D. Goncalves

D. Goncalves
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High Energy Physics - Phenomenology (14)
 
Mathematics - Operator Algebras (8)
 
Mathematics - Geometric Topology (7)
 
Astrophysics of Galaxies (6)
 
High Energy Physics - Experiment (6)
 
Mathematics - Dynamical Systems (6)
 
Solar and Stellar Astrophysics (6)
 
Mathematics - Group Theory (5)
 
Mathematics - Algebraic Topology (5)
 
Mathematics - Combinatorics (3)
 
Computer Science - Computational Geometry (2)
 
Computer Science - Information Retrieval (2)
 
Computer Science - Discrete Mathematics (2)
 
Mathematics - History and Overview (1)
 
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Computer Science - Information Theory (1)
 
Computer Science - Data Structures and Algorithms (1)
 
Mathematics - Rings and Algebras (1)
 
Physics - Computational Physics (1)

Publications Authored By D. Goncalves

We study groups $G$ where the $\varphi$-conjugacy class $[e]_{\varphi}=\{g^{-1}\varphi(g)~|~g\in G\}$ of the unit element is a subgroup of $G$ for every automorphism $\varphi$ of $G$. If $G$ has $n$ generators, then we prove that the $k$-th member of the lower central series has a finite verbal width bounded in terms of $n,k$. Moreover, we prove that if such group $G$ satisfies the descending chain condition for normal subgroups, then $G$ is nilpotent. Read More

Let $f,g:X\to Y$ be maps from a compact infra-nilmanifold $X$ to a compact nilmanifold $Y$ with $\dim X\ge \dim Y$. In this note, we show that the Wecken property holds, i.e. Read More

We define a notion of (one-sided) edge shift spaces associated to ultragraphs. In the finite case our notion coincides with the edge shift space of a graph. In general, we show that our space is metrizable and has a countable basis of clopen sets. Read More

We define branching systems for finitely aligned higher-rank graphs. From these we construct concrete representations of higher-rank graph C*-algebras on Hilbert spaces. We prove a generalized Cuntz-Krieger uniqueness theorem for periodic single-vertex 2-graphs. Read More

Let $D(M,N)$ be the set of integers that can be realized as the degree of a map between two closed connected orientable manifolds $M$ and $N$ of the same dimension. In this paper, we determine the set $D(M,N)$ where $M$ and $N$ are closed $3$-manifolds with $S^3$-geometry. Read More

In this paper, we explore the fixed point theory of $n$-valued maps using configuration spaces and braid groups, focussing on two fundamental problems, the Wecken property, and the computation of the Nielsen number. We show that the projective plane (resp.\ the $2$-sphere ${\mathbb S}^{2}$) has the Wecken property for $n$-valued maps for all $n\in {\mathbb N}$ (resp. Read More

We study the fixed point theory of n-valued maps of a space X using the fixed point theory of maps between X and its configuration spaces. We give some general results to decide whether an n-valued map can be deformed to a fixed point free n-valued map. In the case of surfaces, we provide an algebraic criterion in terms of the braid groups of X to study this problem. Read More

From the LHC runs we know that, with increasing collider energy, weak-boson-fusion Higgs production dominates as an environment for precision measurements. We show how a future hadron collider performs for three challenging benchmark signatures. Because all of these measurements rely on the tagging jet signature, we first give a comprehensive analysis of weak-boson-fusion kinematics and a proposed two-step jet veto at a 100 TeV hadron collider. Read More

In this work we study the decomposability property of branched coverings of degree $d$ odd, over the projective plane, where the covering surface has Euler characteristic $\leq 0$. The latter condition is equivalent to say that the defect of the covering is greater than $d$. We show that, given a datum $\mathscr{D}=\{D_{1},\dots,D_{s}\}$ with an even defect greater than $d$, it is realizable by an indecomposable branched covering over the projective plane. Read More

We report the detection of near-IR H$_2$ emission from the low-ionization structures (knots) in two planetary nebulae. The deepest ever, high-angular resolution H$_2$ 1-0 S(1) at 2.122$\mu$, H$_2$ 2-1 S(1) at 2. Read More

