C. Williams - Curtin University, Perth, Australia

C. Williams
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Name
C. Williams
Affiliation
Curtin University, Perth, Australia
City
Perth
Country
Australia

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Instrumentation and Methods for Astrophysics (15)
 
High Energy Physics - Experiment (11)
 
Cosmology and Nongalactic Astrophysics (10)
 
High Energy Physics - Phenomenology (10)
 
Astrophysics of Galaxies (9)
 
High Energy Astrophysical Phenomena (4)
 
Computer Science - Learning (2)
 
Mathematics - Number Theory (2)
 
Physics - Instrumentation and Detectors (2)
 
Nuclear Experiment (1)
 
Physics - Physics and Society (1)
 
Quantum Physics (1)
 
Physics - Atmospheric and Oceanic Physics (1)
 
Statistics - Machine Learning (1)
 
Mathematics - Mathematical Physics (1)
 
Physics - Materials Science (1)
 
Computer Science - Cryptography and Security (1)
 
Computer Science - Robotics (1)
 
Physics - Computational Physics (1)
 
Physics - Classical Physics (1)
 
Mathematics - Functional Analysis (1)
 
Mathematical Physics (1)
 
Solar and Stellar Astrophysics (1)

Publications Authored By C. Williams

This paper presents a system for mission planning for an autonomous underwater vehicle in time-varying ocean currents. The mission planning system is designed for the AUV "SLOCUM Glider" to collect oceanographic data along the Newfoundland and Labrador Shelf. The data will be used in conjunction with a numerical ocean model currently under development by the Department of Fisheries and Oceans Canada. Read More

The study of canonically complete attribute-based access control (ABAC) languages is relatively new. A canonically complete language is useful as it is functionally complete and provides a "normal form" for policies. However, previous work on canonically complete ABAC languages requires that the set of authorization decisions is totally ordered, which does not accurately reflect the intuition behind the use of the allow, deny and not-applicable decisions in access control. Read More

Graphene oxide membranes show exceptional molecular permeation properties, with a promise for many applications. However, their use in ion sieving and desalination technologies is limited by a permeation cutoff of ~9 Angstrom, which is larger than hydrated ion diameters for common salts. The cutoff is determined by the interlayer spacing d ~13. Read More

Radio astronomy has traditionally depended on observatories allocating time to observers for exclusive use of their telescopes. The disadvantage of this scheme is that the data thus collected is rarely used for other astronomy applications, and in many cases, is unsuitable. For example, properly calibrated pulsar search data can, with some reduction, be used for spectral line surveys. Read More

The solution of a nonlinear diffusion equation is numerically investigated using the generalized Fourier transform method. This equation includes fractal dimensions and power-law dependence on the radial variable and on the diffusion function. The generalized Fourier transform approach is the extension of the Fourier transform method used for normal diffusion equation. Read More

Many astronomical sources produce transient phenomena at radio frequencies, but the transient sky at low frequencies (<300 MHz) remains relatively unexplored. Blind surveys with new widefield radio instruments are setting increasingly stringent limits on the transient surface density on various timescales. Although many of these instruments are limited by classical confusion noise from an ensemble of faint, unresolved sources, one can in principle detect transients below the classical confusion limit to the extent that the classical confusion noise is independent of time. Read More

The development of supersymmetric (SUSY) quantum mechanics has shown that some of the insights based on the algebraic properties of ladder operators related to the quantum mechanical harmonic oscillator carry over to the study of more general systems. At this level of generality, pairs of eigenfunctions of so-called partner Hamiltonians are transformed into each other, but the entire spectrum of any one of them cannot be deduced from this intertwining relationship in general---except in special cases. In this paper, we present a more general structure that provides all eigenvalues for a class of Hamiltonians that do not factor into a pair of operators satisfying canonical commutation relations. Read More

We present the first calculation of direct photon production at next-to-next-to leading order (NNLO) accuracy in QCD. For this process, although the final state cuts mandate only the presence of a single electroweak boson, the underlying kinematics resembles that of a generic vector boson plus jet topology. In order to regulate the infrared singularities present at this order we use the $N$-jettiness slicing procedure, applied for the first time to a final state that at Born level includes colored partons but no required jet. Read More

Bedside monitors in Intensive Care Units (ICUs) frequently sound incorrectly, slowing response times and desensitising nurses to alarms (Chambrin, 2001), causing true alarms to be missed (Hug et al., 2011). We compare sliding window predictors with recurrent predictors to classify patient state-of-health from ICU multivariate time series; we report slightly improved performance for the RNN for three out of four targets. Read More

