimic the SCUBA-2 data. SCUBA-2 detects only the highest-surface-brightness sources, principally detecting protostellar sources and starless cores embedded in filaments, while Herschel is sensitive to most of the cloud structure, including extended low-surface-brightness emission. Read More

In view of increased interest in object-oriented systems for describing coordinate information, we present a description of the data model used by the Starlink AST library. AST provides a comprehensive range of facilities for attaching world co-ordinate systems to astronomical data, and for retrieving and interpreting that information in a variety of formats, including FITS-WCS. AST is a mature system that has been in use for more than 17 years, and may consequently be useful as a means of informing development of similar systems in the future. Read More

With the advent of modern multi-detector heterodyne instruments that can result in observations generating thousands of spectra per minute it is no longer feasible to reduce these data as individual spectra. We describe the automated data reduction procedure used to generate baselined data cubes from heterodyne data obtained at the James Clerk Maxwell Telescope. The system can automatically detect baseline regions in spectra and automatically determine regridding parameters, all without input from a user. Read More

The Flexible Image Transport System (FITS) standard has been a great boon to astronomy, allowing observatories, scientists and the public to exchange astronomical information easily. The FITS standard is, however, showing its age. Developed in the late 1970s the FITS authors made a number of implementation choices for the format that, while common at the time, are now seen to limit its utility with modern data. Read More

The Flexible Image Transport System (FITS) standard has been a great boon to astronomy, allowing observatories, scientists and the public to exchange astronomical information easily. The FITS standard, however, is showing its age. Developed in the late 1970s, the FITS authors made a number of implementation choices that, while common at the time, are now seen to limit its utility with modern data. Read More

This paper describes the FellWalker algorithm, a watershed algorithm that segments a 1-, 2- or 3-dimensional array of data values into a set of disjoint clumps of emission, each containing a single significant peak. Pixels below a nominated constant data level are assumed to be background pixels and are not assigned to any clump. FellWalker is thus equivalent in purpose to the CLUMPFIND algorithm. Read More

The extensible N-Dimensional Data Format (NDF) was designed and developed in the late 1980s to provide a data model suitable for use in a variety of astronomy data processing applications supported by the UK Starlink Project. Starlink applications were used extensively, primarily in the UK astronomical community, and form the basis of a number of advanced data reduction pipelines today. This paper provides an overview of the historical drivers for the development of NDF and the lessons learned from using a defined hierarchical data model for many years in data reduction software, data pipelines and in data acquisition systems. Read More

The Submillimetre Common User Bolometer Array 2 (SCUBA-2) is an instrument operating on the 15-m James Clerk Maxwell Telescope, nominally consisting of 5120 bolometers in each of two simultaneous imaging bands centred over 450 and 850 um. The camera is operated by scanning across the sky and recording data at a rate of 200 Hz. As the largest of a new generation of multiplexed kilopixel bolometer cameras operating in the (sub)millimetre, SCUBA-2 data analysis represents a significant challenge. Read More

SCUBA-2 is a 10000-bolometer submillimetre camera on the James Clerk Maxwell Telescope (JCMT). The instrument commissioning was completed in September 2011, and full science operations began in October 2011. To harness the full potential of this powerful new astronomical tool, the instrument calibration must be accurate and well understood. Read More

Recent developments in the AST library are described, including a Python interface, support for the FITS-WCS "-TAB" system for storing tabular co-ordinate information, and extended support for representing distortions in spatial projections, using several schemes in common use (IRAF TNX/ZPX, Spitzer SIP, NOAO TPV and SCAMP). Read More

SCUBA-2 is the largest submillimetre wide-field bolometric camera ever built. This 43 square arc-minute field-of-view instrument operates at two wavelengths (850 and 450 microns) and has been installed on the James Clerk Maxwell Telescope on Mauna Kea, Hawaii. SCUBA-2 has been successfully commissioned and operational for general science since October 2011. Read More

We have carried out a pilot study for the SCUBA-2 'All-Sky' Survey, SASSy, a wide and shallow mapping project at 850 microns, designed to find rare objects, both Galactic and extragalactic. Two distinct sets of exploratory observations were undertaken, and used to test the SASSy approach and data reduction pipeline. The first was a 0. Read More

2010Nov
Affiliations: 1Joint Astronomy Centre, 2Joint Astronomy Centre, 3University of British Columbia, 4Joint Astronomy Centre, 5University of British Columbia, 6University of British Columbia

SCUBA-2 is the largest submillimetre array camera in the world and was commissioned on the James Clerk Maxwell Telescope (JCMT) with two arrays towards the end of 2009. A period of shared-risks observing was then completed and the full planned complement of 8 arrays, 4 at 850 microns and 4 at 450 microns, are now installed and ready to be commissioned. SCUBA-2 has 10,240 bolometers, corresponding to a data rate of 8 MB/s when sampled at the nominal rate of 200 Hz. Read More