Let $U$ and $V$ be open subsets of the Cantor set with finite disjoint complements, and let $h:U\to V$ be a homeomorphism with dense orbits. Building from the ideas of Herman, Putnam, and Skau, we show that the partial action induced by $h$ can be realized as the Vershik map on a Bratteli diagram, and that any two such diagrams are equivalent. Read More

Simplified dark matter models have been recently advocated as a powerful tool to exploit the complementarity between dark matter direct detection, indirect detection and LHC experimental probes. Focusing on pseudoscalar mediators between the dark and visible sectors, we show that the simplified dark matter model phenomenology departs significantly from that of consistent ${SU(2)_{\mathrm{L}} \times U(1)_{\mathrm{Y}}}$ gauge invariant completions. We discuss the key physics simplified models fail to capture, and its impact on LHC searches. Read More

2016Oct
Authors: D. de Florian1, C. Grojean2, F. Maltoni3, C. Mariotti4, A. Nikitenko5, M. Pieri6, P. Savard7, M. Schumacher8, R. Tanaka9, R. Aggleton10, M. Ahmad11, B. Allanach12, C. Anastasiou13, W. Astill14, S. Badger15, M. Badziak16, J. Baglio17, E. Bagnaschi18, A. Ballestrero19, A. Banfi20, D. Barducci21, M. Beckingham22, C. Becot23, G. Bélanger24, J. Bellm25, N. Belyaev26, F. U. Bernlochner27, C. Beskidt28, A. Biekötter29, F. Bishara30, W. Bizon31, N. E. Bomark32, M. Bonvini33, S. Borowka34, V. Bortolotto35, S. Boselli36, F. J. Botella37, R. Boughezal38, G. C. Branco39, J. Brehmer40, L. Brenner41, S. Bressler42, I. Brivio43, A. Broggio44, H. Brun45, G. Buchalla46, C. D. Burgard47, A. Calandri48, L. Caminada49, R. Caminal Armadans50, F. Campanario51, J. Campbell52, F. Caola53, C. M. Carloni Calame54, S. Carrazza55, A. Carvalho56, M. Casolino57, O. Cata58, A. Celis59, F. Cerutti60, N. Chanon61, M. Chen62, X. Chen63, B. Chokoufé Nejad64, N. Christensen65, M. Ciuchini66, R. Contino67, T. Corbett68, R. Costa69, D. Curtin70, M. Dall'Osso71, A. David72, S. Dawson73, J. de Blas74, W. de Boer75, P. de Castro Manzano76, C. Degrande77, R. L. Delgado78, F. Demartin79, A. Denner80, B. Di Micco81, R. Di Nardo82, S. Dittmaier83, A. Dobado84, T. Dorigo85, F. A. Dreyer86, M. Dührssen87, C. Duhr88, F. Dulat89, K. Ecker90, K. Ellis91, U. Ellwanger92, C. Englert93, D. Espriu94, A. Falkowski95, L. Fayard96, R. Feger97, G. Ferrera98, A. Ferroglia99, N. Fidanza100, T. Figy101, M. Flechl102, D. Fontes103, S. Forte104, P. Francavilla105, E. Franco106, R. Frederix107, A. Freitas108, F. F. Freitas109, F. Frensch110, S. Frixione111, B. Fuks112, E. Furlan113, S. Gadatsch114, J. Gao115, Y. Gao116, M. V. Garzelli117, T. Gehrmann118, R. Gerosa119, M. Ghezzi120, D. Ghosh121, S. Gieseke122, D. Gillberg123, G. F. Giudice124, E. W. N. Glover125, F. Goertz126, D. Gonçalves127, J. Gonzalez-Fraile128, M. Gorbahn129, S. Gori130, C. A. Gottardo131, M. Gouzevitch132, P. Govoni133, D. Gray134, M. Grazzini135, N. Greiner136, A. Greljo137, J. Grigo138, A. V. Gritsan139, R. Gröber140, S. Guindon141, H. E. Haber142, C. Han143, T. Han144, R. Harlander145, M. A. Harrendorf146, H. B. Hartanto147, C. Hays148, S. Heinemeyer149, G. Heinrich150, M. Herrero151, F. Herzog152, B. Hespel153, V. Hirschi154, S. Hoeche155, S. Honeywell156, S. J. Huber157, C. Hugonie158, J. Huston159, A. Ilnicka160, G. Isidori161, B. Jäger162, M. Jaquier163, S. P. Jones164, A. Juste165, S. Kallweit166, A. Kaluza167, A. Kardos168, A. Karlberg169, Z. Kassabov170, N. Kauer171, D. I. Kazakov172, M. Kerner173, W. Kilian174, F. Kling175, K. Köneke176, R. Kogler177, R. Konoplich178, S. Kortner179, S. Kraml180, C. Krause181, F. Krauss182, M. Krawczyk183, A. Kulesza184, S. Kuttimalai185, R. Lane186, A. Lazopoulos187, G. Lee188, P. Lenzi189, I. M. Lewis190, Y. Li191, S. Liebler192, J. Lindert193, X. Liu194, Z. Liu195, F. J. Llanes-Estrada196, H. E. Logan197, D. Lopez-Val198, I. Low199, G. Luisoni200, P. Maierhöfer201, E. Maina202, B. Mansoulié203, H. Mantler204, M. Mantoani205, A. C. Marini206, V. I. Martinez