C. Han - Department of Physics, Chungbuk National University, Korea

C. Han
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Name
C. Han
Affiliation
Department of Physics, Chungbuk National University, Korea
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Earth and Planetary Astrophysics (18)
 
High Energy Physics - Phenomenology (13)
 
Instrumentation and Methods for Astrophysics (10)
 
High Energy Physics - Experiment (10)
 
Solar and Stellar Astrophysics (7)
 
Mathematics - Information Theory (3)
 
Physics - Instrumentation and Detectors (3)
 
Computer Science - Information Theory (3)
 
Cosmology and Nongalactic Astrophysics (3)
 
Physics - Materials Science (2)
 
Astrophysics of Galaxies (2)
 
Physics - Strongly Correlated Electrons (1)
 
General Relativity and Quantum Cosmology (1)
 
Physics - Superconductivity (1)
 
Physics - Mesoscopic Systems and Quantum Hall Effect (1)
 
Mathematics - Group Theory (1)
 
Physics - Optics (1)
 
Physics - Chemical Physics (1)
 
Mathematics - Combinatorics (1)

Publications Authored By C. Han

We present a new "completed event" microlensing event-finder algorithm and apply it to the 2015 Korea Microlensing Telescope Network (KMTNet) data. The algorithm works by making linear fits to a (t0,teff,u0) grid of point-lens microlensing models. This approach is rendered computationally efficient by restricting u0 to just two values (0 and 1), which we show is quite adequate. Read More

We analyze the single microlensing event OGLE-2015-BLG-1482 simultaneously observed from two ground-based surveys and from \textit{Spitzer}. The \textit{Spitzer} data exhibit finite-source effects due to the passage of the lens close to or directly over the surface of the source star as seen from \textit{Spitzer}. Such finite-source effects generally yield measurements of the angular Einstein radius, which when combined with the microlens parallax derived from a comparison between the ground-based and the \textit{Spitzer} light curves, yields the lens mass and lens-source relative parallax. Read More

Organic semiconductors possess an intrinsic energetic disorder characteristic, which holds an exceptionally important role for understanding organic photovoltaic (OPV) operations and future optimizations. We performed illumination intensity dependence of capacitance-voltage (C-V) measurements in PIDTDTQx:PC70BM based organic bulk heterojunction (BHJ) photovoltaic systems in working conditions. Energetic disorder profiles for the active layer, PIDTDTQx:PC70BM, changed significantly when different interfaces were involved. Read More

We analyze an ensemble of microlensing events from the 2015 Spitzer microlensing campaign, all of which were densely monitored by ground-based high-cadence survey teams. The simultaneous observations from Spitzer and the ground yield measurements of the microlensing parallax vector $\pi_{\rm E}$, from which compact constraints on the microlens properties are derived, including $\lesssim$25\% uncertainties on the lens mass and distance. With the current sample, we demonstrate that the majority of microlenses are indeed in the mass range of M dwarfs. Read More

A novel instantaneous GNSS ambiguity resolution approach which makes use of only single-frequency carrier phase measurements for ultra-short baseline attitude determination is proposed. The Monte Carlo sampling method is employed to obtain the probability density function of ambiguities from a quaternion-based GNSS-attitude model and the LAMBDA method strengthened with a screening mechanism is then utilized to fix the integer values. Experimental results show that 100% success rate could be achieved for ultra-short baselines. Read More

In this paper, we apply the Maximum Entropy Method to estimate the proton radius and determine the valence quark distributions in the proton at very low resolution scale Q$^{2}$. Using the simplest functional form of the valence quark distribution and standard deviations of quark distribution functions in the estimation of the proton radius, we obtain a quadratic polynomial that the relationship between the proton radius and the momentum fraction of other non-perturbative components in the proton. The proton radii are approximately equal to the muonic hydrogen experimental result $r_p$ = 0. Read More

