C. WeiSS

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High Energy Physics - Phenomenology (24)
 
Nuclear Experiment (12)
 
Nuclear Theory (9)
 
High Energy Physics - Experiment (8)
 
Physics - Instrumentation and Detectors (5)
 
Physics - Statistical Mechanics (5)
 
Quantum Physics (5)
 
Physics - Atomic Physics (2)
 
Physics - Optics (1)
 
Computer Science - Other (1)
 
High Energy Physics - Lattice (1)
 
Computer Science - Information Theory (1)
 
Nonlinear Sciences - Pattern Formation and Solitons (1)
 
Statistics - Machine Learning (1)
 
Statistics - Methodology (1)
 
Mathematics - Information Theory (1)

Publications Authored By C. WeiSS

We discuss top-quark physics at the ILC with a focus on the full off-shell processes for $t\bar{t}$ and $t\bar{t}H$ production, including top-quark decays and also leptonic $W$ decays. A special focus is on the matching of the resummed vNRQCD threshold calculation and the fixed-order NLO QCD continuum calculation, where we present an update on the validation of the matching. All of the calculations have been performed in the \wz event generator framework. Read More

The baryon electromagnetic form factors are expressed in terms of two-dimensional densities describing the distribution of charge and magnetization in transverse space at fixed light-front time. We calculate the transverse densities of the spin-1/2 flavor-octet baryons at peripheral distances b = O(M_\pi^{-1}) using methods of relativistic chiral effective field theory (\chi EFT) and dispersion analysis. The densities are represented as dispersive integrals over the imaginary parts of the form factors in the timelike region (spectral functions). Read More

Transverse densities describe the distribution of charge and current at fixed light-front time and provide a frame-independent spatial representation of hadrons as relativistic systems. We calculate the transverse densities of the octet baryons at peripheral distances b = O(M_pi^{-1}) in an approach combining chiral effective field theory (ChEFT) and dispersion analysis. The densities are represented as dispersive integrals of the imaginary parts of the baryon electromagnetic form factors in the timelike region (spectral functions). Read More

When an interaction quench by a factor of four is applied to an attractive Bose-Einstein condensate, a higher-order quantum bright soliton exhibiting robust oscillations is predicted in the semiclassical limit by the Gross-Pitaevskii equation. Combining matrix-product state simulations of the Bose-Hubbard Hamiltonian with analytical treatment via the Lieb-Liniger model and the eigenstate thermalization hypothesis, we show these oscillations are absent. Instead, one obtains a large stationary soliton core with a small thermal cloud, a smoking-gun signal for non-semiclassical behavior on macroscopic scales and therefore a fully quantum emergent phenomenon. Read More

2016Dec

The aim of this work is to provide a precise and accurate measurement of the 238U(n,g) reaction cross section in the energy region from 1 eV to 700 keV. This reaction is of fundamental importance for the design calculations of nuclear reactors, governing the behaviour of the reactor core. In particular, fast reactors, which are experiencing a growing interest for their ability to burn radioactive waste, operate in the high energy region of the neutron spectrum. Read More

Contrary to many other translationally invariant one-dimensional models, the low-temperature phase for an attractively interacting one-dimensional Bose-gas (a quantum bright soliton) is stable against thermal fluctuations. However, treating the thermal properties of quantum bright solitons within the canonical ensemble leads to anomalous fluctuations of the total energy that indicate that canonical and micro-canonical ensembles are not equivalent. State-of-the-art experiments are best described by the micro-canonical ensemble, within which we predict a co-existence between single atoms and solitons even in the thermodynamic limit - contrary to strong predictions based on both the Landau hypothesis and the canonical ensemble. Read More

In typical one-dimensional models the Mermin-Wagner theorem forbids long range order, thus preventing finite-temperature phase transitions. We find a finite-temperature phase transition for a homogeneous system of attractive bosons in one dimension. The low-temperature phase is characterized by a quantum bright soliton without long range order; the high-temperature phase is a free gas. Read More

An Electron-Ion Collider (EIC) with center-of-mass energies sqrt(s_{eN}) ~ 20-100 GeV and luminosity L ~ 10^{34} cm^{-2} s^{-1} would offer new opportunities to study heavy quark production in high-energy electron or photon scattering on protons and nuclei. We report about an R&D project exploring the feasibility of direct measurements of nuclear gluon densities at large x (gluonic EMC effect, antishadowing) using open charm production at EIC. We describe the charm production rates and angle-momentum distributions at large x and discuss methods of charm reconstruction using next-generation detector capabilities (pi/K identification, vertex reconstruction). Read More

