D. Brooks - George Mason University, USA

D. Brooks
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Name
D. Brooks
Affiliation
George Mason University, USA
City
Fairfax
Country
United States

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Cosmology and Nongalactic Astrophysics (32)
 
Astrophysics of Galaxies (19)
 
Solar and Stellar Astrophysics (8)
 
High Energy Astrophysical Phenomena (5)
 
Instrumentation and Methods for Astrophysics (5)
 
Computer Science - Learning (1)
 
Earth and Planetary Astrophysics (1)

Publications Authored By D. Brooks

Coronal mass ejections (CMEs) are one of the primary manifestations of solar activity and can drive severe space weather effects. Therefore, it is vital to work towards being able to predict their occurrence. However, many aspects of CME formation and eruption remain unclear, including whether magnetic flux ropes are present before the onset of eruption and the key mechanisms that cause CMEs to occur. Read More

We characterize the ability of the Dark Energy Camera (DECam) to perform relative astrometry across its 500~Mpix, 3 deg^2 science field of view, and across 4 years of operation. This is done using internal comparisons of ~4x10^7 measurements of high-S/N stellar images obtained in repeat visits to fields of moderate stellar density, with the telescope dithered to move the sources around the array. An empirical astrometric model includes terms for: optical distortions; stray electric fields in the CCD detectors; chromatic terms in the instrumental and atmospheric optics; shifts in CCD relative positions of up to ~10 um when the DECam temperature cycles; and low-order distortions to each exposure from changes in atmospheric refraction and telescope alignment. Read More

Chemically peculiar stars in dwarf galaxies provide a window for exploring the birth environment of stars with varying chemical enrichment. We present a chemical abundance analysis of the brightest star in the newly discovered ultra-faint dwarf galaxy candidate Tucana III. Because it is particularly bright for a star in an ultra-faint Milky Way satellite, we are able to measure the abundance of 28 elements, including 13 neutron-capture species. Read More

We report the observation and physical characterization of the possible dwarf planet \UZ\ ("DeeDee"), a dynamically detached trans-Neptunian object discovered at 92 AU. This object is currently the second-most distant known trans-Neptunian object with reported orbital elements, surpassed in distance only by the dwarf planet Eris. The object was discovered with an $r$-band magnitude of 23. Read More

We present gravitational lens models of the multiply imaged quasar DES J0408-5354, recently discovered in the Dark Energy Survey (DES) footprint, with the aim of interpreting its remarkable quad-like configuration. We first model the DES single-epoch $grizY$ images as a superposition of a lens galaxy and four point-like objects, obtaining spectral energy distributions (SEDs) and relative positions for the objects. Three of the point sources (A,B,D) have SEDs compatible with the discovery quasar spectra, while the faintest point-like image (G2/C) shows significant reddening and a `grey' dimming of $\approx0. Read More

We report the discovery and spectroscopic confirmation of the quad-like lensed quasar system DES J0408-5354 found in the Dark Energy Survey (DES) Year 1 (Y1) data. This system was discovered during a search for DES Y1 strong lensing systems using a method that identified candidates as red galaxies with multiple blue neighbors. DES J0408-5354 consists of a central red galaxy surrounded by three bright (i < 20) blue objects and a fourth red object. Read More

An X1.6 flare occurred in AR 12192 on 2014 October 22 at 14:02 UT and was observed by Hinode, IRIS, SDO, and RHESSI. We analyze a bright kernel which produces a white light (WL) flare with continuum enhancement and a hard X-ray (HXR) peak. Read More

Measurements of the galaxy stellar mass function are crucial to understand the formation of galaxies in the Universe. In a hierarchical clustering paradigm it is plausible that there is a connection between the properties of galaxies and their environments. Evidence for environmental trends has been established in the local Universe. Read More

In this paper the effect of weak lensing magnification on galaxy number counts is studied by cross-correlating the positions of two galaxy samples, separated by redshift, using data from the Dark Energy Survey Science Verification dataset. The analysis is carried out for two photometrically-selected galaxy samples, with mean photometric redshifts in the $0.2 < z < 0. Read More

The coalescence of a binary neutron star (BNS) pair is expected to produce gravitational waves (GW) and electromagnetic (EM) radiation, both of which may be detectable with currently available instruments. We describe a search for a theoretically predicted r-process optical transient from these mergers, dubbed the kilonova (KN), using griz broadband data from the Dark Energy Survey Supernova Program (DES-SN). Some models predict KNe to be redder, shorter-lived, and dimmer than supernovae (SNe), but at present the event rate of KNe is poorly constrained. Read More

We present a study of quasar selection using the DES supernova fields. We used a quasar catalog from an overlapping portion of the SDSS Stripe 82 region to quantify the completeness and efficiency of selection methods involving color, probabilistic modeling, variability, and combinations of color/probabilistic modeling with variability. We only considered objects that appear as point sources in the DES images. Read More

We search for excess gamma-ray emission coincident with the positions of confirmed and candidate Milky Way satellite galaxies using 6 years of data from the Fermi Large Area Telescope (LAT). Our sample of 45 stellar systems includes 28 kinematically confirmed dark-matter-dominated dwarf spheroidal galaxies (dSphs) and 17 recently discovered systems that have photometric characteristics consistent with the population of known dSphs. For each of these targets, the relative predicted gamma-ray flux due to dark matter annihilation is taken from kinematic analysis if available, and estimated from a distance-based scaling relation otherwise, assuming that the stellar systems are dark-matter-dominated dSphs. Read More

