C. Tennant - Jefferson Lab, Newport News, VA USA

C. Tennant
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Name
C. Tennant
Affiliation
Jefferson Lab, Newport News, VA USA
City
Newport News
Country
United States

Pubs By Year

Pub Categories

 
Physics - Accelerator Physics (11)
 
High Energy Physics - Experiment (5)
 
Physics - Instrumentation and Detectors (2)
 
Nuclear Experiment (2)

Publications Authored By C. Tennant

The Polarized Electrons for Polarized Positrons experiment at the injector of the Continuous Electron Beam Accelerator Facility has demonstrated for the first time the efficient transfer of polarization from electrons to positrons produced by the polarized bremsstrahlung radiation induced by a polarized electron beam in a high-$Z$ target. Positron polarization up to 82\% have been measured for an initial electron beam momentum of 8.19~MeV/$c$, limited only by the electron beam polarization. Read More

As is known, microbunching instability (MBI) has been one of the most challenging issues in designs of magnetic chicanes for short-wavelength free-electron lasers or linear colliders, as well as those of transport lines for recirculating or energy recovery linac machines. To more accurately quantify MBI in a single-pass system and for more complete analyses, we further extend and continue to increase the capabilities of our previously developed linear Vlasov solver [1] to incorporate more relevant impedance models into the code, including transient and steady-state free-space and/or shielding coherent synchrotron radiation (CSR) impedances, the longitudinal space charge (LSC) impedances, and the linac geometric impedances with extension of the existing formulation to include beam acceleration [2]. Then, we directly solve the linearized Vlasov equation numerically for microbunching gain amplification factor. Read More

Coherent synchrotron radiation (CSR) induced microbunching instability has been one of the most challenging issues in the design of modern accelerators. A linear Vlasov solver has been developed [1] and applied to investigate the physical processes of microbunching gain amplification for several example lattices [2]. In this paper, by further extending the concept of stage gain as proposed by Huang and Kim [3], we develop a method to characterize the microbunching development in terms of stage orders that allow the quantitative comparison of optics impacts on microbunching gain for different lattices. Read More

The coherent synchrotron radiation (CSR) of a high brightness electron beam traversing a series of dipoles, such as transport or recirculation arcs, may result in the microbunching instability ({\mu}BI). To accurately quantify the direct consequence of this effect, we further extend our previously developed semi-analytical Vlasov solver [C. -Y. Read More

This document summarizes the design of Jefferson Lab's electron-ion collider, MEIC, as of January 20, 2015, and describes the facility whose cost was estimated for the United States Department of Energy Nuclear Sciences Advisory Committee EIC cost review of January 26-28, 2015. In particular, each of the main technical systems within the collider is presented to the level of the best current information. Read More

We describe the current status of the DarkLight experiment at Jefferson Laboratory. DarkLight is motivated by the possibility that a dark photon in the mass range 10 to 100 MeV/c$^2$ could couple the dark sector to the Standard Model. DarkLight will precisely measure electron proton scattering using the 100 MeV electron beam of intensity 5 mA at the Jefferson Laboratory energy recovering linac incident on a windowless gas target of molecular hydrogen. Read More

The coherent synchrotron radiation (CSR) of a high brightness electron beam traversing a series of dipoles, such as recirculation or transport arcs, may lead to the microbunching instability. We extend and develop a semi-analytical approach of the CSR-induced microbunching instability for a general lattice, based on the previous formulation with 1-D CSR model [Phys. Rev. Read More

Beam quality preservation during transport of high-brightness electron beams is of general concern in the design of modern accelerators. Methods to manage incoherent synchrotron radiation (ISR) have been in place for decades; as beam brightness has improved coherent synchrotron radiation (CSR) and the microbunching instability (uBI) have emerged as performance limitations. We apply the compensation analysis of diMitri, Cornacchia, and Spampinati - as previously used by Borland - to the design of transport systems for use with low-emittance beams, and find that appropriately configured second order achromats will suppress transverse emittance growth due to CSR and appear to limit uBI gain. Read More