2016Oct
Authors: D. de Florian1, C. Grojean2, F. Maltoni3, C. Mariotti4, A. Nikitenko5, M. Pieri6, P. Savard7, M. Schumacher8, R. Tanaka9, R. Aggleton10, M. Ahmad11, B. Allanach12, C. Anastasiou13, W. Astill14, S. Badger15, M. Badziak16, J. Baglio17, E. Bagnaschi18, A. Ballestrero19, A. Banfi20, D. Barducci21, M. Beckingham22, C. Becot23, G. Bélanger24, J. Bellm25, N. Belyaev26, F. U. Bernlochner27, C. Beskidt28, A. Biekötter29, F. Bishara30, W. Bizon31, N. E. Bomark32, M. Bonvini33, S. Borowka34, V. Bortolotto35, S. Boselli36, F. J. Botella37, R. Boughezal38, G. C. Branco39, J. Brehmer40, L. Brenner41, S. Bressler42, I. Brivio43, A. Broggio44, H. Brun45, G. Buchalla46, C. D. Burgard47, A. Calandri48, L. Caminada49, R. Caminal Armadans50, F. Campanario51, J. Campbell52, F. Caola53, C. M. Carloni Calame54, S. Carrazza55, A. Carvalho56, M. Casolino57, O. Cata58, A. Celis59, F. Cerutti60, N. Chanon61, M. Chen62, X. Chen63, B. Chokoufé Nejad64, N. Christensen65, M. Ciuchini66, R. Contino67, T. Corbett68, D. Curtin69, M. Dall'Osso70, A. David71, S. Dawson72, J. de Blas73, W. de Boer74, P. de Castro Manzano75, C. Degrande76, R. L. Delgado77, F. Demartin78, A. Denner79, B. Di Micco80, R. Di Nardo81, S. Dittmaier82, A. Dobado83, T. Dorigo84, F. A. Dreyer85, M. Dührssen86, C. Duhr87, F. Dulat88, K. Ecker89, K. Ellis90, U. Ellwanger91, C. Englert92, D. Espriu93, A. Falkowski94, L. Fayard95, R. Feger96, G. Ferrera97, A. Ferroglia98, N. Fidanza99, T. Figy100, M. Flechl101, D. Fontes102, S. Forte103, P. Francavilla104, E. Franco105, R. Frederix106, A. Freitas107, F. F. Freitas108, F. Frensch109, S. Frixione110, B. Fuks111, E. Furlan112, S. Gadatsch113, J. Gao114, Y. Gao115, M. V. Garzelli116, T. Gehrmann117, R. Gerosa118, M. Ghezzi119, D. Ghosh120, S. Gieseke121, D. Gillberg122, G. F. Giudice123, E. W. N. Glover124, F. Goertz125, D. Gonçalves126, J. Gonzalez-Fraile127, M. Gorbahn128, S. Gori129, C. A. Gottardo130, M. Gouzevitch131, P. Govoni132, D. Gray133, M. Grazzini134, N. Greiner135, A. Greljo136, J. Grigo137, A. V. Gritsan138, R. Gröber139, S. Guindon140, H. E. Haber141, C. Han142, T. Han143, R. Harlander144, M. A. Harrendorf145, H. B. Hartanto146, C. Hays147, S. Heinemeyer148, G. Heinrich149, M. Herrero150, F. Herzog151, B. Hespel152, V. Hirschi153, S. Hoeche154, S. Honeywell155, S. J. Huber156, C. Hugonie157, J. Huston158, A. Ilnicka159, G. Isidori160, B. Jäger161, M. Jaquier162, S. P. Jones163, A. Juste164, S. Kallweit165, A. Kaluza166, A. Kardos167, A. Karlberg168, Z. Kassabov169, N. Kauer170, D. I. Kazakov171, M. Kerner172, W. Kilian173, F. Kling174, K. Köneke175, R. Kogler176, R. Konoplich177, S. Kortner178, S. Kraml179, C. Krause180, F. Krauss181, M. Krawczyk182, A. Kulesza183, S. Kuttimalai184, R. Lane185, A. Lazopoulos186, G. Lee187, P. Lenzi188, I. M. Lewis189, Y. Li190, S. Liebler191, J. Lindert192, X. Liu193, Z. Liu194, F. J. Llanes-Estrada195, H. E. Logan196, D. Lopez-Val197, I. Low198, G. Luisoni199, P. Maierhöfer200, E. Maina201, B. Mansoulié202, H. Mantler203, M. Mantoani204, A. C. Marini205, V. I. Martinez Outschoorn206, S. Marzani207, D. Marzocca208, A. Massironi209, K. Mawatari210, J. Mazzitelli211, A. McCarn212, B. Mellado213, K. Melnikov214, S. B. Menari215, L. Merlo216, C. Meyer217, P. Milenovic218, K. Mimasu219, S. Mishima220, B. Mistlberger221, S. -O. Moch222, A. Mohammadi223, P. F. Monni224, G. Montagna225, M. Moreno