C. E. Wagner - University of Chicago, Chicago, IL USA

C. E. Wagner
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Name
C. E. Wagner
Affiliation
University of Chicago, Chicago, IL USA
City
Chicago
Country
United States

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High Energy Physics - Phenomenology (13)
 
High Energy Physics - Experiment (8)
 
Physics - Soft Condensed Matter (6)
 
Computer Science - Artificial Intelligence (5)
 
Physics - Physics and Society (5)
 
Computer Science - Digital Libraries (4)
 
Computer Science - Computers and Society (4)
 
Physics - Biological Physics (4)
 
Physics - Fluid Dynamics (3)
 
Cosmology and Nongalactic Astrophysics (3)
 
Computer Science - Logic in Computer Science (2)
 
Astrophysics of Galaxies (2)
 
Physics - Statistical Mechanics (2)
 
Physics - Materials Science (2)
 
Computer Science - Human-Computer Interaction (2)
 
Physics - Strongly Correlated Electrons (1)
 
Statistics - Applications (1)
 
Physics - Mesoscopic Systems and Quantum Hall Effect (1)
 
Quantitative Biology - Biomolecules (1)
 
Computer Science - Cryptography and Security (1)
 
Quantitative Biology - Cell Behavior (1)
 
Computer Science - Computer Science and Game Theory (1)

Publications Authored By C. E. Wagner

Scientific collaborations shape novel ideas and new discoveries and help scientists to advance their scientific career through publishing high impact publications and grant proposals. Recent studies however show that gender inequality is still present in many scientific practices ranging from hiring to peer review processes and grant applications. While empirical findings highlight that collaborations impact success and gender inequality is present in science, we know little about gender-specific differences in collaboration patterns, how they change over time and how they impact scientific success. Read More

We present a model to probe metamagnetic properties in systems with an arbitrary number of interacting spins. Thermodynamic properties such as the magnetization per particle $m(B,T,N)$, linear susceptibility $\chi_1(T)$, nonlinear susceptibilities $\chi_3(T)$ and $\chi_5(T)$, specific heat $C(B,T,N)$, and pressure $P(B,T,N)$ were calculated. The model produces a different magnetic response for $N$ particles when comparing to $N - 1$ particles for small $N \sim 1$. Read More

We present a comprehensive study of the modifications of Higgs couplings in the SO(5)/SO(4) minimal composite model. We focus on three couplings of central importance to Higgs phenomenology at the LHC: the couplings to top and bottom quarks and the coupling to two gluons. We consider three possible embeddings of the fermionic partners in 5, 10 and 14 of SO(5) and find tth and bbh couplings to be always suppressed in 5 and 10, while in 14 they can be either enhanced or suppressed. Read More

We present a theory of flagellar synchronization in the green alga Chlamydomonas, using full treatment of flagellar hydrodynamics. We find that two recently proposed synchronization mechanisms, basal coupling and flagellar waveform compliance, stabilize anti-phase synchronization if operative in isolation. Their nonlinear superposition, however, stabilizes in-phase synchronization as observed in experiments. Read More

Native horse mucus is characterized with micro- and macrorheology and compared to hydroxyethylcellulose (HEC) gel as a model. Both systems show comparable viscoelastic properties on the microscale and for the HEC the macrorheology is in good agreement with the microrheology. For the mucus, the viscoelastic moduli on the macroscale are several orders of magnitude larger than on the microscale. Read More

Plasma proteins such as fibrinogen induce the aggregation of red blood cells (RBC) into rouleaux, which are responsible for the pronounced shear thinning behavior of blood, control the erythro- cyte sedimentation rate (ESR) a common hematological test and are involved in many situations of physiological relevance such as structuration of blood in the microcirculation or clot formation in pathological situations. Confocal microscopy is used to characterize the shape of RBCs within rouleaux at equilibrium as a function of macromolecular concentration, revealing the diversity of contact zone morphology. Three different configurations that have only been partly predicted before are identified, namely parachute, male-female and sigmoid shapes, and quantitatively recovered by numerical simulations. Read More

Sampling from large networks represents a fundamental challenge for social network research. In this paper, we explore the sensitivity of different sampling techniques (node sampling, edge sampling, random walk sampling, and snowball sampling) on social networks with attributes. We consider the special case of networks (i) where we have one attribute with two values (e. Read More

