C. Vidal - Laboratory for Nuclear Science, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, MA, USA and the Bates Research and Engineering Center, Middleton MA

C. Vidal
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Name
C. Vidal
Affiliation
Laboratory for Nuclear Science, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, MA, USA and the Bates Research and Engineering Center, Middleton MA
City
Middleton
Country
United States

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Physics - General Physics (5)
 
Physics - Instrumentation and Detectors (5)
 
Nuclear Experiment (4)
 
Instrumentation and Methods for Astrophysics (3)
 
Mathematics - Dynamical Systems (2)
 
High Energy Physics - Experiment (2)
 
Computer Science - Logic in Computer Science (2)
 
Computer Science - Artificial Intelligence (2)
 
Physics - Accelerator Physics (1)
 
Nuclear Theory (1)
 
Cosmology and Nongalactic Astrophysics (1)
 
Computer Science - Other (1)
 
Physics - Popular Physics (1)
 
Astrophysics of Galaxies (1)
 
High Energy Physics - Phenomenology (1)

Publications Authored By C. Vidal

Pulsars have at least two impressive applications. First, they can be used as highly accurate clocks, comparable in stability to atomic clocks; second, a small subset of pulsars, millisecond X-ray pulsars, provide all the necessary ingredients for a passive galactic positioning system. This is known in astronautics as X-ray pulsar-based navigation (XNAV). Read More

We have performed a novel comparison between electron-beam polarimeters based on M{\o}ller and Compton scattering. A sequence of electron-beam polarization measurements were performed at low beam currents ($<$ 5 $\mu$A) during the $Q_{\rm weak}$ experiment in Hall C at Jefferson Lab. These low current measurements were bracketed by the regular high current (180 $\mu$A) operation of the Compton polarimeter. Read More

In this note we consider the problem of introducing variables in temporal logic programs under the formalism of "Temporal Equilibrium Logic" (TEL), an extension of Answer Set Programming (ASP) for dealing with linear-time modal operators. To this aim, we provide a definition of a first-order version of TEL that shares the syntax of first-order Linear-time Temporal Logic (LTL) but has a different semantics, selecting some LTL models we call "temporal stable models". Then, we consider a subclass of theories (called "splittable temporal logic programs") that are close to usual logic programs but allowing a restricted use of temporal operators. Read More

The concept of "logical depth" introduced by Charles H. Bennett (1988) seems to capture, at least partially, the notion of organized complexity, so central in big history. More precisely, the increase in organized complexity refers here to the wealth, variety and intricacy of structures, and should not be confused with the increase of random complexity, formalized by Kolmogorov (1965). Read More

2016Aug
Authors: Naoyuki Tamura, Naruhisa Takato, Atsushi Shimono, Yuki Moritani, Kiyoto Yabe, Yuki Ishizuka, Akitoshi Ueda, Yukiko Kamata, Hrand Aghazarian, Stephane Arnouts, Gabriel Barban, Robert H. Barkhouser, Renato C. Borges, David F. Braun, Michael A. Carr, Pierre-Yves Chabaud, Yin-Chang Chang, Hsin-Yo Chen, Masashi Chiba, Richard C. Y. Chou, You-Hua Chu, Judith G. Cohen, Rodrigo P. de Almeida, Antonio C. de Oliveira, Ligia S. de Oliveira, Richard G. Dekany, Kjetil Dohlen, Jesulino B. dos Santos, Leandro H. dos Santos, Richard S. Ellis, Maximilian Fabricius, Didier Ferrand, Decio Ferreira, Mirek Golebiowski, Jenny E. Greene, Johannes Gross, James E. Gunn, Randolph Hammond, Albert Harding, Murdock Hart, Timothy M. Heckman, Christopher M. Hirata, Paul Ho, Stephen C. Hope, Larry Hovland, Shu-Fu Hsu, Yen-Shan Hu, Ping-Jie Huang, Marc Jaquet, Yipeng Jing, Jennifer Karr, Masahiko Kimura, Matthew E. King, Eiichiro Komatsu, Vincent Le Brun, Olivier Le Fevre, Arnaud Le Fur, David Le Mignant, Hung-Hsu Ling, Craig P. Loomis, Robert H. Lupton, Fabrice Madec, Peter Mao, Lucas S. Marrara, Claudia Mendes de Oliveira, Yosuke Minowa, Chaz N. Morantz, Hitoshi Murayama, Graham J. Murray, Youichi Ohyama, Joseph Orndorff, Sandrine Pascal, Jefferson M. Pereira, Daniel J. Reiley, Martin Reinecke, Andreas Ritter, Mitsuko Roberts, Mark A. Schwochert, Michael D. Seiffert, Stephen A. Smee, Laerte Sodre Jr., David N. Spergel, Aaron J. Steinkraus, Michael A. Strauss, Christian Surace, Yasushi Suto, Nao Suzuki, John Swinbank, Philip J. Tait, Masahiro Takada, Tomonori Tamura, Yoko Tanaka, Laurence Tresse, Orlando Verducci Jr., Didier Vibert, Clement Vidal, Shiang-Yu Wang, Chih-Yi Wen, Chi-Hung Yan, Naoki Yasuda