Llácer226, N. Moretti227, S. Moretti228, L. Motyka229, A. Mück230, M. Mühlleitner231, S. Munir232, P. Musella233, P. Nadolsky234, D. Napoletano235, M. Nebot236, C. Neu237, M. Neubert238, R. Nevzorov239, O. Nicrosini240, J. Nielsen241, K. Nikolopoulos242, J. M. No243, C. O'Brien244, T. Ohl245, C. Oleari246, T. Orimoto247, D. Pagani248, C. E. Pandini249, A. Papaefstathiou250, A. S. Papanastasiou251, G. Passarino252, B. D. Pecjak253, M. Pelliccioni254, G. Perez255, L. Perrozzi256, F. Petriello257, G. Petrucciani258, E. Pianori259, F. Piccinini260, M. Pierini261, A. Pilkington262, S. Plätzer263, T. Plehn264, R. Podskubka265, C. T. Potter266, S. Pozzorini267, K. Prokofiev268, A. Pukhov269, I. Puljak270, M. Queitsch-Maitland271, J. Quevillon272, D. Rathlev273, M. Rauch274, E. Re275, M. N. Rebelo276, D. Rebuzzi277, L. Reina278, C. Reuschle279, J. Reuter280, M. Riembau281, F. Riva282, A. Rizzi283, T. Robens284, R. Röntsch285, J. Rojo286, J. C. Romão287, N. Rompotis288, J. Roskes289, R. Roth290, G. P. Salam291, R. Salerno292, R. Santos293, V. Sanz294, J. J. Sanz-Cillero295, H. Sargsyan296, U. Sarica297, P. Schichtel298, J. Schlenk299, T. Schmidt300, C. Schmitt301, M. Schönherr302, U. Schubert303, M. Schulze304, S. Sekula305, M. Sekulla306, E. Shabalina307, H. S. Shao308, J. Shelton309, C. H. Shepherd-Themistocleous310, S. Y. Shim311, F. Siegert312, A. Signer313, J. P. Silva314, L. Silvestrini315, M. Sjodahl316, P. Slavich317, M. Slawinska318, L. Soffi319, M. Spannowsky320, C. Speckner321, D. M. Sperka322, M. Spira323, O. Stål324, F. Staub325, T. Stebel326, T. Stefaniak327, M. Steinhauser328, I. W. Stewart329, M. J. Strassler330, J. Streicher331, D. M. Strom332, S. Su333, X. Sun334, F. J. Tackmann335, K. Tackmann336, A. M. Teixeira337, R. Teixeira de Lima338, V. Theeuwes339, R. Thorne340, D. Tommasini341, P. Torrielli342, M. Tosi343, F. Tramontano344, Z. Trócsányi345, M. Trott346, I. Tsinikos347, M. Ubiali348, P. Vanlaer349, W. Verkerke350, A. Vicini351, L. Viliani352, E. Vryonidou353, D. Wackeroth354, C. E. M. Wagner355, J. Wang356, S. Wayand357, G. Weiglein358, C. Weiss359, M. Wiesemann360, C. Williams361, J. Winter362, D. Winterbottom363, R. Wolf364, M. Xiao365, L. L. Yang366, R. Yohay367, S. P. Y. Yuen368, G. Zanderighi369, M. Zaro370, D. Zeppenfeld371, R. Ziegler372, T. Zirke373, J. Zupan374
Affiliations: 1eds., 2eds., 3eds., 4eds., 5eds., 6eds., 7eds., 8eds., 9eds., 10The LHC Higgs Cross Section Working Group, 11The LHC Higgs Cross Section Working Group, 12The LHC Higgs Cross Section Working Group, 13The LHC Higgs Cross Section Working Group, 14The LHC Higgs Cross Section Working Group, 15The LHC Higgs Cross Section Working Group, 16The LHC Higgs Cross Section Working Group, 17The LHC Higgs Cross Section Working Group, 18The LHC Higgs Cross Section Working Group, 19The LHC Higgs Cross Section Working Group, 20The LHC Higgs Cross Section Working Group, 21The LHC Higgs Cross Section Working Group, 22The LHC Higgs Cross Section Working Group, 23The LHC Higgs Cross Section Working Group, 24The LHC Higgs Cross Section Working Group, 25The LHC Higgs Cross Section Working Group, 26The LHC Higgs Cross Section Working Group, 27The LHC Higgs Cross Section Working Group, 28The LHC Higgs Cross Section Working Group, 29The LHC Higgs Cross Section Working Group, 30The LHC Higgs Cross 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This Report summarizes the results of the activities of the LHC Higgs Cross Section Working Group in the period 2014-2016. The main goal of the working group was to present the state-of-the-art of Higgs physics at the LHC, integrating all new results that have appeared in the last few years. The first part compiles the most up-to-date predictions of Higgs boson production cross sections and decay branching ratios, parton distribution functions, and off-shell Higgs boson production and interference effects. Read More