Using the Murchison Widefield Array (MWA), the low-frequency Square Kilometre Array (SKA1 LOW) precursor located in Western Australia, we have completed the GaLactic and Extragalactic All-sky MWA (GLEAM) survey, and present the resulting extragalactic catalogue, utilising the first year of observations. The catalogue covers 24,831 square degrees, over declinations south of $+30^\circ$ and Galactic latitudes outside $10^\circ$ of the Galactic plane, excluding some areas such as the Magellanic Clouds. It contains 307,455 radio sources with 20 separate flux density measurements across 72--231MHz, selected from a time- and frequency- integrated image centred at 200MHz, with a resolution of $\approx 2$'. Read More

2016Oct
Authors: D. de Florian1, C. Grojean2, F. Maltoni3, C. Mariotti4, A. Nikitenko5, M. Pieri6, P. Savard7, M. Schumacher8, R. Tanaka9, R. Aggleton10, M. Ahmad11, B. Allanach12, C. Anastasiou13, W. Astill14, S. Badger15, M. Badziak16, J. Baglio17, E. Bagnaschi18, A. Ballestrero19, A. Banfi20, D. Barducci21, M. Beckingham22, C. Becot23, G. Bélanger24, J. Bellm25, N. Belyaev26, F. U. Bernlochner27, C. Beskidt28, A. Biekötter29, F. Bishara30, W. Bizon31, N. E. Bomark32, M. Bonvini33, S. Borowka34, V. Bortolotto35, S. Boselli36, F. J. Botella37, R. Boughezal38, G. C. Branco39, J. Brehmer40, L. Brenner41, S. Bressler42, I. Brivio43, A. Broggio44, H. Brun45, G. Buchalla46, C. D. Burgard47, A. Calandri48, L. Caminada49, R. Caminal Armadans50, F. Campanario51, J. Campbell52, F. Caola53, C. M. Carloni Calame54, S. Carrazza55, A. Carvalho56, M. Casolino57, O. Cata58, A. Celis59, F. Cerutti60, N. Chanon61, M. Chen62, X. Chen63, B. Chokoufé Nejad64, N. Christensen65, M. Ciuchini66, R. Contino67, T. Corbett68, D. Curtin69, M. Dall'Osso70, A. David71, S. Dawson72, J. de Blas73, W. de Boer74, P. de Castro Manzano75, C. Degrande76, R. L. Delgado77, F. Demartin78, A. Denner79, B. Di Micco80, R. Di Nardo81, S. Dittmaier82, A. Dobado83, T. Dorigo84, F. A. Dreyer85, M. Dührssen86, C. Duhr87, F. Dulat88, K. Ecker89, K. Ellis90, U. Ellwanger91, C. Englert92, D. Espriu93, A. Falkowski94, L. Fayard95, R. Feger96, G. Ferrera97, A. Ferroglia98, N. Fidanza99, T. Figy100, M. Flechl101, D. Fontes102, S. Forte103, P. Francavilla104, E. Franco105, R. Frederix106, A. Freitas107, F. F. Freitas108, F. Frensch109, S. Frixione110, B. Fuks111, E. Furlan112, S. Gadatsch113, J. Gao114, Y. Gao115, M. V. Garzelli116, T. Gehrmann117, R. Gerosa118, M. Ghezzi119, D. Ghosh120, S. Gieseke121, D. Gillberg122, G. F. Giudice123, E. W. N. Glover124, F. Goertz125, D. Gonçalves126, J. Gonzalez-Fraile127, M. Gorbahn128, S. Gori129, C. A. Gottardo130, M. Gouzevitch131, P. Govoni132, D. Gray133, M. Grazzini134, N. Greiner135, A. Greljo136, J. Grigo137, A. V. Gritsan138, R. Gröber139, S. Guindon140, H. E. Haber141, C. Han142, T. Han143, R. Harlander144, M. A. Harrendorf145, H. B. Hartanto146, C. Hays147, S. Heinemeyer148, G. Heinrich149, M. Herrero150, F. Herzog151, B. Hespel152, V. Hirschi153, S. Hoeche154, S. Honeywell155, S. J. Huber156, C. Hugonie157, J. Huston158, A. Ilnicka159, G. Isidori160, B. Jäger161, M. Jaquier162, S. P. Jones163, A. Juste164, S. Kallweit165, A. Kaluza166, A. Kardos167, A. Karlberg168, Z. Kassabov169, N. Kauer170, D. I. Kazakov171, M. Kerner172, W. Kilian173, F. Kling174, K. Köneke175, R. Kogler176, R. Konoplich177, S. Kortner178, S. Kraml179, C. Krause180, F. Krauss181, M. Krawczyk182, A. Kulesza183, S. Kuttimalai184, R. Lane185, A. Lazopoulos186, G. Lee187, P. Lenzi188, I. M. Lewis189, Y. Li190, S. Liebler191, J. Lindert192, X. Liu193, Z. Liu194, F. J. Llanes-Estrada195, H. E. Logan196, D. Lopez-Val197, I. Low198, G. Luisoni199, P. Maierhöfer200, E. Maina201, B. Mansoulié202, H. Mantler203, M. Mantoani204, A. C. Marini205, V. I. Martinez Outschoorn206, S. Marzani207, D. Marzocca208, A. Massironi209, K. Mawatari210, J. Mazzitelli211, A. McCarn212, B. Mellado213, K. Melnikov214, S. B. Menari215, L. Merlo216, C. Meyer217, P. Milenovic218, K. Mimasu219, S. Mishima220, B. Mistlberger221, S. -O. Moch222, A. Mohammadi223, P. F. Monni224, G. Montagna225, M. Moreno