Chang-Refsdal (C-R) lensing, which refers to the gravitational lensing of a point mass perturbed by a constant external shear, provides a good approximation in describing lensing behaviors of either a very wide or a very close binary lens. C-R lensing events, which are identified by short-term anomalies near the peak of a high-magnification lensing light curves, are routinely detected from lensing surveys, but not much attention is paid to them. In this paper, we point out that C-R lensing events provide an important channel to detect planets in binaries, both in close and wide binary systems. Read More

2016Dec
Affiliations: 1ASIAA Hilo Office, 2Academia Sinica Institute of Astronomy & Astrophysics, 3Academia Sinica Institute of Astronomy & Astrophysics, 4Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics, 5ASIAA Hilo Office, 6Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics, 7Academia Sinica Institute of Astronomy & Astrophysics, 8Academia Sinica Institute of Astronomy & Astrophysics, 9Academia Sinica Institute of Astronomy & Astrophysics, 10Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics, 11Academia Sinica Institute of Astronomy & Astrophysics, 12Academia Sinica Institute of Astronomy & Astrophysics, 13Academia Sinica Institute of Astronomy & Astrophysics, 14National Chung-Shan Institute of Science and Technology, 15Academia Sinica Institute of Astronomy & Astrophysics, 16Academia Sinica Institute of Astronomy & Astrophysics, 17ASIAA Hilo Office, 18Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics, 19Academia Sinica Institute of Astronomy & Astrophysics, 20National Chung-Shan Institute of Science and Technology, 21Academia Sinica Institute of Astronomy & Astrophysics, 22Academia Sinica Institute of Astronomy & Astrophysics, 23Academia Sinica Institute of Astronomy & Astrophysics, 24Academia Sinica Institute of Astronomy & Astrophysics, 25Academia Sinica Institute of Astronomy & Astrophysics, 26Academia Sinica Institute of Astronomy & Astrophysics, 27Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics, 28Academia Sinica Institute of Astronomy & Astrophysics, 29Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics, 30Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics, 31Academia Sinica Institute of Astronomy & Astrophysics, 32ASIAA Hilo Office, 33Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics, 34ASIAA Hilo Office

Since the ALMA North America Prototype Antenna was awarded to the Smithsonian Astrophysical Observatory (SAO), SAO and the Academia Sinica Institute of Astronomy & Astrophysics (ASIAA) are working jointly to relocate the antenna to Greenland. This paper shows the status of the antenna retrofit and the work carried out after the recommissioning and subsequent disassembly of the antenna at the VLA has taken place. The next coming months will see the start of the antenna reassembly at Thule Air Base. Read More

Motivated by the latest results of the LHC Run-2 and LUX experiments, we examine the status of the constrained minimal supersymmetric standard model (CMSSM) by performing a global fit. We construct a likelihood function including the electroweak precision observables, $B$-physics measurements, LHC Run-1 and -2 data of SUSY direct searches, Planck observation of the dark matter relic density and the combined LUX Run-3 and -4 detection limits. Based on the profile likelihood functions of 1 billion samples, we obtain the following observations: (i) The stau coannihilation region has been mostly excluded by the latest LHC Run-2 data; (ii) The focus point region has been largely covered by the LUX-2016 limits while the $A$-funnel region has been severely restricted by flavor observables like $B_s \to \mu^+\mu^-$. Read More

The effects of temperature and humidity on the estimation of air pollution by benzene by using the piezoelectric crystal gas sensor were studied. Polyvinylchloride films were used as substrate for the immobilization of polymethylphenylsiloxane onto the electrode surface of the piezoelectric crystal. The sensing layer consisting of polymethylphenylsiloxane and polyvinylchloride was used for real-time monitoring of benzene, one of the atmospheric pollutants. Read More

Rapid satellite-to-site visibility determination is of great significance to coverage analysis of satellite constellations as well as onboard mission planning of autonomous spacecraft. This paper presents a novel self-adaptive Hermite interpolation technique for rapid satellite-to-site visibility determination. Piecewise cubic curves are utilized to approximate the waveform of the visibility function versus time. Read More