We present a sparse estimation and dictionary learning framework for compressed fiber sensing based on a probabilistic hierarchical sparse model. To handle severe dictionary coherence, selective shrinkage is achieved using a Weibull prior, which can be related to non-convex optimization with $p$-norm constraints for $0 < p < 1$. In addition, we leverage the specific dictionary structure to promote collective shrinkage based on a local similarity model. Read More

We propose a compressed sampling and dictionary learning framework for fiber-optic sensing using wavelength-tunable lasers. A redundant dictionary is generated from a model for the reflected sensor signal. Imperfect prior knowledge is considered in terms of uncertain local and global parameters. Read More

We present predictions for $t \bar t$ and $t \bar t H$ production and decay at future lepton colliders including non-resonant and interference contributions up to next-to-leading order (NLO) in perturbative QCD. The obtained precision predictions are necessary for a future precise determination of the top-quark Yukawa coupling, and allow for top-quark phenomenology in the continuum at an unprecedented level of accuracy. Simulations are performed with the automated NLO Monte-Carlo framework WHIZARD interfaced to the OpenLoops matrix element generator. Read More

We discuss the process of deep-inelastic electron scattering (DIS) on the polarized deuteron with detection of a nucleon in the nuclear fragmentation region ("spectator tagging"). We cover (a) the general structure of the semi-inclusive DIS cross section on a spin-1 target; (b) the tagged structure functions in the impulse approximation, where deuteron structure is described by the $NN$ light-front wave function; (c) the extraction of free neutron structure through on-shell extrapolation in the recoil proton momentum. As an application we consider the extraction of the neutron spin structure function $g_{1n}$ through polarized electron scattering on the longitudinally polarized deuteron with proton tagging and on-shell extrapolation. Read More

We explore the feasibility of direct measurements of nuclear gluon densities using heavy-quark production (open charm, beauty) at a future Electron-Ion Collider (EIC). We focus on the regions x > 0.3 (EMC effect) and x ~ 0. Read More

We study the spin-flavor structure of the nucleon's chiral-odd generalized parton distributions (transversity GPDs) in the large-N_c limit of QCD. In contrast to the chiral-even case, only three combinations of the four chiral-odd GPDs are non-zero in the leading order of the 1/N_c expansion: E_T-bar = E_T + 2 H_T-tilde, H_T and E_T-tilde. The degeneracy is explained by the absence of spin-orbit interactions correlating the transverse momentum transfer with the transverse quark spin. Read More

The integral measurement of the $^{12}$C(n,p)$^{12}$B reaction was performed at the neutron time of flight facility n_TOF at CERN. The total number of $^{12}$B nuclei produced per neutron pulse of the n_TOF beam was determined using the activation technique in combination with a time of flight technique. The cross section is integrated over the n_TOF neutron energy spectrum from reaction threshold at 13. Read More