Llácer226, N. Moretti227, S. Moretti228, L. Motyka229, A. Mück230, M. Mühlleitner231, S. Munir232, P. Musella233, P. Nadolsky234, D. Napoletano235, M. Nebot236, C. Neu237, M. Neubert238, R. Nevzorov239, O. Nicrosini240, J. Nielsen241, K. Nikolopoulos242, J. M. No243, C. O'Brien244, T. Ohl245, C. Oleari246, T. Orimoto247, D. Pagani248, C. E. Pandini249, A. Papaefstathiou250, A. S. Papanastasiou251, G. Passarino252, B. D. Pecjak253, M. Pelliccioni254, G. Perez255, L. Perrozzi256, F. Petriello257, G. Petrucciani258, E. Pianori259, F. Piccinini260, M. Pierini261, A. Pilkington262, S. Plätzer263, T. Plehn264, R. Podskubka265, C. T. Potter266, S. Pozzorini267, K. Prokofiev268, A. Pukhov269, I. Puljak270, M. Queitsch-Maitland271, J. Quevillon272, D. Rathlev273, M. Rauch274, E. Re275, M. N. Rebelo276, D. Rebuzzi277, L. Reina278, C. Reuschle279, J. Reuter280, M. Riembau281, F. Riva282, A. Rizzi283, T. Robens284, R. Röntsch285, J. Rojo286, J. C. Romão287, N. Rompotis288, J. Roskes289, R. Roth290, G. P. Salam291, R. Salerno292, R. Santos293, V. Sanz294, J. J. Sanz-Cillero295, H. Sargsyan296, U. Sarica297, P. Schichtel298, J. Schlenk299, T. Schmidt300, C. Schmitt301, M. Schönherr302, U. Schubert303, M. Schulze304, S. Sekula305, M. Sekulla306, E. Shabalina307, H. S. Shao308, J. Shelton309, C. H. Shepherd-Themistocleous310, S. Y. Shim311, F. Siegert312, A. Signer313, J. P. Silva314, L. Silvestrini315, M. Sjodahl316, P. Slavich317, M. Slawinska318, L. Soffi319, M. Spannowsky320, C. Speckner321, D. M. Sperka322, M. Spira323, O. Stål324, F. Staub325, T. Stebel326, T. Stefaniak327, M. Steinhauser328, I. W. Stewart329, M. J. Strassler330, J. Streicher331, D. M. Strom332, S. Su333, X. Sun334, F. J. Tackmann335, K. Tackmann336, A. M. Teixeira337, R. Teixeira de Lima338, V. Theeuwes339, R. Thorne340, D. Tommasini341, P. Torrielli342, M. Tosi343, F. Tramontano344, Z. Trócsányi345, M. Trott346, I. Tsinikos347, M. Ubiali348, P. Vanlaer349, W. Verkerke350, A. Vicini351, L. Viliani352, E. Vryonidou353, D. Wackeroth354, C. E. M. Wagner355, J. Wang356, S. Wayand357, G. Weiglein358, C. Weiss359, M. Wiesemann360, C. Williams361, J. Winter362, D. Winterbottom363, R. Wolf364, M. Xiao365, L. L. Yang366, R. Yohay367, S. P. Y. Yuen368, G. Zanderighi369, M. Zaro370, D. Zeppenfeld371, R. Ziegler372, T. Zirke373, J. Zupan374
Affiliations: 1eds., 2eds., 3eds., 4eds., 5eds., 6eds., 7eds., 8eds., 9eds., 10The LHC Higgs Cross Section Working Group, 11The LHC Higgs Cross Section Working Group, 12The LHC Higgs Cross Section Working Group, 13The LHC Higgs Cross Section Working Group, 14The LHC Higgs Cross Section Working Group, 15The LHC Higgs Cross Section Working Group, 16The LHC Higgs Cross Section Working Group, 17The LHC Higgs Cross Section Working Group, 18The LHC Higgs Cross Section Working Group, 19The LHC Higgs Cross Section Working Group, 20The LHC Higgs Cross Section Working Group, 21The LHC Higgs Cross Section Working Group, 22The LHC Higgs Cross Section Working Group, 23The LHC Higgs Cross Section Working Group, 24The LHC Higgs Cross Section Working Group, 25The LHC Higgs Cross Section Working Group, 26The LHC Higgs Cross Section Working Group, 27The LHC Higgs Cross Section Working Group, 28The LHC Higgs Cross Section Working Group, 29The LHC Higgs Cross Section Working Group, 30The LHC Higgs Cross 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This Report summarizes the results of the activities of the LHC Higgs Cross Section Working Group in the period 2014-2016. The main goal of the working group was to present the state-of-the-art of Higgs physics at the LHC, integrating all new results that have appeared in the last few years. The first part compiles the most up-to-date predictions of Higgs boson production cross sections and decay branching ratios, parton distribution functions, and off-shell Higgs boson production and interference effects. Read More