Outschoorn207, S. Marzani208, D. Marzocca209, A. Massironi210, K. Mawatari211, J. Mazzitelli212, A. McCarn213, B. Mellado214, K. Melnikov215, S. B. Menari216, L. Merlo217, C. Meyer218, P. Milenovic219, K. Mimasu220, S. Mishima221, B. Mistlberger222, S. -O. Moch223, A. Mohammadi224, P. F. Monni225, G. Montagna226, M. Moreno Llácer227, N. Moretti228, S. Moretti229, L. Motyka230, A. Mück231, M. Mühlleitner232, S. Munir233, P. Musella234, P. Nadolsky235, D. Napoletano236, M. Nebot237, C. Neu238, M. Neubert239, R. Nevzorov240, O. Nicrosini241, J. Nielsen242, K. Nikolopoulos243, J. M. No244, C. O'Brien245, T. Ohl246, C. Oleari247, T. Orimoto248, D. Pagani249, C. E. Pandini250, A. Papaefstathiou251, A. S. Papanastasiou252, G. Passarino253, B. D. Pecjak254, M. Pelliccioni255, G. Perez256, L. Perrozzi257, F. Petriello258, G. Petrucciani259, E. Pianori260, F. Piccinini261, M. Pierini262, A. Pilkington263, S. Plätzer264, T. Plehn265, R. Podskubka266, C. T. Potter267, S. Pozzorini268, K. Prokofiev269, A. Pukhov270, I. Puljak271, M. Queitsch-Maitland272, J. Quevillon273, D. Rathlev274, M. Rauch275, E. Re276, M. N. Rebelo277, D. Rebuzzi278, L. Reina279, C. Reuschle280, J. Reuter281, M. Riembau282, F. Riva283, A. Rizzi284, T. Robens285, R. Röntsch286, J. Rojo287, J. C. Romão288, N. Rompotis289, J. Roskes290, R. Roth291, G. P. Salam292, R. Salerno293, M. O. P. Sampaio294, R. Santos295, V. Sanz296, J. J. Sanz-Cillero297, H. Sargsyan298, U. Sarica299, P. Schichtel300, J. Schlenk301, T. Schmidt302, C. Schmitt303, M. Schönherr304, U. Schubert305, M. Schulze306, S. Sekula307, M. Sekulla308, E. Shabalina309, H. S. Shao310, J. Shelton311, C. H. Shepherd-Themistocleous312, S. Y. Shim313, F. Siegert314, A. Signer315, J. P. Silva316, L. Silvestrini317, M. Sjodahl318, P. Slavich319, M. Slawinska320, L. Soffi321, M. Spannowsky322, C. Speckner323, D. M. Sperka324, M. Spira325, O. Stål326, F. Staub327, T. Stebel328, T. Stefaniak329, M. Steinhauser330, I. W. Stewart331, M. J. Strassler332, J. Streicher333, D. M. Strom334, S. Su335, X. Sun336, F. J. Tackmann337, K. Tackmann338, A. M. Teixeira339, R. Teixeira de Lima340, V. Theeuwes341, R. Thorne342, D. Tommasini343, P. Torrielli344, M. Tosi345, F. Tramontano346, Z. Trócsányi347, M. Trott348, I. Tsinikos349, M. Ubiali350, P. Vanlaer351, W. Verkerke352, A. Vicini353, L. Viliani354, E. Vryonidou355, D. Wackeroth356, C. E. M. Wagner357, J. Wang358, S. Wayand359, G. Weiglein360, C. Weiss361, M. Wiesemann362, C. Williams363, J. Winter364, D. Winterbottom365, R. Wolf366, M. Xiao367, L. L. Yang368, R. Yohay369, S. P. Y. Yuen370, G. Zanderighi371, M. Zaro372, D. Zeppenfeld373, R. Ziegler374, T. Zirke375, J. Zupan376
Affiliations: 1eds., 2eds., 3eds., 4eds., 5eds., 6eds., 7eds., 8eds., 9eds., 10The LHC Higgs Cross Section Working Group, 11The LHC Higgs Cross Section Working Group, 12The LHC Higgs Cross Section Working Group, 13The LHC Higgs Cross Section Working Group, 14The LHC Higgs Cross Section Working Group, 15The LHC Higgs Cross Section Working Group, 16The LHC Higgs Cross Section Working Group, 17The LHC Higgs Cross Section Working Group, 18The LHC Higgs Cross Section Working Group, 19The LHC Higgs Cross Section Working Group, 20The LHC Higgs Cross Section Working Group, 21The LHC Higgs Cross Section Working Group, 22The LHC Higgs Cross Section Working Group, 23The LHC Higgs Cross Section Working Group, 24The LHC Higgs Cross Section Working Group, 25The LHC Higgs Cross Section Working Group, 26The LHC Higgs Cross Section Working Group, 27The LHC Higgs Cross Section Working Group, 28The LHC Higgs Cross Section Working Group, 29The LHC Higgs Cross Section Working Group, 30The LHC Higgs Cross 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This Report summarizes the results of the activities of the LHC Higgs Cross Section Working Group in the period 2014-2016. The main goal of the working group was to present the state-of-the-art of Higgs physics at the LHC, integrating all new results that have appeared in the last few years. The first part compiles the most up-to-date predictions of Higgs boson production cross sections and decay branching ratios, parton distribution functions, and off-shell Higgs boson production and interference effects. Read More