2016Apr
Authors: L. Cosentino, A. Musumarra, M. Barbagallo, A. Pappalardo, N. Colonna, L. Damone, M. Piscopo, P. Finocchiaro, E. Maugeri, S. Heinitz, D. Schumann, R. Dressler, N. Kivel, O. Aberle, J. Andrzejewski, L. Audouin, M. Ayranov, M. Bacak, S. Barros, J. Balibrea-Correa, V. Beecares, F. Becvar, C. Beinrucker, E. Berthoumieux, J. Billowes, D. Bosnar, M. Brugger, M. Caamano, M. Calviani, F. Calvino, D. Cano-Ott, R. Cardella, A. Casanovas, D. M. Castelluccio, F. Cerutti, Y. H. Chen, E. Chiaveri, G. Cortes, M. A. Cortes-Giraldo, M. Diakaki, C. Domingo-Pardo, E. Dupont, I. Duran, B. Fernandez-Dominguez, A. Ferrari, P. Ferreira, W. Furman, S. Ganesan, A. Garcia-Rios, A. Gawlik, I. Gheorghe, T. Glodariu, K. Goebel, I. F. Goncalves, E. Gonzalez-Romero, E. Griesmayer, C. Guerrero, F. Gunsing, H. Harada, T. Heftrich, J. Heyse, D. G. Jenkins, E. Jericha, F. Kaeppeler, T. Katabuchi, P. Kavrigin, A. Kimura, M. Kokkoris, M. Krticka, E. Leal-Chidonca, J. Lerendegui, C. Lederer, H. Leeb, S. Lo Meo, S. Lonsdale, R. Losito, D. Macina, J. Marganiec, T. Martinez, C. Massimi, P. Mastinu, M. Mastromarco, F. Matteucci, A. Mazzone, E. Mendoza, A. Mengoni, P. M. Milazzo, F. Mingrone, M. Mirea, S. Montesano, R. Nolte, A. Oprea, N. Patronis, A. Pavlik, J. Perkowski, J. Praena, J. Quesada, K. Rajeev, T. Rauscher, R. Reifarth, A. Riego-Perez, P. Rout, C. Rubbia, J. Ryan, M. Sabate-Gilarte, A. Saxena, P. Schillebeeckx, S. Schmidt, P. Sedyshev, A. Stamatopoulos, G. Tagliente, J. L. Tain, A. Tarifeno-Saldivia, L. Tassan-Got, A. Tsinganis, S. Valenta, G. Vannini, V. Variale, P. Vaz, A. Ventura, V. Vlachoudis, R. Vlastou, J. Vollaire, A. Wallner, S. Warren, M. Weigand, C. Weiß, C. Wolf, P. J. Woods, T. Wright, P. Zugec, n_TOF collaboration

The newly built second experimental area EAR2 of the n_TOF spallation neutron source at CERN allows to perform (n, charged particles) experiments on short-lived highly radioactive targets. This paper describes a detection apparatus and the experimental procedure for the determination of the cross-section of the 7Be(n,{\alpha}) reaction, which represents one of the focal points toward the solution of the cosmological Lithium abundance problem, and whose only measurement, at thermal energy, dates back to 1963. The apparently unsurmountable experimental difficulties stemming from the huge 7Be {\gamma}-activity, along with the lack of a suitable neutron beam facility, had so far prevented further measurements. Read More

Transverse densities describe the spatial distribution of electromagnetic current in the nucleon at fixed light-front time. At peripheral distances b = O(M_pi^{-1}) the densities are governed by chiral dynamics and can be calculated model-independently using chiral effective field theory (EFT). Recent work has shown that the EFT results can be represented in first-quantized form, as overlap integrals of chiral light-front wave functions describing the transition of the nucleon to soft-pion-nucleon intermediate states, resulting in a quantum-mechanical picture of the peripheral transverse densities. Read More

2016Mar
Authors: M. Arenz, M. Babutzka, M. Bahr, J. P. Barrett, S. Bauer, M. Beck, A. Beglarian, J. Behrens, T. Bergmann, U. Besserer, J. Blümer, L. I. Bodine, K. Bokeloh, J. Bonn, B. Bornschein, L. Bornschein, S. Büsch, T. H. Burritt, S. Chilingaryan, T. J. Corona, L. De Viveiros, P. J. Doe, O. Dragoun, G. Drexlin, S. Dyba, S. Ebenhöch, K. Eitel, E. Ellinger, S. Enomoto, M. Erhard, D. Eversheim, M. Fedkevych, A. Felden, S. Fischer, J. A. Formaggio, F. Fränkle, D. Furse, M. Ghilea, W. Gil, F. Glück, A. Gonzalez Urena, S. Görhardt, S. Groh, S. Grohmann, R. Grössle, R. Gumbsheimer, M. Hackenjos, V. Hannen, F. Harms, N. Hauÿmann, F. Heizmann, K. Helbing, W. Herz, S. Hickford, D. Hilk, B. Hillen, T. Höhn, B. Holzapfel, M. Hötzel, M. A. Howe, A. Huber, A. Jansen, N. Kernert, L. Kippenbrock, M. Kleesiek, M. Klein, A. Kopmann, A. Kosmider, A. Kovalík, B. Krasch, M. Kraus, H. Krause, M. Krause, L. Kuckert, B. Kuffner, L. La Cascio, O. Lebeda, B. Leiber, J. Letnev, V. M. Lobashev, A. Lokhov, E. Malcherek, M. Mark, E. L. Martin, S. Mertens, S. Mirz, B. Monreal, K. Müller, M. Neuberger, H. Neumann, S. Niemes, M. Noe, N. S. Oblath, A. Off, H. -W. Ortjohann, A. Osipowicz, E. Otten, D. S. Parno, P. Plischke, A. W. P. Poon, M. Prall, F. Priester, P. C. -O. Ranitzsch, J. Reich, O. Rest, R. G. H. Robertson, M. Röllig, S. Rosendahl, S. Rupp, M. Rysavy, K. Schlösser, M. Schlösser, K. Schönung, M. Schrank, J. Schwarz, W. Seiler, H. Seitz-Moskaliuk, J. Sentkerestiova, A. Skasyrskaya, M. Slezak, A. Spalek, M. Steidl, N. Steinbrink, M. Sturm, M. Suesser, H. H. Telle, T. Thümmler, N. Titov, I. Tkachev, N. Trost, A. Unru, K. Valerius, D. Venos, R. Vianden, S. Vöcking, B. L. Wall, N. Wandkowsky, M. Weber, C. Weinheimer, C. Weiss, S. Welte, J. Wendel, K. L. Wierman, J. F. Wilkerson, D. Winzen, J. Wolf, S. Wüstling, M. Zacher, S. Zadoroghny, M. Zboril