PFS (Prime Focus Spectrograph), a next generation facility instrument on the 8.2-meter Subaru Telescope, is a very wide-field, massively multiplexed, optical and near-infrared spectrograph. Exploiting the Subaru prime focus, 2394 reconfigurable fibers will be distributed over the 1. Read More

We report on the highest precision yet achieved in the measurement of the polarization of a low energy, $\mathcal{O}$(1 GeV), electron beam, accomplished using a new polarimeter based on electron-photon scattering, in Hall~C at Jefferson Lab. A number of technical innovations were necessary, including a novel method for precise control of the laser polarization in a cavity and a novel diamond micro-strip detector which was able to capture most of the spectrum of scattered electrons. The data analysis technique exploited track finding, the high granularity of the detector and its large acceptance. Read More

In this paper we provide an alternative semantics for Equilibrium Logic and its monotonic basis, the logic of Here-and-There (also known as G\"odel's G3 logic) that relies on the idea of "denotation" of a formula, that is, a function that collects the set of models of that formula. Using the three-valued logic G3 as a starting point and an ordering relation (for which equilibrium/stable models are minimal elements) we provide several elementary operations for sets of interpretations. By analysing structural properties of the denotation of formulas, we show some expressiveness results for G3 such as, for instance, that conjunction is not expressible in terms of the other connectives. Read More

2015Jul

The Prime Focus Spectrograph (PFS) is an optical/near-infrared multifiber spectrograph with 2394 science fibers distributed across a 1.3-deg diameter field of view at the Subaru 8.2-m telescope. Read More

We introduce a circular restricted charged three-body problem on the plane. In this model, the gravitational and Coulomb forces, due to the primary bodies, act on a test particle; the net force exerted by some primary body on the test particle can be attractive, repulsive or null. The restricted problem is obtained by the general planar charged three-body problem considering one mass of the three bodies going to zero. Read More

We describe the current status of the DarkLight experiment at Jefferson Laboratory. DarkLight is motivated by the possibility that a dark photon in the mass range 10 to 100 MeV/c$^2$ could couple the dark sector to the Standard Model. DarkLight will precisely measure electron proton scattering using the 100 MeV electron beam of intensity 5 mA at the Jefferson Laboratory energy recovering linac incident on a windowless gas target of molecular hydrogen. Read More

2014Aug

The Prime Focus Spectrograph (PFS) is an optical/near-infrared multi-fiber spectrograph with 2394 science fibers, which are distributed in 1.3 degree diameter field of view at Subaru 8.2-meter telescope. Read More

We characterize the values of the parameters for which a zero--Hopf equilibrium point takes place at the singular points, namely, $O$ (the origin), $P_+$ and $P_-$ in the FitzHugh-Nagumo system. Thus we find two $2$--parameter families of the FitzHugh-Nagumo system for which the equilibrium point at the origin is a zero-Hopf equilibrium. For these two families we prove the existence of a periodic orbit bifurcating from the zero--Hopf equilibrium point $O$. Read More

The OLYMPUS experiment was designed to measure the ratio between the positron-proton and electron-proton elastic scattering cross sections, with the goal of determining the contribution of two-photon exchange to the elastic cross section. Two-photon exchange might resolve the discrepancy between measurements of the proton form factor ratio, $\mu_p G^p_E/G^p_M$, made using polarization techniques and those made in unpolarized experiments. OLYMPUS operated on the DORIS storage ring at DESY, alternating between 2. Read More