2016Oct
Authors: DESI Collaboration, Amir Aghamousa, Jessica Aguilar, Steve Ahlen, Shadab Alam, Lori E. Allen, Carlos Allende Prieto, James Annis, Stephen Bailey, Christophe Balland, Otger Ballester, Charles Baltay, Lucas Beaufore, Chris Bebek, Timothy C. Beers, Eric F. Bell, José Luis Bernal, Robert Besuner, Florian Beutler, Chris Blake, Hannes Bleuler, Michael Blomqvist, Robert Blum, Adam S. Bolton, Cesar Briceno, David Brooks, Joel R. Brownstein, Elizabeth Buckley-Geer, Angela Burden, Etienne Burtin, Nicolas G. Busca, Robert N. Cahn, Yan-Chuan Cai, Laia Cardiel-Sas, Raymond G. Carlberg, Pierre-Henri Carton, Ricard Casas, Francisco J. Castander, Jorge L. Cervantes-Cota, Todd M. Claybaugh, Madeline Close, Carl T. Coker, Shaun Cole, Johan Comparat, Andrew P. Cooper, M. -C. Cousinou, Martin Crocce, Jean-Gabriel Cuby, Daniel P. Cunningham, Tamara M. Davis, Kyle S. Dawson, Axel de la Macorra, Juan De Vicente, Timothée Delubac, Mark Derwent, Arjun Dey, Govinda Dhungana, Zhejie Ding, Peter Doel, Yutong T. Duan, Anne Ealet, Jerry Edelstein, Sarah Eftekharzadeh, Daniel J. Eisenstein, Ann Elliott, Stéphanie Escoffier, Matthew Evatt, Parker Fagrelius, Xiaohui Fan, Kevin Fanning, Arya Farahi, Jay Farihi, Ginevra Favole, Yu Feng, Enrique Fernandez, Joseph R. Findlay, Douglas P. Finkbeiner, Michael J. Fitzpatrick, Brenna Flaugher, Samuel Flender, Andreu Font-Ribera, Jaime E. Forero-Romero, Pablo Fosalba, Carlos S. Frenk, Michele Fumagalli, Boris T. Gaensicke, Giuseppe Gallo, Juan Garcia-Bellido, Enrique Gaztanaga, Nicola Pietro Gentile Fusillo, Terry Gerard, Irena Gershkovich, Tommaso Giannantonio, Denis Gillet, Guillermo Gonzalez-de-Rivera, Violeta Gonzalez-Perez, Shelby Gott, Or Graur, Gaston Gutierrez, Julien Guy, Salman Habib, Henry Heetderks, Ian Heetderks, Katrin Heitmann, Wojciech A. Hellwing, David A. Herrera, Shirley Ho, Stephen Holland, Klaus Honscheid, Eric Huff, Timothy A. Hutchinson, Dragan Huterer, Ho Seong Hwang, Joseph Maria Illa Laguna, Yuzo Ishikawa, Dianna Jacobs, Niall Jeffrey, Patrick Jelinsky, Elise Jennings, Linhua Jiang, Jorge Jimenez, Jennifer Johnson, Richard Joyce, Eric Jullo, Stéphanie Juneau, Sami Kama, Armin Karcher, Sonia Karkar, Robert Kehoe, Noble Kennamer, Stephen Kent, Martin Kilbinger, Alex G. Kim, David Kirkby, Theodore Kisner, Ellie Kitanidis, Jean-Paul Kneib, Sergey Koposov, Eve Kovacs, Kazuya Koyama, Anthony Kremin, Richard Kron, Luzius Kronig, Andrea Kueter-Young, Cedric G. Lacey, Robin Lafever, Ofer Lahav, Andrew Lambert, Michael Lampton, Martin Landriau, Dustin Lang, Tod R. Lauer, Jean-Marc Le Goff, Laurent Le Guillou, Auguste Le Van Suu, Jae Hyeon Lee, Su-Jeong Lee, Daniela Leitner, Michael Lesser, Michael E. Levi, Benjamin L'Huillier, Baojiu Li, Ming Liang, Huan Lin, Eric Linder, Sarah R. Loebman, Zarija Lukić, Jun Ma, Niall MacCrann, Christophe Magneville, Laleh Makarem, Marc Manera, Christopher J. Manser, Robert Marshall, Paul Martini, Richard Massey, Thomas Matheson, Jeremy McCauley, Patrick McDonald, Ian D. McGreer, Aaron Meisner, Nigel Metcalfe, Timothy N. Miller, Ramon Miquel, John Moustakas, Adam Myers, Milind Naik, Jeffrey A. Newman, Robert C. Nichol, Andrina Nicola, Luiz Nicolati da Costa, Jundan Nie, Gustavo Niz, Peder Norberg, Brian Nord, Dara Norman, Peter Nugent, Thomas O'Brien, Minji Oh, Knut A. G. Olsen, Cristobal Padilla, Hamsa Padmanabhan, Nikhil Padmanabhan, Nathalie Palanque-Delabrouille, Antonella Palmese, Daniel Pappalardo, Isabelle Pâris, Changbom Park, Anna Patej, John A. Peacock, Hiranya V. Peiris, Xiyan Peng, Will J. Percival, Sandrine Perruchot, Matthew M. Pieri, Richard Pogge, Jennifer E. Pollack, Claire Poppett, Francisco Prada, Abhishek Prakash, Ronald G. Probst, David Rabinowitz, Anand Raichoor, Chang Hee Ree, Alexandre Refregier, Xavier Regal, Beth Reid, Kevin Reil, Mehdi Rezaie, Constance M. Rockosi, Natalie Roe, Samuel Ronayette, Aaron Roodman, Ashley J. Ross, Nicholas P. Ross, Graziano Rossi, Eduardo Rozo, Vanina Ruhlmann-Kleider, Eli S. Rykoff, Cristiano Sabiu, Lado Samushia, Eusebio Sanchez, Javier Sanchez, David J. Schlegel, Michael Schneider, Michael Schubnell, Aurélia Secroun, Uros Seljak, Hee-Jong Seo, Santiago Serrano, Arman Shafieloo, Huanyuan Shan, Ray Sharples, Michael J. Sholl, William V. Shourt, Joseph H. Silber, David R. Silva, Martin M. Sirk, Anze Slosar, Alex Smith, George F. Smoot, Debopam Som, Yong-Seon Song, David Sprayberry, Ryan Staten, Andy Stefanik, Gregory Tarle, Suk Sien Tie, Jeremy L. Tinker, Rita Tojeiro, Francisco Valdes, Octavio Valenzuela, Monica Valluri, Mariana Vargas-Magana, Licia Verde, Alistair R. Walker, Jiali Wang, Yuting Wang, Benjamin A. Weaver, Curtis Weaverdyck, Risa H. Wechsler, David H. Weinberg, Martin White, Qian Yang, Christophe Yeche, Tianmeng Zhang, Gong-Bo Zhao, Yi Zheng, Xu Zhou, Zhimin Zhou, Yaling Zhu, Hu Zou, Ying Zu