The Detection of redshifted 21 cm emission from the epoch of reionization (EoR) is a challenging task owing to strong foregrounds that dominate the signal. In this paper, we propose a general method, based on the delay spectrum approach, to extract HI power spectra that is applicable to tracking observations using an imaging radio interferometer (Delay Spectrum with Imaging Arrays (DSIA)). Our method is based on modelling the HI signal taking into account the impact of wide field effects such as the $w$-term which are then used as appropriate weights in cross-correlating the measured visibilities. Read More

We consider the problem of designing a variety of "system guided" basis sets for quantum mechanical anharmonic oscillators. Using ideas based on supersymmetric quantum mechanics, we design canonical transformations of the usual position and momentum to generate generalized "Cartesian-like positions, W and momenta, p_W" with unit Poisson brackets. These are quantized following Dirac, leading to an infinite family of potential "operator observables". Read More

We present a calculation of $H+j$ at NLO including the effect of a finite top-mass. Where possible we include the complete dependence on $m_t$. This includes the leading order amplitude, the infrared poles of the two-loop amplitude and the real radiation amplitude. Read More

The Murchison Widefield Array (MWA) has collected hundreds of hours of Epoch of Reionization (EoR) data and now faces the challenge of overcoming foreground and systematic contamination to reduce the data to a cosmological measurement. We introduce several novel analysis techniques such as cable reflection calibration, hyper-resolution gridding kernels, diffuse foreground model subtraction, and quality control methods. Each change to the analysis pipeline is tested against a two dimensional power spectrum figure of merit to demonstrate improvement. Read More

We present a non-linear dynamical system for modelling the effect of drug infusions on the vital signs of patients admitted in Intensive Care Units (ICUs). More specifically we are interested in modelling the effect of a widely used anaesthetic drug (Propofol) on a patient's monitored depth of anaesthesia and haemodynamics. We compare our approach with one from the Pharmacokinetics/Pharmacodynamics (PK/PD) literature and show that we can provide significant improvements in performance without requiring the incorporation of expert physiological knowledge in our system. Read More

We present deep polarimetric observations at 154 MHz with the Murchison Widefield Array (MWA), covering 625 deg^2 centered on RA=0 h, Dec=-27 deg. The sensitivity available in our deep observations allows an in-band, frequency-dependent analysis of polarized structure for the first time at long wavelengths. Our analysis suggests that the polarized structures are dominated by intrinsic emission but may also have a foreground Faraday screen component. Read More