Homophily can put minority groups at a disadvantage by restricting their ability to establish links with people from a majority group. This can limit the overall visibility of minorities in the network. Building on a Barab\'{a}si-Albert model variation with groups and homophily, we show how the visibility of minority groups in social networks is a function of (i) their relative group size and (ii) the presence or absence of homophilic behavior. Read More

We study the constraints on neutralino dark matter in minimal low energy supersymmetry models and the case of heavy lepton and quark scalar superpartners. For values of the Higgsino and gaugino mass parameters of the order of the weak scale, direct detection experiments are already putting strong bounds on models in which the dominant interactions between the dark matter candidates and nuclei are governed by Higgs boson exchange processes, particularly for positive values of the Higgsino mass parameter mu. For negative values of mu, there can be destructive interference between the amplitudes associated with the exchange of the standard CP-even Higgs boson and the exchange of the non-standard one. Read More

International collaboration in science continues to grow at a remarkable rate, but little agreement exists about dynamics of growth and organization at the discipline level. Some suggest that disciplines differ in their collaborative tendencies, reflecting their epistemic culture. This study examines collaborative patterns in six previously studied specialties to add new data and conduct analyses over time. Read More

Wikipedia articles about the same topic in different language editions are built around different sources of information. For example, one can find very different news articles linked as references in the English Wikipedia article titled "Annexation of Crimea by the Russian Federation" than in its German counterpart (determined via Wikipedia's language links). Some of this difference can of course be attributed to the different language proficiencies of readers and editors in separate language editions, yet, although including English-language news sources seems to be no issue in the German edition, English references that are listed do not overlap highly with the ones in the article's English version. Read More

The hydrodynamics-induced pairing mechanism of deformable closed bilayer membranes (vesicles, a model for red blood cells) is studied numerically with a special attention paid to the role of the confinement (the vesicles are within two rigid walls). This study unveils the complexity of the pairing mechanism due to hydrodynamic interactions. At weak confinement we find that two vesicles attract each other and form a stable pair if their initial distance is below a certain value. Read More

Precision measurements of the 125 GeV Higgs resonance recently discovered at the LHC have determined that its properties are similar to the ones of the Standard Model (SM) Higgs boson. However, the current uncertainties in the determination of the Higgs boson couplings leave room for significant deviations from the SM expectations. In fact, if one assumes no correlation between the top-quark and gluon couplings to the Higgs, the current global fit to the Higgs data lead to central values of the Higgs couplings to the bottom-quark and the top-quark that are about 2 $\sigma$ away from the SM predictions. Read More

We develop a formally exact technique for obtaining steady-state distributions of non-interacting active Brownian particles in a variety of systems. Our technique draws on results from the theory of two-way diffusion equations to solve the steady-state Smoluchowski equation for the 1-particle distribution function. The methods are employed to study in detail three scenarios: 1) confinement in a channel, 2) a constant flux steady state, and 3) sedimentation in a uniform external field. Read More