DESI (Dark Energy Spectroscopic Instrument) is a Stage IV ground-based dark energy experiment that will study baryon acoustic oscillations (BAO) and the growth of structure through redshift-space distortions with a wide-area galaxy and quasar redshift survey. To trace the underlying dark matter distribution, spectroscopic targets will be selected in four classes from imaging data. We will measure luminous red galaxies up to $z=1. Read More

2016Oct
Authors: DESI Collaboration, Amir Aghamousa, Jessica Aguilar, Steve Ahlen, Shadab Alam, Lori E. Allen, Carlos Allende Prieto, James Annis, Stephen Bailey, Christophe Balland, Otger Ballester, Charles Baltay, Lucas Beaufore, Chris Bebek, Timothy C. Beers, Eric F. Bell, José Luis Bernal, Robert Besuner, Florian Beutler, Chris Blake, Hannes Bleuler, Michael Blomqvist, Robert Blum, Adam S. Bolton, Cesar Briceno, David Brooks, Joel R. Brownstein, Elizabeth Buckley-Geer, Angela Burden, Etienne Burtin, Nicolas G. Busca, Robert N. Cahn, Yan-Chuan Cai, Laia Cardiel-Sas, Raymond G. Carlberg, Pierre-Henri Carton, Ricard Casas, Francisco J. Castander, Jorge L. Cervantes-Cota, Todd M. Claybaugh, Madeline Close, Carl T. Coker, Shaun Cole, Johan Comparat, Andrew P. Cooper, M. -C. Cousinou, Martin Crocce, Jean-Gabriel Cuby, Daniel P. Cunningham, Tamara M. Davis, Kyle S. Dawson, Axel de la Macorra, Juan De Vicente, Timothée Delubac, Mark Derwent, Arjun Dey, Govinda Dhungana, Zhejie Ding, Peter Doel, Yutong T. Duan, Anne Ealet, Jerry Edelstein, Sarah Eftekharzadeh, Daniel J. Eisenstein, Ann Elliott, Stéphanie Escoffier, Matthew Evatt, Parker Fagrelius, Xiaohui Fan, Kevin Fanning, Arya Farahi, Jay Farihi, Ginevra Favole, Yu Feng, Enrique Fernandez, Joseph R. Findlay, Douglas P. Finkbeiner, Michael J. Fitzpatrick, Brenna Flaugher, Samuel Flender, Andreu Font-Ribera, Jaime E. Forero-Romero, Pablo Fosalba, Carlos S. Frenk, Michele Fumagalli, Boris T. Gaensicke, Giuseppe Gallo, Juan Garcia-Bellido, Enrique Gaztanaga, Nicola Pietro Gentile Fusillo, Terry Gerard, Irena Gershkovich, Tommaso Giannantonio, Denis Gillet, Guillermo Gonzalez-de-Rivera, Violeta Gonzalez-Perez, Shelby Gott, Or Graur, Gaston Gutierrez, Julien Guy, Salman Habib, Henry Heetderks, Ian Heetderks, Katrin Heitmann, Wojciech A. Hellwing, David A. Herrera, Shirley Ho, Stephen Holland, Klaus Honscheid, Eric Huff, Timothy A. Hutchinson, Dragan Huterer, Ho Seong Hwang, Joseph Maria Illa Laguna, Yuzo Ishikawa, Dianna Jacobs, Niall Jeffrey, Patrick Jelinsky, Elise Jennings, Linhua Jiang, Jorge Jimenez, Jennifer Johnson, Richard Joyce, Eric Jullo, Stéphanie Juneau, Sami Kama, Armin Karcher, Sonia Karkar, Robert Kehoe, Noble Kennamer, Stephen Kent, Martin Kilbinger, Alex G. Kim, David Kirkby, Theodore Kisner, Ellie Kitanidis, Jean-Paul Kneib, Sergey Koposov, Eve Kovacs, Kazuya Koyama, Anthony Kremin, Richard Kron, Luzius Kronig, Andrea Kueter-Young, Cedric G. Lacey, Robin Lafever, Ofer Lahav, Andrew Lambert, Michael Lampton, Martin Landriau, Dustin Lang, Tod R. Lauer, Jean-Marc Le Goff, Laurent Le Guillou, Auguste Le Van Suu, Jae Hyeon Lee, Su-Jeong Lee, Daniela Leitner, Michael Lesser, Michael E. Levi, Benjamin L'Huillier, Baojiu Li, Ming Liang, Huan Lin, Eric Linder, Sarah R. Loebman, Zarija Lukić, Jun Ma, Niall MacCrann, Christophe Magneville, Laleh Makarem, Marc Manera, Christopher J. Manser, Robert Marshall, Paul Martini, Richard Massey, Thomas Matheson, Jeremy McCauley, Patrick McDonald, Ian D. McGreer, Aaron Meisner, Nigel Metcalfe, Timothy N. Miller, Ramon Miquel, John Moustakas, Adam Myers, Milind Naik, Jeffrey A. Newman, Robert C. Nichol, Andrina Nicola, Luiz Nicolati da Costa, Jundan