In this paper, we present the analysis of the binary gravitational microlensing event OGLE-2015-BLG-0196. The event lasted for almost a year and the light curve exhibited significant deviations from the lensing model based on the rectilinear lens-source relative motion, enabling us to measure the microlens parallax. The ground-based microlens parallax is confirmed by the data obtained from space-based microlens observations using the {\it Spitzer} telescope. Read More

In the process of analyzing an observed light curve, one often confronts various scenarios that can mimic the planetary signals causing difficulties in the accurate interpretation of the lens system. In this paper, we present the analysis of the microlensing event OGLE-2016-BLG-0733. The light curve of the event shows a long-term asymmetric perturbation that would appear to be due to a planet. Read More

2016Oct
Authors: D. de Florian1, C. Grojean2, F. Maltoni3, C. Mariotti4, A. Nikitenko5, M. Pieri6, P. Savard7, M. Schumacher8, R. Tanaka9, R. Aggleton10, M. Ahmad11, B. Allanach12, C. Anastasiou13, W. Astill14, S. Badger15, M. Badziak16, J. Baglio17, E. Bagnaschi18, A. Ballestrero19, A. Banfi20, D. Barducci21, M. Beckingham22, C. Becot23, G. Bélanger24, J. Bellm25, N. Belyaev26, F. U. Bernlochner27, C. Beskidt28, A. Biekötter29, F. Bishara30, W. Bizon31, N. E. Bomark32, M. Bonvini33, S. Borowka34, V. Bortolotto35, S. Boselli36, F. J. Botella37, R. Boughezal38, G. C. Branco39, J. Brehmer40, L. Brenner41, S. Bressler42, I. Brivio43, A. Broggio44, H. Brun45, G. Buchalla46, C. D. Burgard47, A. Calandri48, L. Caminada49, R. Caminal Armadans50, F. Campanario51, J. Campbell52, F. Caola53, C. M. Carloni Calame54, S. Carrazza55, A. Carvalho56, M. Casolino57, O. Cata58, A. Celis59, F. Cerutti60, N. Chanon61, M. Chen62, X. Chen63, B. Chokoufé Nejad64, N. Christensen65, M. Ciuchini66, R. Contino67, T. Corbett68, D. Curtin69, M. Dall'Osso70, A. David71, S. Dawson72, J. de Blas73, W. de Boer74, P. de Castro Manzano75, C. Degrande76, R. L. Delgado77, F. Demartin78, A. Denner79, B. Di Micco80, R. Di Nardo81, S. Dittmaier82, A. Dobado83, T. Dorigo84, F. A. Dreyer85, M. Dührssen86, C. Duhr87, F. Dulat88, K. Ecker89, K. Ellis90, U. Ellwanger91, C. Englert92, D. Espriu93, A. Falkowski94, L. Fayard95, R. Feger96, G. Ferrera97, A. Ferroglia98, N. Fidanza99, T. Figy100, M. Flechl101, D. Fontes102, S. Forte103, P. Francavilla104, E. Franco105, R. Frederix106, A. Freitas107, F. F. Freitas108, F. Frensch109, S. Frixione110, B. Fuks111, E. Furlan112, S. Gadatsch113, J. Gao114, Y. Gao115, M. V. Garzelli116, T. Gehrmann117, R. Gerosa118, M. Ghezzi119, D. Ghosh120, S. Gieseke121, D. Gillberg122, G. F. Giudice123, E. W. N. Glover124, F. Goertz125, D. Gonçalves126, J. Gonzalez-Fraile127, M. Gorbahn128, S. Gori129, C. A. Gottardo130, M. Gouzevitch131, P. Govoni132, D. Gray133, M. Grazzini134, N. Greiner135, A. Greljo136, J. Grigo137, A. V. Gritsan138, R. Gröber139, S. Guindon140, H. E. Haber141, C. Han142, T. Han143, R. Harlander144, M. A. Harrendorf145, H. B. Hartanto146, C. Hays147, S. Heinemeyer148, G. Heinrich149, M. Herrero150, F. Herzog151, B. Hespel152, V. Hirschi153, S. Hoeche154, S. Honeywell155, S. J. Huber156, C. Hugonie157, J. Huston158, A. Ilnicka159, G. Isidori160, B. Jäger161, M. Jaquier162, S. P. Jones163, A. Juste164, S. Kallweit165, A. Kaluza166, A. Kardos167, A. Karlberg168, Z. Kassabov169, N. Kauer170, D. I. Kazakov171, M. Kerner172, W. Kilian173, F. Kling174, K. Köneke175, R. Kogler176, R. Konoplich177, S. Kortner178, S. Kraml179, C. Krause180, F. Krauss181, M. Krawczyk182, A. Kulesza183, S. Kuttimalai184, R. Lane185, A. Lazopoulos186, G. Lee187, P. Lenzi188, I. M. Lewis189, Y. Li190, S. Liebler191, J. Lindert192, X. Liu193, Z. Liu194, F. J. Llanes-Estrada195, H. E. Logan196, D. Lopez-Val197, I. Low198, G. Luisoni199, P. Maierhöfer200, E. Maina201, B. Mansoulié202, H. Mantler203, M. Mantoani204, A. C. Marini205, V. I. Martinez