2013Jul
Affiliations: 1Laboratory for Nuclear Science, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, MA, USA and the Bates Research and Engineering Center, Middleton MA, 2Laboratory for Nuclear Science, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, MA, USA and the Bates Research and Engineering Center, Middleton MA, 3Laboratory for Nuclear Science, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, MA, USA and the Bates Research and Engineering Center, Middleton MA, 4Laboratory for Nuclear Science, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, MA, USA and the Bates Research and Engineering Center, Middleton MA, 5Laboratory for Nuclear Science, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, MA, USA and the Bates Research and Engineering Center, Middleton MA, 6Laboratory for Nuclear Science, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, MA, USA and the Bates Research and Engineering Center, Middleton MA, 7Laboratory for Nuclear Science, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, MA, USA and the Bates Research and Engineering Center, Middleton MA, 8Laboratory for Nuclear Science, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, MA, USA and the Bates Research and Engineering Center, Middleton MA, 9Laboratory for Nuclear Science, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, MA, USA and the Bates Research and Engineering Center, Middleton MA, 10Laboratory for Nuclear Science, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, MA, USA and the Bates Research and Engineering Center, Middleton MA, 11Laboratory for Nuclear Science, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, MA, USA and the Bates Research and Engineering Center, Middleton MA, 12Laboratory for Nuclear Science, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, MA, USA and the Bates Research and Engineering Center, Middleton MA, 13Laboratory for Nuclear Science, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, MA, USA and the Bates Research and Engineering Center, Middleton MA, 14Laboratory for Nuclear Science, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, MA, USA and the Bates Research and Engineering Center, Middleton MA, 15Laboratory for Nuclear Science, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, MA, USA and the Bates Research and Engineering Center, Middleton MA, 16Laboratory for Nuclear Science, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, MA, USA and the Bates Research and Engineering Center, Middleton MA, 17Laboratory for Nuclear Science, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, MA, USA and the Bates Research and Engineering Center, Middleton MA, 18Laboratory for Nuclear Science, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, MA, USA and the Bates Research and Engineering Center, Middleton MA, 19Laboratory for Nuclear Science, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, MA, USA and the Bates Research and Engineering Center, Middleton MA, 20Laboratory for Nuclear Science, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, MA, USA and the Bates Research and Engineering Center, Middleton MA, 21Laboratory for Nuclear Science, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, MA, USA and the Bates Research and Engineering Center, Middleton MA, 22Laboratory for Nuclear Science, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, MA, USA and the Bates Research and Engineering Center, Middleton MA, 23Laboratory for Nuclear Science, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, MA, USA and the Bates Research and Engineering Center, Middleton MA, 24Jefferson Lab, Newport News, VA USA, 25Jefferson Lab, Newport News, VA USA, 26Jefferson Lab, Newport News, VA USA, 27Jefferson Lab, Newport News, VA USA, 28Jefferson Lab, Newport News, VA USA, 29Jefferson Lab, Newport News, VA USA, 30Jefferson Lab, Newport News, VA USA, 31Jefferson Lab, Newport News, VA USA, 32Jefferson Lab, Newport News, VA USA, 33Jefferson Lab, Newport News, VA USA, 34Jefferson Lab, Newport News, VA USA, 35Jefferson Lab, Newport News, VA USA, 36Jefferson Lab, Newport News, VA USA, 37Jefferson Lab, Newport News, VA USA, 38Jefferson Lab, Newport News, VA USA, 39Jefferson Lab, Newport News, VA USA, 40Jefferson Lab, Newport News, VA USA, 41Jefferson Lab, Newport News, VA USA, 42Jefferson Lab, Newport News, VA USA, 43Jefferson Lab, Newport News, VA USA, 44Jefferson Lab, Newport News, VA USA, 45Jefferson Lab, Newport News, VA USA, 46Physics Dept. U.C. Berkeley, Berkeley, CA USA, 47Institute for Research in Electronics and Applied Physics, University of Maryland, College Park, MD USA, 48Institute for Research in Electronics and Applied Physics, University of Maryland, College Park, MD USA, 49Physics Department, Arizona State University, Tempe, 50Physics Department, Arizona State University, Tempe, 51Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos NM USA, 52Physics Dept., Hampton University, Hampton, VA and Jefferson Lab, Newport News, VA USA, 53Physics Dept., Hampton University, Hampton, VA and Jefferson Lab, Newport News, VA USA, 54Physics Dept., Hampton University, Hampton, VA and Jefferson Lab, Newport News, VA USA, 55Physics Dept., Catholic University of America, Washington, DC USA, 56Physics Dept., Catholic University of America, Washington, DC USA, 57Physics Dept., Catholic University of America, Washington, DC USA, 58Temple University, Philadelphia PA USA, 59Temple University, Philadelphia PA USA, 60Temple University, Philadelphia PA USA, 61Temple University, Philadelphia PA USA, 62Temple University, Philadelphia PA USA, 63University Bonn, Bonn Germany, 64University Bonn, Bonn Germany, 65University Bonn, Bonn Germany, 66Physikalisches Institut Justus-Liebig-Universitt Giessen, Giessen Germany, 67Physikalisches Institut Justus-Liebig-Universitt Giessen, Giessen Germany