Nie, Gustavo Niz, Peder Norberg, Brian Nord, Dara Norman, Peter Nugent, Thomas O'Brien, Minji Oh, Knut A. G. Olsen, Cristobal Padilla, Hamsa Padmanabhan, Nikhil Padmanabhan, Nathalie Palanque-Delabrouille, Antonella Palmese, Daniel Pappalardo, Isabelle Pâris, Changbom Park, Anna Patej, John A. Peacock, Hiranya V. Peiris, Xiyan Peng, Will J. Percival, Sandrine Perruchot, Matthew M. Pieri, Richard Pogge, Jennifer E. Pollack, Claire Poppett, Francisco Prada, Abhishek Prakash, Ronald G. Probst, David Rabinowitz, Anand Raichoor, Chang Hee Ree, Alexandre Refregier, Xavier Regal, Beth Reid, Kevin Reil, Mehdi Rezaie, Constance M. Rockosi, Natalie Roe, Samuel Ronayette, Aaron Roodman, Ashley J. Ross, Nicholas P. Ross, Graziano Rossi, Eduardo Rozo, Vanina Ruhlmann-Kleider, Eli S. Rykoff, Cristiano Sabiu, Lado Samushia, Eusebio Sanchez, Javier Sanchez, David J. Schlegel, Michael Schneider, Michael Schubnell, Aurélia Secroun, Uros Seljak, Hee-Jong Seo, Santiago Serrano, Arman Shafieloo, Huanyuan Shan, Ray Sharples, Michael J. Sholl, William V. Shourt, Joseph H. Silber, David R. Silva, Martin M. Sirk, Anze Slosar, Alex Smith, George F. Smoot, Debopam Som, Yong-Seon Song, David Sprayberry, Ryan Staten, Andy Stefanik, Gregory Tarle, Suk Sien Tie, Jeremy L. Tinker, Rita Tojeiro, Francisco Valdes, Octavio Valenzuela, Monica Valluri, Mariana Vargas-Magana, Licia Verde, Alistair R. Walker, Jiali Wang, Yuting Wang, Benjamin A. Weaver, Curtis Weaverdyck, Risa H. Wechsler, David H. Weinberg, Martin White, Qian Yang, Christophe Yeche, Tianmeng Zhang, Gong-Bo Zhao, Yi Zheng, Xu Zhou, Zhimin Zhou, Yaling Zhu, Hu Zou, Ying Zu

DESI (Dark Energy Spectropic Instrument) is a Stage IV ground-based dark energy experiment that will study baryon acoustic oscillations and the growth of structure through redshift-space distortions with a wide-area galaxy and quasar redshift survey. The DESI instrument is a robotically-actuated, fiber-fed spectrograph capable of taking up to 5,000 simultaneous spectra over a wavelength range from 360 nm to 980 nm. The fibers feed ten three-arm spectrographs with resolution $R= \lambda/\Delta\lambda$ between 2000 and 5500, depending on wavelength. Read More

We use weak-lensing shear measurements to determine the mean mass of optically selected galaxy clusters in Dark Energy Survey Science Verification data. In a blinded analysis, we split the sample of more than 8,000 redMaPPer clusters into 15 subsets, spanning ranges in the richness parameter $5 \leq \lambda \leq 180$ and redshift $0.2 \leq z \leq 0. Read More

Deep learning has been popularized by its recent successes on challenging artificial intelligence problems. One of the reasons for its dominance is also an ongoing challenge: the need for immense amounts of computational power. Hardware architects have responded by proposing a wide array of promising ideas, but to date, the majority of the work has focused on specific algorithms in somewhat narrow application domains. Read More

Cosmic shear is sensitive to fluctuations in the cosmological matter density field, including on small physical scales, where matter clustering is affected by baryonic physics in galaxies and galaxy clusters, such as star formation, supernovae feedback and AGN feedback. While muddying any cosmological information that is contained in small scale cosmic shear measurements, this does mean that cosmic shear has the potential to constrain baryonic physics and galaxy formation. We perform an analysis of the Dark Energy Survey (DES) Science Verification (SV) cosmic shear measurements, now extended to smaller scales, and using the Mead et al. Read More