Outschoorn206, S. Marzani207, D. Marzocca208, A. Massironi209, K. Mawatari210, J. Mazzitelli211, A. McCarn212, B. Mellado213, K. Melnikov214, S. B. Menari215, L. Merlo216, C. Meyer217, P. Milenovic218, K. Mimasu219, S. Mishima220, B. Mistlberger221, S. -O. Moch222, A. Mohammadi223, P. F. Monni224, G. Montagna225, M. Moreno Llácer226, N. Moretti227, S. Moretti228, L. Motyka229, A. Mück230, M. Mühlleitner231, S. Munir232, P. Musella233, P. Nadolsky234, D. Napoletano235, M. Nebot236, C. Neu237, M. Neubert238, R. Nevzorov239, O. Nicrosini240, J. Nielsen241, K. Nikolopoulos242, J. M. No243, C. O'Brien244, T. Ohl245, C. Oleari246, T. Orimoto247, D. Pagani248, C. E. Pandini249, A. Papaefstathiou250, A. S. Papanastasiou251, G. Passarino252, B. D. Pecjak253, M. Pelliccioni254, G. Perez255, L. Perrozzi256, F. Petriello257, G. Petrucciani258, E. Pianori259, F. Piccinini260, M. Pierini261, A. Pilkington262, S. Plätzer263, T. Plehn264, R. Podskubka265, C. T. Potter266, S. Pozzorini267, K. Prokofiev268, A. Pukhov269, I. Puljak270, M. Queitsch-Maitland271, J. Quevillon272, D. Rathlev273, M. Rauch274, E. Re275, M. N. Rebelo276, D. Rebuzzi277, L. Reina278, C. Reuschle279, J. Reuter280, M. Riembau281, F. Riva282, A. Rizzi283, T. Robens284, R. Röntsch285, J. Rojo286, J. C. Romão287, N. Rompotis288, J. Roskes289, R. Roth290, G. P. Salam291, R. Salerno292, R. Santos293, V. Sanz294, J. J. Sanz-Cillero295, H. Sargsyan296, U. Sarica297, P. Schichtel298, J. Schlenk299, T. Schmidt300, C. Schmitt301, M. Schönherr302, U. Schubert303, M. Schulze304, S. Sekula305, M. Sekulla306, E. Shabalina307, H. S. Shao308, J. Shelton309, C. H. Shepherd-Themistocleous310, S. Y. Shim311, F. Siegert312, A. Signer313, J. P. Silva314, L. Silvestrini315, M. Sjodahl316, P. Slavich317, M. Slawinska318, L. Soffi319, M. Spannowsky320, C. Speckner321, D. M. Sperka322, M. Spira323, O. Stål324, F. Staub325, T. Stebel326, T. Stefaniak327, M. Steinhauser328, I. W. Stewart329, M. J. Strassler330, J. Streicher331, D. M. Strom332, S. Su333, X. Sun334, F. J. Tackmann335, K. Tackmann336, A. M. Teixeira337, R. Teixeira de Lima338, V. Theeuwes339, R. Thorne340, D. Tommasini341, P. Torrielli342, M. Tosi343, F. Tramontano344, Z. Trócsányi345, M. Trott346, I. Tsinikos347, M. Ubiali348, P. Vanlaer349, W. Verkerke350, A. Vicini351, L. Viliani352, E. Vryonidou353, D. Wackeroth354, C. E. M. Wagner355, J. Wang356, S. Wayand357, G. Weiglein358, C. Weiss359, M. Wiesemann360, C. Williams361, J. Winter362, D. Winterbottom363, R. Wolf364, M. Xiao365, L. L. Yang366, R. Yohay367, S. P. Y. Yuen368, G. Zanderighi369, M. Zaro370, D. Zeppenfeld371, R. Ziegler372, T. Zirke373, J. Zupan374
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This Report summarizes the results of the activities of the LHC Higgs Cross Section Working Group in the period 2014-2016. The main goal of the working group was to present the state-of-the-art of Higgs physics at the LHC, integrating all new results that have appeared in the last few years. The first part compiles the most up-to-date predictions of Higgs boson production cross sections and decay branching ratios, parton distribution functions, and off-shell Higgs boson production and interference effects. Read More