Detection of the Epoch of Reionization HI signal requires a precise understanding of the intervening galaxies and AGN, both for instrumental calibration and foreground removal. We present a catalogue of 7394 extragalactic sources at 182 MHz detected in the RA=0 field of the Murchison Widefield Array Epoch of Reionization observation programme. Motivated by unprecedented requirements for precision and reliability we develop new methods for source finding and selection. Read More

Infrared-faint radio sources (IFRS) are a class of radio-loud (RL) active galactic nuclei (AGN) at high redshifts (z > 1.7) that are characterised by their relative infrared faintness, resulting in enormous radio-to-infrared flux density ratios of up to several thousand. We aim to test the hypothesis that IFRS are young AGN, particularly GHz peaked-spectrum (GPS) and compact steep-spectrum (CSS) sources that have a low frequency turnover. Read More

Early quiescent galaxies at z~2 are known to be remarkably compact compared to their nearby counterparts. Possible progenitors of these systems include galaxies that are structurally similar, but are still rapidly forming stars. Here, we present Karl G. Read More

2016Jun

This report summarises the physics opportunities in the search and study of physics beyond the Standard Model at a 100 TeV pp collider. Read More

We present the implementation of several color-singlet final-state processes at Next-to-Next-to Leading Order (NNLO) accuracy in QCD to the publicly available parton-level Monte Carlo program MCFM. Specifically we discuss the processes $pp\rightarrow H$, $pp\rightarrow Z$, $pp\rightarrow W$, $pp\rightarrow HZ$, $pp\rightarrow HW$ and $pp\rightarrow\gamma\gamma$. Decays of the unstable bosons are fully included, resulting in a flexible fully differential Monte Carlo code. Read More

We present the 21 cm power spectrum analysis approach of the Murchison Widefield Array Epoch of Reionization project. In this paper, we compare the outputs of multiple pipelines for the purpose of validating statistical limits cosmological hydrogen at redshifts between 6 and 12. Multiple, independent, data calibration and reduction pipelines are used to make power spectrum limits on a fiducial night of data. Read More

This Report summarizes the proceedings of the 2015 Les Houches workshop on Physics at TeV Colliders. Session 1 dealt with (I) new developments relevant for high precision Standard Model calculations, (II) the new PDF4LHC parton distributions, (III) issues in the theoretical description of the production of Standard Model Higgs bosons and how to relate experimental measurements, (IV) a host of phenomenological studies essential for comparing LHC data from Run I with theoretical predictions and projections for future measurements in Run II, and (V) new developments in Monte Carlo event generators. Read More

We have compiled a catalogue of HII regions detected with the Murchison Widefield Array (MWA) between 72 and 231MHz. The multiple frequency bands provided by the MWA allow us identify the characteristic spectrum generated by the thermal Bremsstrahlung process in HII regions. We detect 302 HII regions between 260 < l < 340 and report on the positions, sizes, peak, integrated flux density, and spectral indices of these HII regions. Read More

Increases in atmospheric CO2 and CH4 result from a combination of forcing from anthropogenic emissions and Earth System feedbacks that reduce or amplify the effects of those emissions on atmospheric concentrations. Despite decades of research carbon-climate feedbacks remain poorly quantified. The impact of these uncertainties on future climate are of increasing concern, especially in the wake of recent climate negotiations. Read More

In this paper we present a next-to-next-to-leading order (NNLO) calculation of the process $pp\rightarrow \gamma\gamma$ that we have implemented into the parton level Monte Carlo code MCFM. We do not find agreement with the previous calculation of this process in the literature. In addition to the $\mathcal{O}(\alpha_s^2)$ corrections present at NNLO, we include some effects arising at $\mathcal{O}(\alpha_s^3)$, namely those associated with gluon-initiated closed fermion loops. Read More

Low-frequency radio arrays are opening a new window for the study of the sky, both to study new phenomena and to better characterize known source classes. Being flat-spectrum sources, blazars are so far poorly studied at low radio frequencies. We characterize the spectral properties of the blazar population at low radio frequency compare the radio and high-energy properties of the gamma-ray blazar population, and search for radio counterparts of unidentified gamma-ray sources. Read More

We present a survey for transient and variable sources, on timescales from 28 seconds to $\sim$1 year, using the Murchison Widefield Array (MWA) at 182 MHz. Down to a detection threshold of 0.285 Jy, no transient candidates were identified, making this the most constraining low-frequency survey to date and placing a limit on the surface density of transients of $<4. Read More