The KATRIN experiment will probe the neutrino mass by measuring the beta-electron energy spectrum near the endpoint of tritium beta-decay. An integral energy analysis will be performed by an electro-static spectrometer (Main Spectrometer), an ultra-high vacuum vessel with a length of 23.2 m, a volume of 1240 m^3, and a complex inner electrode system with about 120000 individual parts. Read More

In this talk we summarize the top physics setup in the event generator WHIZARD with a main focus on lepton colliders. This includes full six-, eight- and ten-fermion processes, factorized processes and spin correlations. For lepton colliders, QCD NLO processes for top quark physics are available and will be discussed. Read More

We give a status report on the automation of next-to-leading order processes within the Monte Carlo event generator WHIZARD, using GoSam and OpenLoops as provider for one-loop matrix elements. To deal with divergences, WHIZARD uses automated FKS subtraction, and the phase space for singular regions is generated automatically. NLO examples for both scattering and decay processes with a focus on e+e- processes are shown. Read More

An Electron-Ion Collider (EIC) would enable next-generation measurements of deep-inelastic scattering (DIS) on the deuteron with detection of a forward-moving nucleon (p, n) and measurement of its recoil momentum ("spectator tagging"). Such experiments offer full control of the nuclear configuration during the high-energy process and can be used for precision studies of the neutron's partonic structure and its spin dependence, nuclear modifications of partonic structure, and nuclear shadowing at small x. We review the theoretical description of spectator tagging at EIC energies (light-front nuclear structure, on-shell extrapolation in the recoil nucleon momentum, final-state interactions, diffractive effects at small x) and report about on-going developments. Read More

A pulse shape analysis framework is described, which was developed for n_TOF-Phase3, the third phase in the operation of the n_TOF facility at CERN. The most notable feature of this new framework is the adoption of generic pulse shape analysis routines, characterized by a minimal number of explicit assumptions about the nature of pulses. The aim of these routines is to be applicable to a wide variety of detectors, thus facilitating the introduction of the new detectors or types of detectors into the analysis framework. Read More

We study the flavor structure of the nucleon's chiral-odd generalized parton distributions (transversity GPDs) in the large-N_c limit of QCD. It is found that in the distributions H_T and E_T-tilde the flavor-nonsinglet component u - d is leading in the 1/N_c expansion, while in E_T and H_T-tilde it is the flavor-singlet component u + d. This pattern is consistent with the flavor structure extracted from hard exclusive pi^0 and eta electroproduction data, assuming that the processes are dominated by the twist-3 mechanism involving the chiral-odd pseudoscalar meson distribution amplitudes. Read More

We present the status of the automation of NLO processes within the event generator WHIZARD. The program provides an automated FKS subtraction and phase space integration over the FKS regions, while the (QCD) NLO matrix element is accessed via the Binoth Les Houches Interface from an externally linked one-loop program. Massless and massive test cases and validation are shown for several e+e- processes. Read More

Grand-canonical fluctuations of Bose-Einstein condensates of light are accessible to state-of-the-art experiments [J. Schmitt et al., Phys. Read More