2013Jul
Affiliations: 1Laboratory for Nuclear Science, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, MA, USA and the Bates Research and Engineering Center, Middleton MA, 2Laboratory for Nuclear Science, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, MA, USA and the Bates Research and Engineering Center, Middleton MA, 3Laboratory for Nuclear Science, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, MA, USA and the Bates Research and Engineering Center, Middleton MA, 4Laboratory for Nuclear Science, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, MA, USA and the Bates Research and Engineering Center, Middleton MA, 5Laboratory for Nuclear Science, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, MA, USA and the Bates Research and Engineering Center, Middleton MA, 6Laboratory for Nuclear Science, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, MA, USA and the Bates Research and Engineering Center, Middleton MA, 7Laboratory for Nuclear Science, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, MA, USA and the Bates Research and Engineering Center, Middleton MA, 8Laboratory for Nuclear Science, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, MA, USA and the Bates Research and Engineering Center, Middleton MA, 9Laboratory for Nuclear Science, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, MA, USA and the Bates Research and Engineering Center, Middleton MA, 10Laboratory for Nuclear Science, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, MA, USA and the Bates Research and Engineering Center, Middleton MA, 11Laboratory for Nuclear Science, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, MA, USA and the Bates Research and Engineering Center, Middleton MA, 12Laboratory for Nuclear Science, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, MA, USA and the Bates Research and Engineering Center, Middleton MA, 13Laboratory for Nuclear Science, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, MA, USA and the Bates Research and Engineering Center, Middleton MA, 14Laboratory for Nuclear Science, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, MA, USA and the Bates Research and Engineering Center, Middleton MA, 15Laboratory for Nuclear Science, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, MA, USA and the Bates Research and Engineering Center, Middleton MA, 16Laboratory for Nuclear Science, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, MA, USA and the Bates Research and Engineering Center, Middleton MA, 17Laboratory for Nuclear Science, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, MA, USA and the Bates Research and Engineering Center, Middleton MA, 18Laboratory for Nuclear Science, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, MA, USA and the Bates Research and Engineering Center, Middleton MA, 19Laboratory for Nuclear Science, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, MA, USA and the Bates Research and Engineering Center, Middleton MA, 20Laboratory for Nuclear Science, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, MA, USA and the Bates Research and Engineering Center, Middleton MA, 21Laboratory for Nuclear Science, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, MA, USA and the Bates Research and Engineering Center, Middleton MA, 22Laboratory for Nuclear Science, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, MA, USA and the Bates Research and Engineering Center, Middleton MA, 23Laboratory for Nuclear Science, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, MA, USA and the Bates Research and Engineering Center, Middleton MA, 24Jefferson Lab, Newport News, VA USA, 25Jefferson Lab, Newport News, VA USA, 26Jefferson Lab, Newport News, VA USA, 27Jefferson Lab, Newport News, VA USA, 28Jefferson Lab, Newport News, VA USA, 29Jefferson Lab, Newport News, VA USA, 30Jefferson Lab, Newport News, VA USA, 31Jefferson Lab, Newport News, VA USA, 32Jefferson Lab, Newport News, VA USA, 33Jefferson Lab, Newport News, VA USA, 34Jefferson Lab, Newport News, VA USA, 35Jefferson Lab, Newport News, VA USA, 36Jefferson Lab, Newport News, VA USA, 37Jefferson Lab, Newport News, VA USA, 38Jefferson Lab, Newport News, VA USA, 39Jefferson Lab, Newport News, VA USA, 40Jefferson Lab, Newport News, VA USA, 41Jefferson Lab, Newport News, VA USA, 42Jefferson Lab, Newport News, VA USA, 43Jefferson Lab, Newport News, VA USA, 44Jefferson Lab, Newport News, VA USA, 45Jefferson Lab, Newport News, VA USA, 46Physics Dept. U.C. Berkeley, Berkeley, CA USA, 47Institute for Research in Electronics and Applied Physics, University of Maryland, College Park, MD USA, 48Institute for Research in Electronics and Applied Physics, University of Maryland, College Park, MD USA, 49Physics Department, Arizona State University, Tempe, 50Physics Department, Arizona State University, Tempe, 51Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos NM USA, 52Physics Dept., Hampton University, Hampton, VA and Jefferson Lab, Newport News, VA USA, 53Physics Dept., Hampton University, Hampton, VA and Jefferson Lab, Newport News, VA USA, 54Physics Dept., Hampton University, Hampton, VA and Jefferson Lab, Newport News, VA USA, 55Physics Dept., Catholic University of America, Washington, DC USA, 56Physics Dept., Catholic University of America, Washington, DC USA, 57Physics Dept., Catholic University of America, Washington, DC USA, 58Temple University, Philadelphia PA USA, 59Temple University, Philadelphia PA USA, 60Temple University, Philadelphia PA USA, 61Temple University, Philadelphia PA USA, 62Temple University, Philadelphia PA USA, 63University Bonn, Bonn Germany, 64University Bonn, Bonn Germany, 65University Bonn, Bonn Germany, 66Physikalisches Institut Justus-Liebig-Universitt Giessen, Giessen Germany, 67Physikalisches Institut Justus-Liebig-Universitt Giessen, Giessen Germany