In this paper, we present a generalisation of a theorem of David and Rob Pollack. In 'A construction of rigid analytic cohomology classes for congruence subgroups of SL(3,Z)', they give a very general argument for lifting ordinary eigenclasses (with respect to a suitable operator) in the group cohomology of certain arithmetic groups. With slightly tighter conditions, we prove the same result for non-ordinary classes. Read More

Since Rob Pollack and Glenn Stevens used overconvergent modular symbols to construct p-adic L-functions for non-critical slope rational modular forms, the theory has been extended to construct p-adic L-functions for non-critical slope automorphic forms over totally real and imaginary quadratic fields by the first and second authors respectively. In this paper, we give an analogous construction over a general number field. In particular, we start by proving a control theorem stating that the specialisation map from overconvergent to classical modular symbols is an isomorphism on the small slope subspace. Read More

Accurate antenna beam models are critical for radio observations aiming to isolate the redshifted 21cm spectral line emission from the Dark Ages and the Epoch of Reionization and unlock the scientific potential of 21cm cosmology. Past work has focused on characterizing mean antenna beam models using either satellite signals or astronomical sources as calibrators, but antenna-to-antenna variation due to imperfect instrumentation has remained unexplored. We characterize this variation for the Murchison Widefield Array (MWA) through laboratory measurements and simulations, finding typical deviations of order +/- 10-20% near the edges of the main lobe and in the sidelobes. Read More

Fast Radio Bursts (FRBs) are apparently one-time, relatively bright radio pulses that have been observed in recent years. The origin of FRBs is currently unknown and many instruments are being built to detect more of these bursts to better characterize their physical properties and identify the source population. ALFABURST is one such instrument. Read More

In this paper we present observations, simulations, and analysis demonstrating the direct connection between the location of foreground emission on the sky and its location in cosmological power spectra from interferometric redshifted 21 cm experiments. We begin with a heuristic formalism for understanding the mapping of sky coordinates into the cylindrically averaged power spectra measurements used by 21 cm experiments, with a focus on the effects of the instrument beam response and the associated sidelobes. We then demonstrate this mapping by analyzing power spectra with both simulated and observed data from the Murchison Widefield Array. Read More

Detection of the cosmological neutral hydrogen signal from the Epoch of Reionization, and estimation of its basic physical parameters, is the principal scientific aim of many current low-frequency radio telescopes. Here we describe the Cosmological HI Power Spectrum Estimator (CHIPS), an algorithm developed and implemented with data from the Murchison Widefield Array (MWA), to compute the two-dimensional and spherically-averaged power spectrum of brightness temperature fluctuations. The principal motivations for CHIPS are the application of realistic instrumental and foreground models to form the optimal estimator, thereby maximising the likelihood of unbiased signal estimation, and allowing a full covariant understanding of the outputs. Read More

In this paper we present a Next-to-Next-to Leading Order (NNLO) calculation of the production of a Higgs boson in association with a massive vector boson. We include the decays of the unstable Higgs and vector bosons, resulting in a fully flexible parton-level Monte Carlo implementation. We also include all $\mathcal{O}(\alpha_s^2)$ contributions that occur in production for these processes: those mediated by the exchange of a single off-shell vector boson in the $s$-channel, and those which arise from the coupling of the Higgs boson to a closed loop of fermions. Read More

The Precision Reactor Oscillation and Spectrum Experiment, PROSPECT, is designed to make a precise measurement of the antineutrino spectrum from a highly-enriched uranium reactor and probe eV-scale sterile neutrinos by searching for neutrino oscillations over meter-long distances. PROSPECT is conceived as a 2-phase experiment utilizing segmented $^6$Li-doped liquid scintillator detectors for both efficient detection of reactor antineutrinos through the inverse beta decay reaction and excellent background discrimination. PROSPECT Phase I consists of a movable 3-ton antineutrino detector at distances of 7 - 12 m from the reactor core. Read More

We present predictions for the associated production of a Higgs boson at NLO+PS accuracy, including the effect of anomalous interactions between the Higgs and gauge bosons. We present our results in different frameworks, one in which the interaction vertex between the Higgs boson and Standard Model $W$ and $Z$ bosons is parameterized in terms of general Lorentz structures, and one in which Electroweak symmetry breaking is manifestly linear and the resulting operators arise through a six-dimensional effective field theory framework. We present analytic calculations of the Standard Model and Beyond the Standard Model contributions, and discuss the phenomenological impact of the higher order pieces. Read More