Multi-mode expansions in computational quantum dynamics promise convergence toward exact results upon increasing the number of modes. Convergence is difficult to ascertain in practice due to the unfavourable scaling of required resources for many-particle problems and therefore a simplified criterion based on a threshold value for the least occupied mode function is often used. Here we show how the separable quantum motion of the center of mass can be used to sensitively detect unconverged numerical multi-particle dynamics in harmonic potentials. Read More

We show that the spreading of the center-of-mass density of ultracold attractively interacting bosons can become superballistic in the presence of decoherence, via single-, two- and/or three-body losses. In the limit of weak decoherence, we analytically solve the numerical model introduced in [Phys. Rev. Read More

We briefly discuss the current status of NLO QCD automation in the Monte Carlo event generator WHIZARD. The functionality is presented for the explicit study of off-shell top quark production with associated backgrounds at a lepton collider. Read More

Building on the new automatic subtraction of NLO amplitudes in WHIZARD, we present our implementation of the POWHEG scheme to match radiative corrections consistently with the parton shower. We apply this general framework to two linear collider processes, $e^+e^-\,\to\,t\bar{t}$ and $e^+e^-\,\to\,t\bar{t}H$. Read More

We model the dynamics of attractively interacting ultracold bosonic atoms in a quasi-one-dimensional wave-guide with additional harmonic trapping. Initially, we prepare the system in its ground state and then shift the zero of the harmonic trap and switch on an additional narrow scattering potential near the center of the trap. After colliding with the barrier twice, we propose to measure the number of atoms opposite to the initial condition. Read More

We report the observation of quantum reflection from a narrow, attractive, potential using bright solitary matter-waves formed from a 85Rb Bose-Einstein condensate. We create narrow potentials using a tightly focused, red-detuned laser beam, and observe reflection of up to 25% of the atoms, along with the trapping of atoms at the position of the beam. We show that the observed reflected fraction is much larger than theoretical predictions for a narrow Gaussian potential well; a more detailed model of bright soliton propagation, accounting for the generic presence of small subsidiary intensity maxima in the red-detuned beam, suggests that these small intensity maxima are the cause of this enhanced reflection. Read More

The nucleon's electromagnetic form factors are expressed in terms of the transverse densities of charge and magnetization at fixed light-front time. At peripheral transverse distances $b = O(M_\pi^{-1})$ the densities are governed by chiral dynamics and can be calculated model-independently using chiral effective field theory (EFT). We represent the leading-order chiral EFT results for the peripheral transverse densities as overlap integrals of chiral light-front wave functions, describing the transition of the initial nucleon to soft pion-nucleon intermediate states and back. Read More

The nucleon's peripheral transverse charge and magnetization densities are computed in chiral effective field theory. The densities are represented in first-quantized form, as overlap integrals of chiral light-front wave functions describing the transition of the nucleon to soft pion-nucleon intermediate states. The orbital motion of the pion causes a large left-right asymmetry in a transversely polarized nucleon. Read More

2014Oct

The $^{238}$U to $^{235}$U fission cross section ratio has been determined at n_TOF up to $\sim$1 GeV, with two different detection systems, in different geometrical configurations. A total of four datasets have been collected and compared. They are all consistent to each other within the relative systematic uncertainty of 3-4%. Read More

We describe the multi-purpose Monte-Carlo event generator WHIZARD for the simulation of high-energy particle physics experiments. Besides the presentation of the general features of the program like SM physics, BSM physics, and QCD effects, special emphasis will be given to the support of the most accurate simulation of the collider environments at hadron colliders and especially at future linear lepton colliders. On the more technical side, the very recent code refactoring towards a completely object-oriented software package to improve maintainability, flexibility and code development will be discussed. Read More

The neutron's deep-inelastic structure functions provide essential information for the flavor separation of the nucleon parton densities, the nucleon spin decomposition, and precision studies of QCD phenomena in the flavor-singlet and nonsinglet sectors. Traditional inclusive measurements on nuclear targets are limited by dilution from scattering on protons, Fermi motion and binding effects, final-state interactions, and nuclear shadowing at x << 0.1. Read More

2014Aug

The integral cross section of the $^{12}$C($n,p$)$^{12}$B reaction has been determined for the first time in the neutron energy range from threshold to several GeV at the n_TOF facility at CERN. The measurement relies on the activation technique, with the $\beta$-decay of $^{12}$B measured over a period of four half-lives within the same neutron bunch in which the reaction occurs. The results indicate that model predictions, used in a variety of applications, are mostly inadequate. Read More