2016Oct
Authors: D. de Florian1, C. Grojean2, F. Maltoni3, C. Mariotti4, A. Nikitenko5, M. Pieri6, P. Savard7, M. Schumacher8, R. Tanaka9, R. Aggleton10, M. Ahmad11, B. Allanach12, C. Anastasiou13, W. Astill14, S. Badger15, M. Badziak16, J. Baglio17, E. Bagnaschi18, A. Ballestrero19, A. Banfi20, D. Barducci21, M. Beckingham22, C. Becot23, G. Bélanger24, J. Bellm25, N. Belyaev26, F. U. Bernlochner27, C. Beskidt28, A. Biekötter29, F. Bishara30, W. Bizon31, N. E. Bomark32, M. Bonvini33, S. Borowka34, V. Bortolotto35, S. Boselli36, F. J. Botella37, R. Boughezal38, G. C. Branco39, J. Brehmer40, L. Brenner41, S. Bressler42, I. Brivio43, A. Broggio44, H. Brun45, G. Buchalla46, C. D. Burgard47, A. Calandri48, L. Caminada49, R. Caminal Armadans50, F. Campanario51, J. Campbell52, F. Caola53, C. M. Carloni Calame54, S. Carrazza55, A. Carvalho56, M. Casolino57, O. Cata58, A. Celis59, F. Cerutti60, N. Chanon61, M. Chen62, X. Chen63, B. Chokoufé Nejad64, N. Christensen65, M. Ciuchini66, R. Contino67, T. Corbett68, D. Curtin69, M. Dall'Osso70, A. David71, S. Dawson72, J. de Blas73, W. de Boer74, P. de Castro Manzano75, C. Degrande76, R. L. Delgado77, F. Demartin78, A. Denner79, B. Di Micco80, R. Di Nardo81, S. Dittmaier82, A. Dobado83, T. Dorigo84, F. A. Dreyer85, M. Dührssen86, C. Duhr87, F. Dulat88, K. Ecker89, K. Ellis90, U. Ellwanger91, C. Englert92, D. Espriu93, A. Falkowski94, L. Fayard95, R. Feger96, G. Ferrera97, A. Ferroglia98, N. Fidanza99, T. Figy100, M. Flechl101, D. Fontes102, S. Forte103, P. Francavilla104, E. Franco105, R. Frederix106, A. Freitas107, F. F. Freitas108, F. Frensch109, S. Frixione110, B. Fuks111, E. Furlan112, S. Gadatsch113, J. Gao114, Y. Gao115, M. V. Garzelli116, T. Gehrmann117, R. Gerosa118, M. Ghezzi119, D. Ghosh120, S. Gieseke121, D. Gillberg122, G. F. Giudice123, E. W. N. Glover124, F. Goertz125, D. Gonçalves126, J. Gonzalez-Fraile127, M. Gorbahn128, S. Gori129, C. A. Gottardo130, M. Gouzevitch131, P. Govoni132, D. Gray133, M. Grazzini134, N. Greiner135, A. Greljo136, J. Grigo137, A. V. Gritsan138, R. Gröber139, S. Guindon140, H. E. Haber141, C. Han142, T. Han143, R. Harlander144, M. A. Harrendorf145, H. B. Hartanto146, C. Hays147, S. Heinemeyer148, G. Heinrich149, M. Herrero150, F. Herzog151, B. Hespel152, V. Hirschi153, S. Hoeche154, S. Honeywell155, S. J. Huber156, C. Hugonie157, J. Huston158, A. Ilnicka159, G. Isidori160, B. Jäger161, M. Jaquier162, S. P. Jones163, A. Juste164, S. Kallweit165, A. Kaluza166, A. Kardos167, A. Karlberg168, Z. Kassabov169, N. Kauer170, D. I. Kazakov171, M. Kerner172, W. Kilian173, F. Kling174, K. Köneke175, R. Kogler176, R. Konoplich177, S. Kortner178, S. Kraml179, C. Krause180, F. Krauss181, M. Krawczyk182, A. Kulesza183, S. Kuttimalai184, R. Lane185, A. Lazopoulos186, G. Lee187, P. Lenzi188, I. M. Lewis189, Y. Li190, S. Liebler191, J. Lindert192, X. Liu193, Z. Liu194, F. J. Llanes-Estrada195, H. E. Logan196, D. Lopez-Val197, I. Low198, G. Luisoni199, P. Maierhöfer200, E. Maina201, B. Mansoulié202, H. Mantler203, M. Mantoani204, A. C. Marini205, V. I. Martinez Outschoorn206, S. Marzani207, D. Marzocca208, A. Massironi209, K. Mawatari210, J. Mazzitelli211, A. McCarn212, B. Mellado213, K. Melnikov214, S. B. Menari215, L. Merlo216, C. Meyer217, P. Milenovic218, K. Mimasu219, S. Mishima220, B. Mistlberger221, S. -O. Moch222, A. Mohammadi223, P. F. Monni224, G. Montagna225, M. Moreno Llácer226, N. Moretti227, S. Moretti228, L. Motyka229, A. Mück230, M. Mühlleitner231, S. Munir232, P. Musella233, P. Nadolsky234, D. Napoletano235, M. Nebot236, C. Neu237, M. Neubert238, R. Nevzorov239, O. Nicrosini240, J. Nielsen241, K. Nikolopoulos242, J. M. No243, C. O'Brien244, T. Ohl245, C. Oleari246, T. Orimoto247, D. Pagani248, C. E. Pandini249, A. Papaefstathiou250, A. S. Papanastasiou251, G. Passarino252, B. D. Pecjak253, M. Pelliccioni254, G. Perez255, L. Perrozzi256, F. Petriello257, G. Petrucciani258, E. Pianori259, F. Piccinini260, M. Pierini261, A. Pilkington262, S. Plätzer263, T. Plehn264, R. Podskubka265, C. T. Potter266, S. Pozzorini267, K. Prokofiev268, A. Pukhov269, I. Puljak270, M. Queitsch-Maitland271, J. Quevillon272, D. Rathlev273, M. Rauch274, E. Re275, M. N. Rebelo276, D. Rebuzzi277, L. Reina278, C. Reuschle279, J. Reuter280, M. Riembau281, F. Riva282, A. Rizzi283, T. Robens284, R. Röntsch285, J. Rojo286, J. C. Romão287, N. Rompotis288, J. Roskes289, R. Roth290, G. P. Salam291, R. Salerno292, R. Santos293, V. Sanz294, J. J. Sanz-Cillero295, H. Sargsyan296, U. Sarica297, P. Schichtel298, J. Schlenk299, T. Schmidt300, C. Schmitt301, M. Schönherr302, U. Schubert303, M. Schulze304, S. Sekula305, M. Sekulla306, E. Shabalina307, H. S. Shao308, J. Shelton309, C. H. Shepherd-Themistocleous310, S. Y. Shim311, F. Siegert312, A. Signer313, J. P. Silva314, L. Silvestrini315, M. Sjodahl316, P. Slavich317, M. Slawinska318, L. Soffi319, M. Spannowsky320, C. Speckner321, D. M. Sperka322, M. Spira323, O. Stål324, F. Staub325, T. Stebel326, T. Stefaniak327, M. Steinhauser328, I. W. Stewart329, M. J. Strassler330, J. Streicher331, D. M. Strom332, S. Su333, X. Sun334, F. J. Tackmann335, K. Tackmann336, A. M. Teixeira337, R. Teixeira de Lima338, V. Theeuwes339, R. Thorne340, D. Tommasini341, P. Torrielli342, M. Tosi343, F. Tramontano344, Z. Trócsányi345, M. Trott346, I. Tsinikos347, M. Ubiali348, P. Vanlaer349, W. Verkerke350, A. Vicini351, L. Viliani352, E. Vryonidou353, D. Wackeroth354, C. E. M. Wagner355, J. Wang356, S. Wayand357, G. Weiglein358, C. Weiss359, M. Wiesemann360, C. Williams361, J. Winter362, D. Winterbottom363, R. Wolf364, M. Xiao365, L. L. Yang366, R. Yohay367, S. P. Y. Yuen368, G. Zanderighi369, M. Zaro370, D. Zeppenfeld371, R. Ziegler372, T. Zirke373, J. Zupan374
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This Report summarizes the results of the activities of the LHC Higgs Cross Section Working Group in the period 2014-2016. The main goal of the working group was to present the state-of-the-art of Higgs physics at the LHC, integrating all new results that have appeared in the last few years. The first part compiles the most up-to-date predictions of Higgs boson production cross sections and decay branching ratios, parton distribution functions, and off-shell Higgs boson production and interference effects. Read More