We study the feasibility of probing a region of Natural Supersymmetry where the stop and higgsino masses are compressed. Although this region is most effectively searched for in the mono-jet channel, this signature is present in many other non-supersymmetric frameworks. Therefore, another channel that carries orthogonal information is required to confirm the existence of the light stop and higgsinos. Read More

In this paper, we make use of the relations between the braid and mapping class groups of a compact, connected, non-orientable surface N without boundary and those of its orientable double covering S to study embeddings of these groups and their (virtual) cohomological dimensions. We first generalise results of Birman and Chillingworth and of Gon\c{c}alves and Guaschi to show that the mapping class group MCG(N ; k) of N relative to a k-point subset embeds in the mapping class group MCG(S; 2k) of S relative to a 2k-point subset. We then compute the cohomological dimension of the braid groups of all compact, connected aspherical surfaces without boundary. Read More

We present new spectroscopic observations obtained with GMOS@Gemini-S of a sample of 25 hii regions located in NGC 55, a late-type galaxy in the nearby Sculptor group. We derive physical conditions and chemical composition through the te-method for 18 hii regions, and strong-line abundances for 22 hii regions. We provide abundances of He, O, N, Ne, S, Ar, finding a substantially homogenous composition in the ionised gas of the disc of NGC 55, with no trace of radial gradients. Read More

Recommendation systems are being explored by Cable TV operators to improve user satisfaction with services, such as Live TV and Video on Demand (VOD) services. More recently, Catch-up TV has been introduced, allowing users to watch recent broadcast content whenever they want to. These services give users a large set of options from which they can choose from, creating an information overflow problem. Read More

Nowadays, Cable TV operators provide their users multiple ways to watch TV content, such as Live TV and Video on Demand (VOD) services. In the last years, Catch-up TV has been introduced, allowing users to watch recent broadcast content whenever they want to. Understanding how the users interact with such services is important to develop solutions that may increase user satisfaction , user engagement and user consumption. Read More