In this paper, we determine the diameter of the commuting involution graphs of special and general linear groups over an arbitrary field. It turns out that our results also determine the diameter for certain projective special linear groups over finite fields. Moreover, we find the diameter of the commuting graphs of general linear groups on the set of all involutions over a field of characteristic 2, which completes the diameter of general linear groups on the set of all involutions. Read More

Recently ATLAS reported a $3.3\sigma$ excess in the stop search with $\ell+jets+E_T^{miss}$ channel. We try to interpret the signal by a light stop pair production in the MSSM. Read More

We present the analysis of the first circumbinary planet microlensing event, OGLE-2007-BLG-349. This event has a strong planetary signal that is best fit with a mass ratio of $q \approx 3.4\times10^{-4}$, but there is an additional signal due to an additional lens mass, either another planet or another star. Read More

We investigate a potential of measuring properties of a heavy resonance X, exploiting jet substructure techniques. Motivated by heavy higgs boson searches, we focus on the decays of X into a pair of (massive) electroweak gauge bosons. More specifically, we consider a hadronic Z boson, which makes it possible to determine properties of X at an earlier stage. Read More

We utilize the recent LHC-13 TeV data to study the lower mass bound on top-squark (stop) in natural supersymmetry. We recast the LHC sparticle inclusive search of $(\ge 1){\rm jets} + E^{miss}_T$ with $\alpha_T$ variable, the direct stop pair search (1-lepton channel and all-hadronic channel) and the monojet analyses. We find that these searches are complementary depending on stop and higgsino masses: for a heavy stop the all-hadronic stop pair search provides the strongest bound, for an intermediate stop the inclusive SUSY analysis with $\alpha_T$ variable is most efficient, while for a compressed stop-higgsino scenario the monojet search plays the key role. Read More

Optical fibre is drawn from a dual-head 3D printer fabricated preform made of two optically transparent plastics with a high index core (NA ~ 0.25, V > 60). The asymmetry observed in the fibre arises from asymmetry in the 3D printing process. Read More