The correlation between active galactic nuclei (AGN) and environment provides important clues to AGN fueling and the relationship of black hole growth to galaxy evolution. In this paper, we analyze the fraction of galaxies in clusters hosting AGN as a function of redshift and cluster richness for X-ray detected AGN associated with clusters of galaxies in Dark Energy Survey (DES) Science Verification data. The present sample includes 33 AGN with L_X > 10^43 ergs s^-1 in non-central, host galaxies with luminosity greater than 0. Read More

Recent observations from the Interface Region Imaging Spectrograph (IRIS) have discovered a new class of numerous low-lying dynamic loop structures, and it has been argued that they are the long-postulated unresolved fine structures (UFS) that dominate the emission of the solar transition region. In this letter, we combine IRIS measurements of the properties of a sample of 108 UFS (intensities, lengths, widths, lifetimes) with 1-D non-equilibrium ionization simulations using the HYDRAD hydrodynamic model to examine whether the UFS are now truly spatially resolved in the sense of being individual structures rather than composed of multiple magnetic threads. We find that a simulation of an impulsively heated single strand can reproduce most of the observed properties suggesting that the UFS may be resolved, and the distribution of UFS widths implies that they are structured on a spatial scale of 133km on average. Read More

2016Jun

We report the results of a Dark Energy Camera (DECam) optical follow-up of the gravitational wave (GW) event GW151226, discovered by the Advanced LIGO detectors. Our observations cover 28.8 deg$^2$ of the localization region in the $i$ and $z$ bands (containing 3% of the BAYESTAR localization probability), starting 10 hours after the event was announced and spanning four epochs at $2-24$ days after the GW detection. Read More

Fast (>700 km/s) and slow (~400 km/s) winds stream from the Sun, permeate the heliosphere and influence the near-Earth environment. While the fast wind is known to emanate primarily from polar coronal holes, the source of the slow wind remains unknown. Here we identify possible sites of origin using a slow solar wind source map of the entire Sun, which we construct from specially designed, full- disk observations from the Hinode satellite, and a magnetic field model. Read More

We study the Sunyaev-Zel'dovich effect (SZE) signature in South Pole Telescope (SPT) data for an ensemble of 719 optically identified galaxy clusters selected from 124.6 deg$^2$ of the Dark Energy Survey (DES) science verification data, detecting a stacked SZE signal down to richness $\lambda\sim20$. The SZE signature is measured using matched-filtered maps of the 2500 deg$^2$ SPT-SZ survey at the positions of the DES clusters, and the degeneracy between SZE observable and matched-filter size is broken by adopting as priors SZE and optical mass-observable relations that are either calibrated using SPT selected clusters or through the Arnaud et al. Read More

Galaxies and their dark matter halos populate a complicated filamentary network around large, nearly empty regions known as cosmic voids. Cosmic voids are usually identified in spectroscopic galaxy surveys, where 3D information about the large-scale structure of the Universe is available. Although an increasing amount of photometric data is being produced, its potential for void studies is limited since photometric redshifts induce line-of-sight position errors of $\sim50$ Mpc/$h$ or more that can render many voids undetectable. Read More

It is well known that the probability distribution function (PDF) of galaxy density contrast is approximately lognormal; whether the PDF of mass fluctuations derived from weak lensing convergence (kappa_WL) is lognormal is less well established. We derive PDFs of the galaxy and projected matter density distributions via the Counts in Cells (CiC) method. We use maps of galaxies and weak lensing convergence produced from the Dark Energy Survey (DES) Science Verification data over 139 deg^2. Read More

We present cosmological constraints from the Dark Energy Survey (DES) using a combined analysis of angular clustering of red galaxies and their cross-correlation with weak gravitational lensing of background galaxies. We use a 139 square degree contiguous patch of DES data from the Science Verification (SV) period of observations. Using large scale measurements, we constrain the matter density of the Universe as Omega_m = 0. Read More

Host galaxy identification is a crucial step for modern supernova (SN) surveys such as the Dark Energy Survey (DES) and the Large Synoptic Survey Telescope (LSST), which will discover SNe by the thousands. Spectroscopic resources are limited, so in the absence of real-time SN spectra these surveys must rely on host galaxy spectra to obtain accurate redshifts for the Hubble diagram and to improve photometric classification of SNe. In addition, SN luminosities are known to correlate with host-galaxy properties. Read More

We study the galaxy populations in 74 Sunyaev Zeldovich Effect (SZE) selected clusters from the South Pole Telescope (SPT) survey that have been imaged in the science verification phase of the Dark Energy Survey (DES). The sample extends up to $z\sim 1.1$ with $4 \times 10^{14} M_{\odot}\le M_{200}\le 3\times 10^{15} M_{\odot}$. Read More

We present galaxy-galaxy lensing results from 139 square degrees of Dark Energy Survey (DES) Science Verification (SV) data. Our lens sample consists of red galaxies, known as redMaGiC, which are specifically selected to have a low photometric redshift error and outlier rate. The lensing measurement has a total signal-to-noise of 29 over scales $0. Read More