Under certain conditions, we describe the homotopy type of the homo-topy fibre of the inclusion map F\_n(X) $\rightarrow$ $\prod$\_1^n X for the n-th configuration space F\_n(X) of a topological manifold X without boundary such that dim(X) $\ge$ 3. We then apply our results to the cases where either the universal covering of X is contractible or X is an orbit space S^k/G of a tame, free action of a Lie group G on the k-sphere S^k. If the group G is finite and k is odd, we give a full description of the long exact sequence in homotopy of the homotopy fibration of the inclusion map F\_n(S^k/G) $\rightarrow$ $\prod$\_1^n S^k/G. Read More

Let M and N be topological spaces such that M admits a free involution $\\tau$. A homotopy class $\beta$ $\in$ [M, N ] is said to have the Borsuk-Ulam property with respect to $\\tau$ if for every representative map f : M $\rightarrow$ N of $\beta$, there exists a point x $\in$ M such that f ($\\tau$ (x)) = f (x). In the case where M is a compact, connected manifold without boundary and N is a compact, connected surface without boundary different from the 2-sphere and the real projective plane, we formulate this property in terms of the pure and full 2-string braid groups of N , and of the fundamental groups of M and the orbit space of M with respect to the action of $\\tau$. Read More

The quest for new heavy states is a critical component of the LHC physics program. In this letter, we study the search for pseudoscalar bosons produced in association with a $t\bar{t}$ pair. We consider the final state $t\bar{t} A \to t\bar{t} b\bar{b}$ with di-leptonic top pair signature, and reconstruct the boosted $A \to b\bar{b}$ candidate with jet substructure techniques, achieving a remarkable sensitivity over a broad range of pseudoscalar masses and Yukawa couplings. Read More

The induced arboricity of a graph $G$ is the smallest number of induced forests covering the edges of $G$. This is a well-defined parameter bounded from above by the number of edges of $G$ when each forest in a cover consists of exactly one edge. Not all edges of a graph necessarily belong to induced forests with larger components. Read More

Complex networks have been widely used in science and technology because of their ability to represent several systems. One of these systems is found in Biochemistry, in which the synthesis of new nanoparticles is a hot topic. However, the interpretation of experimental results in the search of new nanoparticles poses several challenges. Read More

Higgs boson production in association with a $Z$-boson at the LHC is analysed, both in the Standard Model and in Simplified Model extensions for Dark Matter. We focus on $H\rightarrow$invisibles searches and show that loop-induced components for both the signal and background present phenomenologically relevant contributions to the $\mathcal{BR}(H\rightarrow\textit{inv})$ limits. In addition, the constraining power of this channel to Simplified Models for Dark Matter with scalar and pseudo-scalar mediators $\phi$ and $A$ is discussed and compared with non-collider constraints. Read More

We report the detection of near-IR H$_2$ lines emission from low-ionization structures (LISs) in planetary nebulae. The deepest, high-angular resolution H$_2$ 1-0 S(1) at 2.122 $\mu$m, and H$_2$ 2-1 S(1) at 2. Read More

We point out that a distinctive mono-top signature is present in Natural SUSY scenarios when a scalar top-quark and higgsinos are almost mass degenerate. This signature originates from a supersymmetric counter part of the $t \bar t H$ process, i.e. Read More

Let G be a virtually cyclic of the form (Z_a x Z_b) x Z or [Z_a x (Z b x Q_{2^i})] x Z. We compute the integral cohomology ring of G, and then obtain the periodicity of the Farell cohomology of these groups. Read More

We give a notion of branching systems on ultragraphs. From this we build concrete representations of ultragraph C*-algebras on the bounded linear operators of Hilbert spaces. To each branching system of an ultragraph we describe the associated Perron-Frobenius operator in terms of the induced representation. Read More

Abell 14 is a poorly studied object despite being considered a born again planetary nebula. We performed a detailed study of its 3D morphology and ionization structure using the SHAPE and MOCASSIN codes. We found that Abell 14 is a highly evolved, bipolar nebula with a kinematical age of $\sim$19,400 yr for a distance of 4 kpc. Read More

Based on the knowledge of the QCD radiation pattern, observables to distinguish jets containing one and two $b$-hadrons are discussed. A simple method is used to combine pairs of the most sensitive observables, girth, number of charged tracks and the energy or momentum fraction of the leading $b$-hadron with respect to the jet, into one discriminator. Their efficiencies, on particle level, are estimated and found to improve the performance and the robustness of the observables in different momentum slices. Read More