Journal maps and classifications for 11,359 journals listed in the combined Journal Citation Reports 2015 of the Science and Social Sciences Citation Indexes are provided at http://www.leydesdorff.net/jcr15. Read More

We explore 7.5 billion years of evolution in the star formation activity of massive ($M_{\star}>10^{10.1}\,M_{\odot}$) cluster galaxies using a sample of 25 clusters over $0. Read More

Supersymmetric extensions of the standard model contain additional heavy neutral Higgs bosons that are coupled to heavy scalar top quarks (stops). This system exhibits interesting field theoretic phenomena when the Higgs mass is close to the stop-antistop production threshold. Existing work in the literature has examined the digluon-to-diphoton cross section near threshold and has focused on enhancements in the cross section that might arise either from the perturbative contributions to the Higgs-to-digluon and Higgs-to-diphoton form factors or from mixing of the Higgs boson with stoponium states. Read More

An important issue in public goods game is whether player's behaviour changes over time, and if so, how significant it is. In this game players can be classified into different groups according to the level of their participation in the public good. This problem can be considered as a concept drift problem by asking the amount of change that happens to the clusters of players over a sequence of game rounds. Read More

An important role carried out by cyber-security experts is the assessment of proposed computer systems, during their design stage. This task is fraught with difficulties and uncertainty, making the knowledge provided by human experts essential for successful assessment. Today, the increasing number of progressively complex systems has led to an urgent need to produce tools that support the expert-led process of system-security assessment. Read More