2016Mar
Affiliations: 1The Dark Energy Survey Collaboration, 2The Dark Energy Survey Collaboration, 3The Dark Energy Survey Collaboration, 4The Dark Energy Survey Collaboration, 5The Dark Energy Survey Collaboration, 6The Dark Energy Survey Collaboration, 7The Dark Energy Survey Collaboration, 8The Dark Energy Survey Collaboration, 9The Dark Energy Survey Collaboration, 10The Dark Energy Survey Collaboration, 11The Dark Energy Survey Collaboration, 12The Dark Energy Survey Collaboration, 13The Dark Energy Survey Collaboration, 14The Dark Energy Survey Collaboration, 15The Dark Energy Survey Collaboration, 16The Dark Energy Survey Collaboration, 17The Dark Energy Survey Collaboration, 18The Dark Energy Survey Collaboration, 19The Dark Energy Survey Collaboration, 20The Dark Energy Survey Collaboration, 21The Dark Energy Survey Collaboration, 22The Dark Energy Survey Collaboration, 23The Dark Energy Survey Collaboration, 24The Dark Energy Survey Collaboration, 25The Dark Energy Survey Collaboration, 26The Dark Energy Survey Collaboration, 27The Dark Energy Survey Collaboration, 28The Dark Energy Survey Collaboration, 29The Dark Energy Survey Collaboration, 30The Dark Energy Survey Collaboration, 31The Dark Energy Survey Collaboration, 32The Dark Energy Survey Collaboration, 33The Dark Energy Survey Collaboration, 34The Dark Energy Survey Collaboration, 35The Dark Energy Survey Collaboration, 36The Dark Energy Survey Collaboration, 37The Dark Energy Survey Collaboration, 38The Dark Energy Survey Collaboration, 39The Dark Energy Survey Collaboration, 40The Dark Energy Survey Collaboration, 41The Dark Energy Survey Collaboration, 42The Dark Energy Survey Collaboration, 43The Dark Energy Survey Collaboration, 44The Dark Energy Survey Collaboration, 45The Dark Energy Survey Collaboration, 46The Dark Energy Survey Collaboration, 47The Dark Energy Survey Collaboration, 48The Dark Energy Survey Collaboration, 49The Dark Energy Survey Collaboration, 50The Dark Energy Survey Collaboration, 51The Dark Energy Survey Collaboration, 52The Dark Energy Survey Collaboration, 53The Dark Energy Survey Collaboration, 54The Dark Energy Survey Collaboration, 55The Dark Energy Survey Collaboration, 56The Dark Energy Survey Collaboration, 57The Dark Energy Survey Collaboration, 58The Dark Energy Survey Collaboration, 59The Dark Energy Survey Collaboration, 60The Dark Energy Survey Collaboration, 61The Dark Energy Survey Collaboration, 62The Dark Energy Survey Collaboration, 63The Dark Energy Survey Collaboration, 64The Dark Energy Survey Collaboration, 65The Dark Energy Survey Collaboration, 66The Dark Energy Survey Collaboration, 67The Dark Energy Survey Collaboration, 68The Dark Energy Survey Collaboration, 69The Dark Energy Survey Collaboration, 70The Dark Energy Survey Collaboration, 71The Dark Energy Survey Collaboration, 72The Dark Energy Survey Collaboration, 73The Dark Energy Survey Collaboration, 74The Dark Energy Survey Collaboration, 75The Dark Energy Survey Collaboration, 76The Dark Energy Survey Collaboration, 77The Dark Energy Survey Collaboration, 78The Dark Energy Survey Collaboration, 79The Dark Energy Survey Collaboration, 80The Dark Energy Survey Collaboration, 81The Dark Energy Survey Collaboration, 82The Dark Energy Survey Collaboration, 83The Dark Energy Survey Collaboration, 84The Dark Energy Survey Collaboration

Shear peak statistics has gained a lot of attention recently as a practical alternative to the two point statistics for constraining cosmological parameters. We perform a shear peak statistics analysis of the Dark Energy Survey (DES) Science Verification (SV) data, using weak gravitational lensing measurements from a 139 deg$^2$ field. We measure the abundance of peaks identified in aperture mass maps, as a function of their signal-to-noise ratio, in the signal-to-noise range $0<\mathcal S / \mathcal N<4$. Read More

We measure the correlation of galaxy lensing and cosmic microwave background lensing with a set of galaxies expected to trace the matter density field. The measurements are performed using pre-survey Dark Energy Survey (DES) Science Verification optical imaging data and millimeter-wave data from the 2500 square degree South Pole Telescope Sunyaev-Zel'dovich (SPT-SZ) survey. The two lensing-galaxy correlations are jointly fit to extract constraints on cosmological parameters, constraints on the redshift distribution of the lens galaxies, and constraints on the absolute shear calibration of DES galaxy lensing measurements. Read More