Astronomers in CANDELS outline changes for the academic system to promote a smooth transition for junior scientists from academia to industry. Read More

Fast radio bursts (FRBs) constitute an emerging class of fast radio transient whose origin continues to be a mystery. Realizing the importance of increasing coverage of the search parameter space, we have designed, built, and deployed a realtime monitor for FRBs at the 305-m Arecibo radio telescope. Named 'ALFABURST', it is a commensal instrument that is triggered whenever the 1. Read More

We present the results of a pilot study search for Fast Radio Bursts (FRBs) using the Murchison Widefield Array (MWA) at low frequencies (139 - 170 MHz). We utilised MWA data obtained in a routine imaging mode from observations where the primary target was a field being studied for Epoch of Reionisation detection. We formed images with 2 second time resolution and 1. Read More

We investigate the reach of the LHC Run 2 and that of a future circular hadron collider with up to 100 TeV centre of mass energy for the exploration of potential Dark Matter sectors. These dark sectors are conveniently and broadly described by simplified models. The simplified models we consider provide microscopic descriptions of interactions between the Standard Model partons and the dark sector particles mediated by the four basic types of messenger fields: scalar, pseudo-scalar, vector or axial-vector. Read More

2015Aug
Affiliations: 1The PROSPECT Collaboration, 2The PROSPECT Collaboration, 3The PROSPECT Collaboration, 4The PROSPECT Collaboration, 5The PROSPECT Collaboration, 6The PROSPECT Collaboration, 7The PROSPECT Collaboration, 8The PROSPECT Collaboration, 9The PROSPECT Collaboration, 10The PROSPECT Collaboration, 11The PROSPECT Collaboration, 12The PROSPECT Collaboration, 13The PROSPECT Collaboration, 14The PROSPECT Collaboration, 15The PROSPECT Collaboration, 16The PROSPECT Collaboration, 17The PROSPECT Collaboration, 18The PROSPECT Collaboration, 19The PROSPECT Collaboration, 20The PROSPECT Collaboration, 21The PROSPECT Collaboration, 22The PROSPECT Collaboration, 23The PROSPECT Collaboration, 24The PROSPECT Collaboration, 25The PROSPECT Collaboration, 26The PROSPECT Collaboration, 27The PROSPECT Collaboration, 28The PROSPECT Collaboration, 29The PROSPECT Collaboration, 30The PROSPECT Collaboration, 31The PROSPECT Collaboration, 32The PROSPECT Collaboration, 33The PROSPECT Collaboration, 34The PROSPECT Collaboration, 35The PROSPECT Collaboration, 36The PROSPECT Collaboration, 37The PROSPECT Collaboration, 38The PROSPECT Collaboration, 39The PROSPECT Collaboration, 40The PROSPECT Collaboration, 41The PROSPECT Collaboration, 42The PROSPECT Collaboration, 43The PROSPECT Collaboration, 44The PROSPECT Collaboration, 45The PROSPECT Collaboration, 46The PROSPECT Collaboration, 47The PROSPECT Collaboration, 48The PROSPECT Collaboration, 49The PROSPECT Collaboration, 50The PROSPECT Collaboration, 51The PROSPECT Collaboration, 52The PROSPECT Collaboration, 53The PROSPECT Collaboration, 54The PROSPECT Collaboration, 55The PROSPECT Collaboration, 56The PROSPECT Collaboration, 57The PROSPECT Collaboration, 58The PROSPECT Collaboration, 59The PROSPECT Collaboration, 60The PROSPECT Collaboration, 61The PROSPECT Collaboration, 62The PROSPECT Collaboration, 63The PROSPECT Collaboration, 64The PROSPECT Collaboration, 65The PROSPECT Collaboration, 66The PROSPECT Collaboration

A meter-long, 23-liter EJ-309 liquid scintillator detector has been constructed to study the light collection and pulse-shape discrimination performance of elongated scintillator cells for the PROSPECT reactor antineutrino experiment. The magnitude and uniformity of light collection and neutron/gamma discrimination power in the energy range of antineutrino inverse beta decay products have been studied using gamma and spontaneous fission calibration sources deployed along the cell long axis. We also study neutron-gamma discrimination and light collection abilities for differing PMT and reflector configurations. Read More