In this Note, a new approach to spacecraft positioning based on GGT inversion is presented. The gravity gradient tensor is initially measured in the gradiometer reference frame (GRF) and then transformed to the Earth-Centered Earth-Fixed (ECEF) frame via attitude information as well as Earth rotation parameters. Matrix Eigen-Decomposition is introduced to directly translate GGT into position based on the fact that the eigenvalues and eigenvectors of GGT are simplespecific functions of spherical coordinates of the observation position. Read More

An innovative orbit determination method which makes use of gravity gradients for Low-Earth-Orbiting satellites is proposed. The measurement principle of gravity gradiometry is briefly reviewed and the sources of measurement error are analyzed. An adaptive hybrid least squares batch filter based on linearization of the orbital equation and unscented transformation of the measurement equation is developed to estimate the orbital states and the measurement biases. Read More

Spaceborne gravity gradients are proposed in this paper to provide autonomous orbit determination capabilities for near Earth satellites. The gravity gradients contain useful position information which can be extracted by matching the observations with a precise gravity model. The extended Kalman filter is investigated as the principal estimator. Read More

According to a basic rule of fermionic and bosonic many-body physics, known as the linked cluster theorem, physical observables are not affected by vacuum bubbles, which represent virtual particles created from vacuum and self-annihilating without interacting with real particles. Here, we show that this conventional knowledge must be revised for anyons, quasiparticles that obey fractional exchange statistics intermediate between fermions and bosons. We find that a certain class of vacuum bubbles of Abelian anyons does affect physical observables. Read More

We report the discovery of an extrasolar planet detected from the combined data of a microlensing event OGLE-2015-BLG-0051/KMT-2015-BLG-0048 acquired by two microlensing surveys. Despite that the short planetary signal occurred in the very early Bulge season during which the lensing event could be seen for just about an hour, the signal was continuously and densely covered. From the Bayesian analysis using models of the mass function, matter and velocity distributions combined with the information of the angular Einstein radius, it is found that the host of the planet is located in the Galactic bulge. Read More

We present a combined analysis of the observations of the gravitational microlensing event OGLE-2015-BLG-0479 taken both from the ground and by the {\it Spitzer Space Telescope}. The light curves seen from the ground and from space exhibit a time offset of $\sim 13$ days between the caustic spikes, indicating that the relative lens-source positions seen from the two places are displaced by parallax effects. From modeling the light curves, we measure the space-based microlens parallax. Read More

We consider a Kaluza-Klein (KK) graviton interpretation of the diphoton excesses observed recently at the LHC. The radion, the modulus of extra dimension, appears naturally light due to classical scale invariance in this scenario. Thus, due to the presence of a sizable wavefunction overlap in the extra dimension between the KK graviton and the radion, the KK graviton can decay largely into a pair of radions, each of which decays into a pair of collimated photons, the so called photon-jet. Read More

In this paper, we demonstrate the severity of the degeneracy between the microlens-parallax and lens-orbital effects by presenting the analysis of the gravitational binary-lens event OGLE-2015-BLG-0768. Despite the obvious deviation from the model based on the the linear observer motion and the static binary, it is found that the residual can be almost equally well explained by either the parallactic motion of the Earth or the rotation of the binary lens axis, resulting in the severe degeneracy between the two effects. We show that the degeneracy can be readily resolved with the additional data provided by space-based microlens parallax observations. Read More

Recently, the discovery of a Venus-mass planet orbiting a brown-dwarf host in a binary system was reported from the analysis of the microlensing event OGLE-2013-BLG-0723. We reanalyze the event considering the possibility of other interpretations. From this, we find a new solution where the lens is composed of 2 bodies in contrast to the 3-body solution of the previous analysis. Read More