2016Jan
Affiliations: 1the DES Collaboration, 2the DES Collaboration, 3the DES Collaboration, 4the DES Collaboration, 5the DES Collaboration, 6the DES Collaboration, 7the DES Collaboration, 8the DES Collaboration, 9the DES Collaboration, 10the DES Collaboration, 11the DES Collaboration, 12the DES Collaboration, 13the DES Collaboration, 14the DES Collaboration, 15the DES Collaboration, 16the DES Collaboration, 17the DES Collaboration, 18the DES Collaboration, 19the DES Collaboration, 20the DES Collaboration, 21the DES Collaboration, 22the DES Collaboration, 23the DES Collaboration, 24the DES Collaboration, 25the DES Collaboration, 26the DES Collaboration, 27the DES Collaboration, 28the DES Collaboration, 29the DES Collaboration, 30the DES Collaboration, 31the DES Collaboration, 32the DES Collaboration, 33the DES Collaboration, 34the DES Collaboration, 35the DES Collaboration, 36the DES Collaboration, 37the DES Collaboration, 38the DES Collaboration, 39the DES Collaboration, 40the DES Collaboration, 41the DES Collaboration, 42the DES Collaboration, 43the DES Collaboration, 44the DES Collaboration, 45the DES Collaboration, 46the DES Collaboration, 47the DES Collaboration, 48the DES Collaboration, 49the DES Collaboration, 50the DES Collaboration, 51the DES Collaboration, 52the DES Collaboration, 53the DES Collaboration, 54the DES Collaboration, 55the DES Collaboration, 56the DES Collaboration, 57the DES Collaboration, 58the DES Collaboration, 59the DES Collaboration, 60the DES Collaboration, 61the DES Collaboration, 62the DES Collaboration, 63the DES Collaboration, 64the DES Collaboration, 65the DES Collaboration, 66the DES Collaboration, 67the DES Collaboration, 68the DES Collaboration, 69the DES Collaboration, 70the DES Collaboration, 71the DES Collaboration, 72the DES Collaboration, 73the DES Collaboration, 74the DES Collaboration, 75the DES Collaboration, 76the DES Collaboration, 77the DES Collaboration, 78the DES Collaboration, 79the DES Collaboration, 80the DES Collaboration, 81the DES Collaboration, 82the DES Collaboration, 83the DES Collaboration

We measure the redshift evolution of galaxy bias for a magnitude-limited galaxy sample by combining the galaxy density maps and weak lensing shear maps for a $\sim$116 deg$^{2}$ area of the Dark Energy Survey (DES) Science Verification data. This method was first developed in Amara et al. (2012) and later re-examined in a companion paper (Pujol et al. Read More

We describe updates to the \redmapper{} algorithm, a photometric red-sequence cluster finder specifically designed for large photometric surveys. The updated algorithm is applied to $150\,\mathrm{deg}^2$ of Science Verification (SV) data from the Dark Energy Survey (DES), and to the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) DR8 photometric data set. The DES SV catalog is locally volume limited, and contains 786 clusters with richness $\lambda>20$ (roughly equivalent to $M_{\rm{500c}}\gtrsim10^{14}\,h_{70}^{-1}\,M_{\odot}$) and $0. Read More

2016Jan
Authors: Dark Energy Survey Collaboration, T. Abbott, F. B. Abdalla, J. Aleksic, S. Allam, A. Amara, D. Bacon, E. Balbinot, M. Banerji, K. Bechtol, A. Benoit-Levy, G. M. Bernstein, E. Bertin, J. Blazek, C. Bonnett, S. Bridle, D. Brooks, R. J. Brunner, E. Buckley-Geer, D. L. Burke, G. B. Caminha, D. Capozzi, J. Carlsen, A. Carnero-Rosell, M. Carollo, M. Carrasco-Kind, J. Carretero, F. J. Castander, L. Clerkin, T. Collett, C. Conselice, M. Crocce, C. E. Cunha, C. B. D'Andrea, L. N. da Costa, T. M. Davis, S. Desai, H. T. Diehl, J. P. Dietrich, S. Dodelson, P. Doel, A. Drlica-Wagner, J. Estrada, J. Etherington, A. E. Evrard, J. Fabbri, D. A. Finley, B. Flaugher, R. J. Foley, P. Rosalba, J. Frieman, J. Garcia-Bellido, E. Gaztanaga, D. W. Gerdes, T. Giannantonio, D. A. Goldstein, D. Gruen, R. A. Gruendl, P. Guarnieri, G. Gutierrez, W. Hartley, K. Honscheid, B. Jain, D. J. James, T. Jeltema, S. Jouvel, R. Kessler, A. King, D. Kirk, R. Kron, K. Kuehn, N. Kuropatkin, O. Lahav, T. S. Li, M. Lima, H. Lin, M. A. G. Maia, M. Makler, M. Manera, C. Maraston, J. L. Marshall, P. Martini, R. G. McMahon, P. Melchior, A. Merson, C. J. Miller, R. Miquel, J. J. Mohr, X. Morice-Atkinson, K. Naidoo, E. Neilsen, R. C. Nichol, B. Nord, R. Ogando, F. Ostrovski, A. Palmese, A. Papadopoulos, H. Peiris, J. Peoples, W. J. Percival, A. A. Plazas, S. L. Reed, A. Refregier, A. K. Romer, A. Roodman, A. Ross, E. Rozo, E. S. Rykoff, I. Sadeh, M. Sako, C. Sanchez, E. Sanchez, B. Santiago, V. Scarpine, M. Schubnell, I. Sevilla-Noarbe, E. Sheldon, M. Smith, R. C. Smith, M. Soares-Santos, F. Sobreira, M. Soumagnac, E. Suchyta, M. Sullivan, M. Swanson, G. Tarle, J. Thaler, D. Thomas, R. C. Thomas, D. Tucker, J. D. Vieira, V. Vikram, A. R. Walker, R. H. Wechsler, J. Weller, W. Wester, L. Whiteway, H. Wilcox, B. Yanny, Y. Zhang, J. Zuntz

This overview article describes the legacy prospect and discovery potential of the Dark Energy Survey (DES) beyond cosmological studies, illustrating it with examples from the DES early data. DES is using a wide-field camera (DECam) on the 4m Blanco Telescope in Chile to image 5000 sq deg of the sky in five filters (grizY). By its completion the survey is expected to have generated a catalogue of 300 million galaxies with photometric redshifts and 100 million stars. Read More