Brownian motion is ballistic on short time scales and diffusive on long time scales. Our theoretical investigations indicate that one can observe the exact opposite - an "anomaleous diffusion process" where initially diffusive motion becomes ballistic on longer time scales - in an ultracold atom system with a size comparable to macromolecules. This system is a quantum matter-wave bright soliton subject to decoherence via three-particle losses for which we investigate the center-of-mass motion. Read More

An Electron-Ion Collider (EIC) with suitable forward detection capabilities would enable a unique experimental program of deep-inelastic scattering (DIS) from polarized light nuclei (deuterium 2H, helium 3He) with spectator nucleon tagging. Such measurements promise significant advances in several key areas of nuclear physics and QCD: (a) neutron spin structure, by using polarized deuterium and eliminating nuclear effects through on-shell extrapolation in the spectator proton momentum; (b) quark/gluon structure of the bound nucleon at x > 0.1 and the dynamical mechanisms acting on it, by measuring the spectator momentum dependence of nuclear structure functions; (c) coherent effects in QCD, by exploring shadowing in tagged DIS on deuterium at x << 0. Read More

2014Jun

The neutron sensitivity of the C$_6$D$_6$ detector setup used at n_TOF for capture measurements has been studied by means of detailed GEANT4 simulations. A realistic software replica of the entire n_TOF experimental hall, including the neutron beam line, sample, detector supports and the walls of the experimental area has been implemented in the simulations. The simulations have been analyzed in the same manner as experimental data, in particular by applying the Pulse Height Weighting Technique. Read More

The non-equilibrium-steady state (NEST) for photons in a cavity is investigated theoretically. The NEST is caused by different parts of the cavity being at distinct temperatures or by temperature gradients. By using a rate equation based on the Lindblad equation, we derive an analytic expression for the steady-state distribution of the photon spectrum. Read More

2014Mar

The cross section of the $^{62}$Ni($n,\gamma$) reaction was measured with the time-of-flight technique at the neutron time-of-flight facility n_TOF at CERN. Capture kernels of 42 resonances were analyzed up to 200~keV neutron energy and Maxwellian averaged cross sections (MACS) from $kT=5-100$ keV were calculated. With a total uncertainty of 4. Read More

The $^{58}$Ni $(n,\gamma)$ cross section has been measured at the neutron time of flight facility n_TOF at CERN, in the energy range from 27 meV up to 400 keV. In total, 51 resonances have been analyzed up to 122 keV. Maxwellian averaged cross sections (MACS) have been calculated for stellar temperatures of kT$=$5-100 keV with uncertainties of less than 6%, showing fair agreement with recent experimental and evaluated data up to kT = 50 keV. Read More

We study bright solitons in the Gross-Pitaevskii equation as they are split and recombined in a low energy system. We present new analytic results determining the general region in which a soliton may not be split on a potential barrier, and confirm these results numerically. Furthermore, we analyse the energetic regimes where quantum fluctuations in the initial center of mass position and momentum become influential on the outcome of soliton splitting and recombination events. Read More

The generation of mesoscopic Bell states via collisions of distinguishable bright solitons has been suggested in Phys. Rev. Lett. Read More

At the n\_TOF experiment at CERN a dedicated single-crystal chemical vapor deposition (sCVD) Diamond Mosaic-Detector has been developed for (n,$\alpha$) cross-section measurements. The detector, characterized by an excellent time and energy resolution, consists of an array of 9 sCVD diamond diodes. The detector has been characterized and a cross-section measurement has been performed for the $^{59}$Ni(n,$\alpha$)$^{56}$Fe reaction in 2012. Read More

We investigate finite number effects in collisions between two states of an initially well defined number of identical bosons with attractive contact interactions, oscillating in the presence of harmonic confinement in one dimension. We investigate two $N/2$ atom bound states, which are initially displaced (symmetrically) from the trap center, and then left to freely evolve. For sufficiently attractive interactions, these bound states are like those found through use of the Bethe Ansatz (quantum solitons). Read More

In the light-front description of nucleon structure the electromagnetic form factors are expressed in terms of frame-independent transverse densities of charge and magnetization. Recent work has studied the transverse densities at peripheral distances b = O(M_pi^{-1}), where they are governed by universal chiral dynamics and can be computed in a model-independent manner. Of particular interest is the comparison of the peripheral charge and magnetization densities. Read More

Recent theoretical studies have provided new insight into the intrinsic transverse momentum distributions of valence and sea quarks in the nucleon at a low scale. The valence quark transverse momentum distributions (q - qbar) are governed by the nucleon's inverse hadronic size R^{-1} ~ 0.2 GeV and drop steeply at large p_T. Read More