In the recent paper on "The Higgs Legacy of the LHC Run I" we interpreted the LHC Higgs results in terms of an effective Lagrangian using the SFitter framework. For the on-shell Higgs analysis of rates and kinematic distributions we relied on a linear representation based on dimension-6 operators with a simplified fermion sector. In this addendum we describe how the extension of Higgs couplings modifications in a linear dimension-6 Lagrangian can be formally understood in terms of the non-linear effective field theory. Read More

We show that several classes of groups G of PL-homeomorphisms of the real line admit non-trivial homomorphisms from G to the additive group of reals that are fixed by every automorphism of G. The classes of groups enjoying the stated property include the generalisations of Thompson's group F studied by K. S. Read More

We consider the production of dark matter in association with a pair of top quarks, mediated by a scalar or pseudoscalar particle in a generic Simplified Model. We demonstrate that the difference of azimuthal angle between the two leptons $\Delta \phi_{ll}$, in the dileptonic top decay mode, can directly probe the CP-properties of the mediator. We estimate the constraints to strength and CP-structure of dark matter production for these well-motivated Simplified Models from the LHC Run II. Read More

In this work we realize Leavitt path algebras as partial skew groupoid rings. This yields a free path groupoid grading on Leavitt path algebras. Using this grading we characterize free path groupoid graded isomorphisms of Leavitt path algebras that preserves generators. Read More

For a family of geometric objects in the plane $\mathcal{F}=\{S_1,\ldots,S_n\}$, define $\chi(\mathcal{F})$ as the least integer $\ell$ such that the elements of $\mathcal{F}$ can be colored with $\ell$ colors, in such a way that any two intersecting objects have distinct colors. When $\mathcal{F}$ is a set of pseudo-disks that may only intersect on their boundaries, and such that any point of the plane is contained in at most $k$ pseudo-disks, it can be proven that $\chi(\mathcal{F})\le 3k/2 + o(k)$ since the problem is equivalent to cyclic coloring of plane graphs. In this paper, we study the same problem when pseudo-disks are replaced by a family $\mathcal{F}$ of pseudo-segments (a. Read More

Let M be a surface, perhaps with boundary, and either compact, or with a finite number of points removed from the interior of the surface. We consider the inclusion i: F\_n(M) --\textgreater{} M^n of the nth configuration space F\_n(M) of M into the n-fold Cartesian product of M, as well as the induced homomorphism i\_\#: P\_n(M) --\textgreater{} (\pi\_1(M))^n, where P\_n(M) is the n-string pure braid group of M. Both i and i\_\# were studied initially by J. Read More

In this paper we further develop the theory of one sided shift spaces over infinite alphabets, characterizing one-step shifts as edge shifts of ultragraphs and partially answering a conjecture regarding shifts of finite type (we show that there exists shifts of finite type that are not conjugate, via a conjugacy that is eventually finite periodic, to an edge shift of a graph ). We also show that there exists edge shifts of ultragraphs that are shifts of finite type, but are not conjugate to a full shift, a result that is not true for edge shifts of graphs. One of the key results needed in the proofs of our conclusions is the realization of a class of ultragraph C*-algebras as partial crossed products, a result of interest on its own. Read More

In this work we characterize shift spaces over infinite countable alphabets that can be endowed with an inverse semigroup operation. We give sufficient conditions under which zero-dimensional inverse semigroups can be recoded as shift spaces whose correspondent inverse semigroup operation is a 1-block operation, that is, it arises from a group operation on the alphabet. Motivated by this, we go on to study block operations on shift spaces and, in the end, we prove our main theorem, which states that Markovian shift spaces, which can be endowed with a 1-block inverse semigroup operation, are conjugate to the product of a full shift with a fractal shift. Read More

In this paper we consider the Maximum Independent Set problem (MIS) on $B_1$-EPG graphs. EPG (for Edge intersection graphs of Paths on a Grid) was introduced in ~\cite{edgeintersinglebend} as the class of graphs whose vertices can be represented as simple paths on a rectangular grid so that two vertices are adjacent if and only if the corresponding paths share at least one edge of the underlying grid. The restricted class $B_k$-EPG denotes EPG-graphs where every path has at most $k$ bends. Read More