We present experiments on RBCs that flow through microcapillaries under physiological conditions. We show that the RBC clusters form as a subtle imbrication between hydrodynamics interaction and adhesion forces because of plasma proteins. Clusters form along the capillaries and macromolecule-induced adhesion contribute to their stability. Read More

In this position paper, we present ideas about creating a next generation framework towards an adaptive interface for data communication and visualisation systems. Our objective is to develop a system that accepts large data sets as inputs and provides user-centric, meaningful visual information to assist owners to make sense of their data collection. The proposed framework comprises four stages: (i) the knowledge base compilation, where we search and collect existing state-ofthe-art visualisation techniques per domain and user preferences; (ii) the development of the learning and inference system, where we apply artificial intelligence techniques to learn, predict and recommend new graphic interpretations (iii) results evaluation; and (iv) reinforcement and adaptation, where valid outputs are stored in our knowledge base and the system is iteratively tuned to address new demands. Read More

Fuzzy Rule-Based Classification Systems (FRBCSs) have the potential to provide so-called interpretable classifiers, i.e. classifiers which can be introspective, understood, validated and augmented by human experts by relying on fuzzy-set based rules. Read More

In the context of cancer treatment and surgery, quality of life assessment is a crucial part of determining treatment success and viability. In order to assess it, patients completed questionnaires which employ words to capture aspects of patients well-being are the norm. As the results of these questionnaires are often used to assess patient progress and to determine future treatment options, it is important to establish that the words used are interpreted in the same way by both patients and medical professionals. Read More

This study optimises manually derived rule-based expert system classification of objects according to changes in their properties over time. One of the key challenges that this study tries to address is how to classify objects that exhibit changes in their behaviour over time, for example how to classify companies' share price stability over a period of time or how to classify students' preferences for subjects while they are progressing through school. A specific case the paper considers is the strategy of players in public goods games (as common in economics) across multiple consecutive games. Read More

Many new physics models contain a neutral scalar resonance that can be predominantly produced via gluon fusion through loops. In such a case, there could be important effects of additional particles, that in turn may hadronize before decaying and form bound states. This interesting possibility may lead to novel signatures with double peaks that can be searched for at the LHC. Read More

Computational social scientists often harness the Web as a "societal observatory" where data about human social behavior is collected. This data enables novel investigations of psychological, anthropological and sociological research questions. However, in the absence of demographic information, such as gender, many relevant research questions cannot be addressed. Read More

Non-aligning self-propelled particles with purely repulsive excluded volume interactions undergo athermal motility-induced phase separation into a dilute gas and a dense cluster phase. Here, we use enhanced sampling computational methods and analytic theory to examine the kinetics of formation of the dense phase. Despite the intrinsically nonequilibrium nature of the phase transition, we show that the kinetics can be described using an approach analogous to equilibrium classical nucleation theory, governed by an effective free energy of cluster formation with identifiable bulk and surface terms. Read More

It is pointed out that in a wide class of models reminiscent of type-II Two-Higgs-Doublet Models (2HDM) the signal of the Higgs produced in association with a top-antitop quark pair ($tth$) and decaying into gauge bosons can be significantly larger than the Standard Model (SM) prediction without violating any experimental constraints. The crucial feature of these models is enhanced (suppressed) Higgs coupling to top (bottom) quarks and existence of light colored particles that give negative contribution to the effective Higgs coupling to gluons resulting in the gluon fusion rates in the gauge boson decay channels close to SM predictions. We demonstrate this mechanism in NMSSM with light stops and show that $tth$ signal in the $WW$ decay channel can be two times larger than the SM prediction, as suggested by the excesses observed by ATLAS and CMS, provided that the Higgs-singlet superpotential coupling $\lambda\gtrsim0. Read More

Contributing to the writing of history has never been as easy as it is today thanks to Wikipedia, a community-created encyclopedia that aims to document the world's knowledge from a neutral point of view. Though everyone can participate it is well known that the editor community has a narrow diversity, with a majority of white male editors. While this participatory \emph{gender gap} has been studied extensively in the literature, this work sets out to \emph{assess potential gender inequalities in Wikipedia articles} along different dimensions: notability, topical focus, linguistic bias, structural properties, and meta-data presentation. Read More