In this paper, we report the discovery of a binary composed of a brown dwarf and a low-mass M dwarf from the observation of the microlensing event OGLE-2014-BLG-0257. Resolution of the very short-lasting caustic crossing combined with the detection of subtle continuous deviation in the lensing light curve induced by the Earth's orbital motion enable us to precisely measure both the Einstein radius \theta_E and the lens parallax pi_E, which are the two quantities needed to unambiguously determine the mass and distance to the lens. It is found that the companion is a substellar brown dwarf with a mass 0. Read More

More than 40 years after the first discussion, it was recently reported the detection of a self-lensing phenomenon within a binary system where the brightness of a background star is magnified by its foreground companion. It is expected that the number of self-lensing binary detections will be increased in a wealth of data from current and future survey experiments. In this paper, we introduce a degeneracy in the interpretation of self-lensing light curves. Read More

Two-dimensional black phosphorus has been configured as field-effect transistors, showing an intrinsic symmetric ambipolar transport characteristic. Here, we demonstrate the strongly modulated ambipolar characteristics of few-layer black phosphorus in oxygen. Pure oxygen exposure can dramatically decrease the electron mobility of black phosphorus without degrading the hole transport. Read More

A colored heavy particle with sufficiently small width may form non-relativistic bound states when they are produced at the large hadron collider\,(LHC), and they can annihilate into a diphoton final state. The invariant mass of the diphoton would be around twice of the colored particle mass. In this paper, we study if such bound state can be responsible for the 750 GeV diphoton excess reported by ATLAS and CMS. Read More

The 750 GeV diphoton excess reported by ATLAS and CMS indicates the presence of several pairs of the vector-like matter multiplets around TeV scale. If that is the case, radiative corrections from the $SU(3)$ gauge interaction significantly change from those of MSSM, and the infrared-free nature of the gauge interaction leads to characteristic SUSY mass spectra: a ratio of a squark mass to the gluino mass, and scalar trilinear couplings are enhanced at the low-energy scale. Consequently, even in gaugino mediation models, the Higgs boson mass of 125 GeV is explained with the fairly light gluino of 2-3 TeV, which can be accessible at the LHC. Read More

Two cold, gas giant planets orbiting a G-type main sequence star in the galactic disk have previously been discovered in the high magnification microlensing event OGLE-2012-BLG-0026 (Han et al. 2013). Here we present revised host star flux measurements and a refined model for the two-planet system using additional light curve data. Read More

Spitzer microlensing parallax observations of OGLE-2015-BLG-1212 decisively breaks a degeneracy between planetary and binary solutions that is somewhat ambiguous when only ground-based data are considered. Only eight viable models survive out of an initial set of 32 local minima in the parameter space. These models clearly indicate that the lens is a stellar binary system possibly located within the bulge of our Galaxy, ruling out the planetary alternative. Read More

The evidence of a new scalar particle $X$ from the 750 GeV diphoton excess, and the absence of any other signal of new physics at the LHC so far suggest the existence of new colored scalars, which may be moderately light and thus can induce sizable $X g g$ and $X \gamma \gamma$ couplings without resorting to very strong interactions. Motivated by this speculation, we extend the Manohar-Wise model by adding one gauge singlet scalar field. The resulting theory then predicts one singlet dominated scalar $\phi$ as well as three kinds of color-octet scalars, which can mediate through loops the $\phi gg$ and $\phi \gamma \gamma$ interactions. Read More

We consider the possibility of interpreting the recently reported diphoton excess at 750 GeV as a spin-two massive particle (such as a Kaluza-Klein graviton in warped extra-dimensions) which serves as a mediator to Dark Matter via its gravitational couplings to the dark sector and to the Standard Model (SM). We model non-universal couplings of the resonance to gauge bosons in the SM and to Dark Matter as a function on their localization in the extra dimension. We find that scalar, fermion or vector dark matter can saturate the dark matter relic density by the annihilation of dark matter into a pair of the SM particles or heavy resonances, in agreement with the diphoton resonance signal strength. Read More