Though the small-scale, low-ionization knots, filaments and jets (LISs) of planetary nebulae (PNe) are known for ~30yr, some of their observational properties are not well established. In consequence our ability to include them in the wider context of the formation and evolution of PNe is directly affected. Why most structures have lower densities than the PN shells hosting them? Is their intense emission in low-ionization lines the key to their main excitation mechanism? Therefore, if considered altogether, can LISs line ratios, chemical abundances and kinematics enlighten the interplay between the different excitation and formation processes? Here we present a spectroscopic analysis of five PNe that possess LISs confirming that all nebular components have comparable electron temperatures, whereas the electron density is systematically lower in LISs than in the surrounding nebula. Read More

Context. Complex bipolar shapes can be generated either as a planetary nebula or a symbiotic system. The origin of the material ionised by the white dwarf is very different in these two scenarios, and it complicates the understanding of the morphologies of planetary nebulae. Read More

We analyse the production of a Higgs boson in association with a Z boson at hadron colliders in the Standard Model and some simple extensions. We show how multi-jet merging algorithms at leading and next-to-leading order for the loop-induced gluon fusion and the Drell-Yan like quark-induced processes, respectively, improve the descriptions for various differential distributions, in particular those that involve the production of additional jets. The phenomenological studies focus on two relevant channels of Higgs boson decays, namely $H\rightarrow invisible$ and $H\rightarrow b\bar{b}$. Read More

The ATLAS collaboration recently reported an excess of events in the high invariant mass tail of reconstructed di-boson events. We investigate their analysis and point to possible subtleties and improvements in the jet substructure implementation and data-driven background estimates. Read More

Characterizing the 125 GeV Higgs is a critical component of the physics program at the LHC Run II. In this Letter, we consider $t\bar{t}H$ associated production in the dileptonic mode. We demonstrate that the difference in azimuthal angle between the leptons from top decays can directly reveal the CP-structure of the top-Higgs coupling with the sensitivity of the measurement substantiality enhanced in the boosted Higgs regime. Read More

Poulalhon and Schaeffer introduced an elegant method to linearly encode a planar triangulation optimally. The method is based on performing a special depth-first search algorithm on a particular orientation of the triangulation: the minimal Schnyder wood. Recent progress toward generalizing Schnyder woods to higher genus enables us to generalize this method to the toroidal case. Read More

In this note we propose an alternative definition for sliding block codes between shift spaces. This definition coincides with the usual definition in the case that the shift space is defined on a finite alphabet, but it encompass a larger class of maps when the alphabet is infinite. In any case, the proposed definition keeps the idea that a sliding block code is a map with a local rule. Read More

We present high-dispersion spectroscopic data of the compact planetary nebula Vy 1-2, where high expansion velocities up to 100 km/s are found in the Ha, [N II] and [O III] emission lines. HST images reveal a bipolar structure. Vy 1-2 displays a bright ring-like structure with a size of 2. Read More

Ott, Tomforde, and Willis proposed a useful compactification for one-sided shifts over infinite alphabets. Building from their idea we develop a notion of two-sided shift spaces over infinite alphabets, with an eye towards generalizing a result of Kitchens. As with the one-sided shifts over infinite alphabets our shift spaces are compact Hausdorff spaces but, in contrast to the one-sided setting, our shift map is continuous everywhere. Read More

It is well known that when $G$ is the fundamental group of a closed surface of negative Euler characteristic, it has the $R_{\infty}$ property. In this work we compute the least integer $c$, {\it called the $R_{\infty}$-nilpotency degree of $G$}, such that the group $G/ \gamma_{c+1}(G)$ has the $R_{\infty}$ property, where $\gamma_r(G)$ is the $r$-th term of the lower central series of $G$. We show that $c=4$ for $G$ the fundamental group of any orientable closed surface $S_g$ of genus $g>1$. Read More

Based on Run I data we present a comprehensive analysis of Higgs couplings. For the first time this SFitter analysis includes independent tests of the Higgs-gluon and top Yukawa couplings, Higgs decays to invisible particles, and off-shell Higgs measurements. The observed Higgs boson is fully consistent with the Standard Model, both in terms of coupling modifications and effective field theory. Read More