We introduce and explore new heavy Higgs scenarios in the Minimal Supersymmetric Standard Model (MSSM) with explicit CP violation, which have important phenomenological implications that may be testable at the LHC. For soft supersymmetry-breaking scales M_S above a few TeV and a charged Higgs boson mass M_H+ above a few hundred GeV, new physics effects including those from explicit CP violation decouple from the light Higgs boson sector. However, such effects can significantly alter the phenomenology of the heavy Higgs bosons while still being consistent with constraints from low-energy observables, for instance electric dipole moments. Read More

We study the correlation between the value of the triple Higgs coupling and the nature of the electroweak phase transition. We use an effective potential approach, including higher order, non-renormalizable terms coming from integrating out new physics. We show that if only the dimension six operators are considered, large positive deviations of the triple Higgs coupling from its Standard Model (SM) value are predicted in the regions of parameter space consistent with a strong first order electroweak phase transition (SFOEPT). Read More

We present accurate measurements of the linear, quadratic, and cubic local bias of dark matter halos, using curved "separate universe" N-body simulations which effectively incorporate an infinite-wavelength overdensity. This can be seen as an exact implementation of the peak-background split argument. We compare the results with the linear and quadratic bias measured from the halo-matter power spectrum and bispectrum, and find good agreement. Read More

The Next-to-Minimal Supersymmetric extension of the Standard Model (NMSSM) with a Higgs boson of mass 125 GeV can be compatible with stop masses of order of the electroweak scale, thereby reducing the degree of fine-tuning necessary to achieve electroweak symmetry breaking. Moreover, in an attractive region of the NMSSM parameter space, corresponding to the "alignment limit" in which one of the neutral Higgs fields lies approximately in the same direction in field space as the doublet Higgs vacuum expectation value, the observed Higgs boson is predicted to have Standard-Model-like properties. We derive analytical expressions for the alignment conditions and show that they point toward a more natural region of parameter space for electroweak symmetry breaking, while allowing for perturbativity of the theory up to the Planck scale. Read More

We investigate the shear thinning of red blood cell - dextran suspensions. Microscopic images show that at low polymer concentration, aggregation increases with increasing concentration until it reaches a maximum and then decreases again to non-aggregation. This bell shape dependency is also deduced from the rheological measurements, if the data are correctly normalized by the viscosity of the suspending phase since a significant amount of polymers adsorb to the cell surfaces. Read More

In a recent letter, Carlos Vilchez-Roman criticizes Bornmann et al. (2015) for using data which cannot be reproduced without access to an in-house version of the Web-of-Science (WoS) at the Max Planck Digital Libraries (MPDL, Munich). We agree with the norm of replicability and therefore returned to our data. Read More

We study encodings from CSP into asynchronous CCS with name passing and matching, so in fact, the asynchronous pi-calculus. By doing so, we discuss two different ways to map the multi-way synchronisation mechanism of CSP into the two-way synchronisation mechanism of CCS. Both encodings satisfy the criteria of Gorla except for compositionality, as both use an additional top-level context. Read More

We study encodings from CSP into asynchronous CCS with name passing and matching, so in fact, the asynchronous pi-calculus. By doing so, we discuss two different ways to map the multi-way synchronisation mechanism of CSP into the two-way synchronisation mechanism of CCS. Both encodings satisfy the criteria of Gorla except for compositionality, as both use an additional top-level context. Read More

The minimal supersymmetric standard model leads to precise predictions of the properties of the light Higgs boson degrees of freedom that depend on only a few relevant supersymmetry breaking parameters. In particular, there is an upper bound on the mass of the lightest neutral Higgs boson, which for a supersymmetric spectrum of the order of a TeV is barely above the one of the Higgs resonance recently observed at the LHC. This bound can be raised by considering a heavier supersymmetric spectrum, relaxing the tension between theory and experiment. Read More

Run 1 data of the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) contain excessive events in the same-sign dilepton channel with b-jets and missing transverse energy (MET), which were observed by five separate analyses from ATLAS and CMS collaborations. We show that these events could be explained by direct production of top squarks (stops) in supersymmetry. In particular, a right-handed stop with a mass of 550 GeV decaying into 2 t quarks, 2 W bosons, and MET could fit the observed excess without being constrained by other direct search limits from Run 1. Read More