Perturbative unitarity conditions have been playing an important role by estimating the energy scale of new physics, including the Higgs mass as one of the most important examples. In this letter, we show that there is a possibility to see the hint of a new physics (top quark partner) indirectly by observing an "apparent" unitarity violation in $M_{bw}$ distribution well above top quark mass in a process of a heavy resonance decaying into a pair of top quarks. Read More

2015Nov
Affiliations: 1The MOA Collaboration, 2The MOA Collaboration, 3The MOA Collaboration, 4The MOA Collaboration, 5The MOA Collaboration, 6The MOA Collaboration, 7The MOA Collaboration, 8The MOA Collaboration, 9The MOA Collaboration, 10The MOA Collaboration, 11The MOA Collaboration, 12The MOA Collaboration, 13The MOA Collaboration, 14The MOA Collaboration, 15The MOA Collaboration, 16The MOA Collaboration, 17The MOA Collaboration, 18The MOA Collaboration, 19The MOA Collaboration, 20The MOA Collaboration, 21The MOA Collaboration, 22The MOA Collaboration, 23The MOA Collaboration, 24The MOA Collaboration, 25The MOA Collaboration, 26The MOA Collaboration, 27The MOA Collaboration, 28The MOA Collaboration, 29The MOA Collaboration, 30The MOA Collaboration, 31The MOA Collaboration, 32The MOA Collaboration, 33The MOA Collaboration, 34The MOA Collaboration, 35The MOA Collaboration, 36The MOA Collaboration, 37The MOA Collaboration

We present the discovery of the first Neptune analog exoplanet or super-Earth with Neptune-like orbit, MOA-2013-BLG-605Lb. This planet has a mass similar to that of Neptune or a super-Earth and it orbits at $9\sim 14$ times the expected position of the snow-line, $a_{\rm snow}$, which is similar to Neptune's separation of $ 11\,a_{\rm snow}$ from the Sun. The planet/host-star mass ratio is $q=(3. Read More

We study the effects of the Higgs directly coupled to the inflaton on the primordial power spectrum. The quadratic coupling between the Higgs and the inflaton stabilizes the Higgs in the electroweak vacuum during inflation by inducing a large effective mass for the Higgs, which also leads to oscillatory features in the primordial power spectrum due to the oscillating classical background. Meanwhile, the features from quantum fluctuations exhibit simple monotonic k-dependence and are subleading compared to the classical contributions. Read More

Using high-resolution angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy and scanning tunneling microscopy/spectroscopy, the atomic and low energy electronic structure of the Sr-doped superconducting topological insulators (SrxBi2Se3) was studied. Scanning tunneling microscopy shows that most of the Sr atoms are not in the van der Waals gap. After Sr doping, the Fermi level was found to move further upwards when compared with the parent compound Bi2Se3, which is consistent with the low carrier density in this system. Read More

For all exoplanet candidates, the reliability of a claimed detection needs to be assessed through a careful study of systematic errors in the data to minimize the false positives rate. We present a method to investigate such systematics in microlensing datasets using the microlensing event OGLE-2013-BLG-0446 as a case study. The event was observed from multiple sites around the world and its high magnification (A_{max} \sim 3000) allowed us to investigate the effects of terrestrial and annual parallax. Read More

We report on the mass and distance measurements of two single-lens events from the 2015 \emph{Spitzer} microlensing campaign. With both finite-source effect and microlens parallax measurements, we find that the lens of OGLE-2015-BLG-1268 is very likely a brown dwarf. Assuming that the source star lies behind the same amount of dust as the Bulge red clump, we find the lens is a $45\pm7$ $M_{\rm J}$ brown dwarf at $5. Read More

In this paper we consider high-intensity source of electron antineutrinos from the production and subsequent decay of 8Li. It opens a wide range of possible searches for beyond standard model physics via studies of the inverse beta decay interaction. In IsoDAR experiments Lithium 8 is a short lived beta emitter producing a high intensity anti-neutrinos, which is very suitable for making several important neutrino experiments. Read More