We give a short overview of the DarkLight detector concept which is designed to search for a heavy photon A' with a mass in the range 10 MeV/c^2 < m(A') < 90 MeV/c^2 and which decays to lepton pairs. We describe the intended operating environment, the Jefferson Laboratory free electon laser, and a way to extend DarkLight's reach using A' --> invisible decays. Read More

Where does it all come from? Where are we going? Are we alone in the universe? What is good and what is evil? The scientific narrative of cosmic evolution demands that we tackle such big questions with a cosmological perspective. I tackle the first question in Chapters 4-6; the second in Chapters 7-8; the third in Chapter 9 and the fourth in Chapter 10. However, where do we start to answer such questions? In Chapters 1-3, I elaborate the concept of worldview and argue that we should aim at constructing comprehensive and coherent worldviews. Read More

This paper introduces foundations for a new kind of cosmology. We advocate that computer simulations are needed to address two key cosmological issues. First, the robustness of the emergence of complexity, which boils down to ask: "what would remain the same if the tape of the universe were replayed?" Second, the much debated fine-tuning issue, which requires to answer the question: "are complex universes rare or common in the space of possible universes?" We argue that computer simulations are indispensable tools to address those two issues scientifically. Read More

The Search for Extra-Terrestrial Intelligence (SETI) has so far been unsuccessful and needs additional methods. We introduce a two-dimensional metric for civilization development, using the Kardashev scale of energy increase and the Barrow scale of inward manipulation. To support Barrow's scale limit, we contend with energetic, societal, scientific, computational, and philosophical arguments that black holes are attractors for intelligence. Read More

In this philosophical paper, we explore computational and biological analogies to address the fine-tuning problem in cosmology. We first clarify what it means for physical constants or initial conditions to be fine-tuned. We review important distinctions such as the dimensionless and dimensional physical constants, and the classification of constants proposed by Levy-Leblond. Read More

This document is the Special Issue of the First International Conference on the Evolution and Development of the Universe (EDU 2008). Please refer to the preface and introduction for more details on the contributions. Keywords: acceleration, artificial cosmogenesis, artificial life, Big Bang, Big History, biological evolution, biological universe, biology, causality, classical vacuum energy, complex systems, complexity, computational universe, conscious evolution, cosmological artificial selection, cosmological natural selection, cosmology, critique, cultural evolution, dark energy, dark matter, development of the universe, development, emergence, evolution of the universe evolution, exobiology, extinction, fine-tuning, fractal space-time, fractal, information, initial conditions, intentional evolution, linear expansion of the universe, log-periodic laws, macroevolution, materialism, meduso-anthropic principle, multiple worlds, natural sciences, Nature, ontology, order, origin of the universe, particle hierarchy, philosophy, physical constants, quantum darwinism, reduction, role of intelligent life, scale relativity, scientific evolution, self-organization, speciation, specification hierarchy, thermodynamics, time, universe, vagueness. Read More

This philosophical paper explores the relation between modern scientific simulations and the future of the universe. We argue that a simulation of an entire universe will result from future scientific activity. This requires us to tackle the challenge of simulating open-ended evolution at all levels in a single simulation. Read More