We give a short overview of the DarkLight detector concept which is designed to search for a heavy photon A' with a mass in the range 10 MeV/c^2 < m(A') < 90 MeV/c^2 and which decays to lepton pairs. We describe the intended operating environment, the Jefferson Laboratory free electon laser, and a way to extend DarkLight's reach using A' --> invisible decays. Read More

2013May
Affiliations: 1Laboratory for Nuclear Science, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, 2Department of Physics, Arizona State University, 3Department of Physics, Arizona State University, 4Free Electron Laser Group, Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility, VA, 5Laboratory for Nuclear Science, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, 6Free Electron Laser Group, Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility, VA, 7Laboratory for Nuclear Science, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, 8Free Electron Laser Group, Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility, VA, 9Free Electron Laser Group, Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility, VA, 10Laboratory for Nuclear Science, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, 11Laboratory for Nuclear Science, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, 12Department of Physics, Hampton University, 13Laboratory for Nuclear Science, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, 14Free Electron Laser Group, Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility, VA, 15Laboratory for Nuclear Science, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, 16Free Electron Laser Group, Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility, VA, 17Laboratory for Nuclear Science, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, 18Laboratory for Nuclear Science, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, 19Free Electron Laser Group, Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility, VA, 20Free Electron Laser Group, Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility, VA, 21Free Electron Laser Group, Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility, VA

Tests were performed to pass a 100 MeV, 430 kWatt c.w. electron beam from the energy-recovery linac at the Jefferson Laboratory's FEL facility through a set of small apertures in a 127 mm long aluminum block. Read More

2013May
Affiliations: 1Department of Physics, Arizona State University, USA, 2Department of Physics, Arizona State University, USA, 3Free Electron Laser Group, Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility, VA USA, 4Laboratory for Nuclear Science, Massachussetts Institute of Technology, USA, 5Free Electron Laser Group, Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility, VA USA, 6Laboratory for Nuclear Science, Massachussetts Institute of Technology, USA, 7Free Electron Laser Group, Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility, VA USA, 8Free Electron Laser Group, Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility, VA USA, 9Laboratory for Nuclear Science, Massachussetts Institute of Technology, USA, 10Laboratory for Nuclear Science, Massachussetts Institute of Technology, USA, 11Department of Physics, Hampton University, VA USA, 12Laboratory for Nuclear Science, Massachussetts Institute of Technology, USA, 13Department of Physics, College of William and Mary, Williamsburg, USA, 14Free Electron Laser Group, Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility, VA USA, 15Department of Physics, University of New Hampshire, USA, 16Laboratory for Nuclear Science, Massachussetts Institute of Technology, USA, 17Free Electron Laser Group, Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility, VA USA, 18Laboratory for Nuclear Science, Massachussetts Institute of Technology, USA, 19Laboratory for Nuclear Science, Massachussetts Institute of Technology, USA, 20Free Electron Laser Group, Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility, VA USA, 21Laboratory for Nuclear Science, Massachussetts Institute of Technology, USA, 22Free Electron Laser Group, Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility, VA USA, 23Free Electron Laser Group, Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility, VA USA

We report measurements of photon and neutron radiation levels observed while transmitting a 0.43 MW electron beam through millimeter-sized apertures and during beam-off, but accelerating gradient RF-on, operation. These measurements were conducted at the Free-Electron Laser (FEL) facility of the Jefferson National Accelerator Laboratory (JLab) using a 100 MeV electron beam from an energy-recovery linear accelerator. Read More

High power, relativistic electron beams from energy recovery linacs have great potential to realize new experimental paradigms for pioneering innovation in fundamental and applied research. A major design consideration for this new generation of experimental capabilities is the understanding of the halo associated with these bright, intense beams. In this Letter, we report on measurements performed using the 100 MeV, 430 kWatt CW electron beam from the energy recovery linac at the Jefferson Laboratory's Free Electron Laser facility as it traversed a set of small apertures in a 127 mm long aluminum block. Read More