Meeting the science goals for many current and future ground-based optical large-area sky surveys requires that the calibrated broadband photometry is stable in time and uniform over the sky to 1% precision or better. Past surveys have achieved photometric precision of 1-2% by calibrating the survey's stellar photometry with repeated measurements of a large number of stars observed in multiple epochs. The calibration techniques employed by these surveys only consider the relative frame-by-frame photometric zeropoint offset and the focal plane position-dependent illumination corrections, which are independent of the source color. Read More

2015Dec
Affiliations: 1the DES Collaboration, 2the DES Collaboration, 3the DES Collaboration, 4the DES Collaboration, 5the DES Collaboration, 6the DES Collaboration, 7the DES Collaboration, 8the DES Collaboration, 9the DES Collaboration, 10the DES Collaboration, 11the DES Collaboration, 12the DES Collaboration, 13the DES Collaboration, 14the DES Collaboration, 15the DES Collaboration, 16the DES Collaboration, 17the DES Collaboration, 18the DES Collaboration, 19the DES Collaboration, 20the DES Collaboration, 21the DES Collaboration, 22the DES Collaboration, 23the DES Collaboration, 24the DES Collaboration, 25the DES Collaboration, 26the DES Collaboration, 27the DES Collaboration, 28the DES Collaboration, 29the DES Collaboration, 30the DES Collaboration, 31the DES Collaboration, 32the DES Collaboration, 33the DES Collaboration, 34the DES Collaboration, 35the DES Collaboration, 36the DES Collaboration, 37the DES Collaboration, 38the DES Collaboration, 39the DES Collaboration, 40the DES Collaboration, 41the DES Collaboration, 42the DES Collaboration, 43the DES Collaboration, 44the DES Collaboration, 45the DES Collaboration, 46the DES Collaboration, 47the DES Collaboration, 48the DES Collaboration, 49the DES Collaboration, 50the DES Collaboration, 51the DES Collaboration, 52the DES Collaboration, 53the DES Collaboration, 54the DES Collaboration, 55the DES Collaboration, 56the DES Collaboration, 57the DES Collaboration, 58the DES Collaboration, 59the DES Collaboration, 60the DES Collaboration, 61the DES Collaboration, 62the DES Collaboration, 63the DES Collaboration, 64the DES Collaboration, 65the DES Collaboration, 66the DES Collaboration, 67the DES Collaboration, 68the DES Collaboration, 69the DES Collaboration, 70the DES Collaboration, 71the DES Collaboration, 72the DES Collaboration, 73the DES Collaboration, 74the DES Collaboration, 75the DES Collaboration, 76the DES Collaboration, 77the DES Collaboration, 78the DES Collaboration, 79the DES Collaboration, 80the DES Collaboration, 81the DES Collaboration, 82the DES Collaboration, 83the DES Collaboration, 84the DES Collaboration

We present DES14X3taz, a new hydrogen-poor super luminous supernova (SLSN-I) discovered by the Dark Energy Survey (DES) supernova program, with additional photometric data provided by the Survey Using DECam for Superluminous Supernovae (SUDSS). Spectra obtained using OSIRIS on the Gran Telescopio CANARIAS (GTC) show DES14X3taz is a SLSN-I at z=0.608. Read More

It is well established that elemental abundances vary in the solar atmosphere and that this variation is organized by first ionization potential (FIP). Previous studies have shown that in the solar corona low-FIP elements, such as Fe, Si, Mg, and Ca, are generally enriched relative to high-FIP elements, such as C, N, O, Ar, and Ne. In this paper we report on measurements of plasma composition made during impulsive heating events observed at transition region temperatures with the Extreme Ultraviolet Imaging Spectrometer (EIS) on Hinode. Read More

We measure the cross-correlation between weak lensing of galaxy images and of the cosmic microwave background (CMB). The effects of gravitational lensing on different sources will be correlated if the lensing is caused by the same mass fluctuations. We use galaxy shape measurements from 139 deg$^{2}$ of the Dark Energy Survey (DES) Science Verification data and overlapping CMB lensing from the South Pole Telescope (SPT) and Planck. Read More

We report the observation and confirmation of the first group- and cluster-scale strong gravitational lensing systems found in Dark Energy Survey (DES) data. Through visual inspection of data from the Science Verification (SV) season, we identified 53 candidate systems. We then obtained spectroscopic follow-up of 21 candidates using the Gemini Multi-Object Spectrograph (GMOS) at the Gemini South telescope and the Inamori-Magellan Areal Camera and Spectrograph (IMACS) at the Magellan/Baade telescope. Read More

The Large Magellanic Cloud (LMC) harbors a rich and diverse system of star clusters, whose ages, chemical abundances, and positions provide information about the LMC history of star formation. We use Science Verification imaging data from the Dark Energy Survey to increase the census of known star clusters in the outer LMC and to derive physical parameters for a large sample of such objects using a spatially and photometrically homogeneous data set. Our sample contains 255 visually identified cluster candidates, of which 109 were not listed in any previous catalog. Read More

We have developed a crowdsourcing web application for image quality control employed by the Dark Energy Survey. Dubbed the "DES exposure checker", it renders science-grade images directly to a web browser and allows users to mark problematic features from a set of predefined classes. Users can also generate custom labels and thus help identify previously unknown problem classes. Read More