Droplet formation of suspensions is present in many industrial and technological processes such as coating and food engineering. Whilst the finite time singularity of the minimum neck diameter in capillary break-up of simple liquids can be described by well known self-similarity solutions, the pinching of non-Brownian suspension depends in a complex way on the particle dynamics in the thinning thread. Here we focus on the very dilute regime where the filament contains only isolated beads to identify the physical mechanisms leading to the pronounced acceleration of the filament thinning observed. Read More

We report on the first measurement of the three-point function with the position-dependent correlation function from the SDSS-III Baryon Oscillation Spectroscopic Survey (BOSS) Data Release 10 CMASS sample. This new observable measures the correlation between two-point functions of galaxy pairs within different subvolumes, $\hat{\xi}({\rm r},{\rm r}_L)$, where ${\rm r}_L$ is the location of a subvolume, and the corresponding mean overdensities, $\bar{\delta}({\rm r}_L)$. This correlation, which we call the "integrated three-point function", $i\zeta(r)=\langle\hat{\xi}({\rm r},{\rm r}_L)\bar{\delta}({\rm r}_L)\rangle$, measures a three-point function of two short- and one long-wavelength modes, and is generated by nonlinear gravitational evolution and possibly also by the physics of inflation. Read More

Interactions between atomic and molecular objects are to a large extent defined by the nanoscale electrostatic potentials which these objects produce. We introduce a scanning probe technique that enables three-dimensional imaging of local electrostatic potential fields with sub-nanometer resolution. Registering single electron charging events of a molecular quantum dot attached to the tip of a (qPlus tuning fork) atomic force microscope operated at 5 K, we quantitatively measure the quadrupole field of a single molecule and the dipole field of a single metal adatom, both adsorbed on a clean metal surface. Read More

We study the impurity entanglement entropy $S_e$ in quantum impurity models that feature a Kondo-destruction quantum critical point (QCP) arising from a pseudogap in the conduction-band density of states or from coupling to a bosonic bath. On the local-moment (Kondo-destroyed) side of the QCP, the entanglement entropy contains a critical component that can be related to the order parameter characterizing the quantum phase transition. In Kondo models describing a spin-$\Simp$, $S_e$ assumes its maximal value of $\ln(2\Simp+1)$ at the QCP and throughout the Kondo phase, independent of features such as particle-hole symmetry and under- or over-screening. Read More

We show that in a certain, angle-averaged squeezed limit, the $N$-point function of matter is related to the response of the matter power spectrum to a long-wavelength density perturbation, $P^{-1}d^nP(k|\delta_L)/d\delta_L^n|_{\delta_L=0}$, with $n=N-2$. By performing N-body simulations with a homogeneous overdensity superimposed on a flat Friedmann-Robertson-Lema\^itre-Walker (FRLW) universe using the \emph{separate universe} approach, we obtain measurements of the nonlinear matter power spectrum response up to $n=3$, which is equivalent to measuring the fully nonlinear matter $3-$ to $5-$point function in this squeezed limit. The sub-percent to few percent accuracy of those measurements is unprecedented. Read More

The Higgs sector of the Minimal Supersymmetric Extension of the Standard Model may be described with a two Higgs doublet model with properties that depend on the soft supersymmetry breaking parameters. For instance, flavor independent CP-violating phases associated with the gaugino masses, the squark trilinear mass parameters and the Higgsino mass parameter $\mu$ may lead to sizable CP-violation in the Higgs sector. For these CP-violating effects to affect the properties of the recently observed SM-like Higgs resonance, the non-standard charged and neutral Higgs bosons masses must be of the order of the weak scale, and both $\mu$ as well as the trilinear stop mass parameter $A_t$ must be of the order or larger than the stop mass parameters. Read More

The ability of a nation to participate in the global knowledge economy depends to some extent on its capacities in science and technology. In an effort to assess the capacity of different countries in science and technology, this article updates a classification scheme developed by RAND to measure science and technology capacity for 150 countries of the world. Read More

Wikipedia is a community-created encyclopedia that contains information about notable people from different countries, epochs and disciplines and aims to document the world's knowledge from a neutral point of view. However, the narrow diversity of the Wikipedia editor community has the potential to introduce systemic biases such as gender biases into the content of Wikipedia. In this paper we aim to tackle a sub problem of this larger challenge by presenting and applying a computational method for assessing gender bias on Wikipedia along multiple dimensions. Read More

For many people, Wikipedia represents one of the primary sources of knowledge about foreign cultures. Yet, different Wikipedia language editions offer different descriptions of cultural practices. Unveiling diverging representations of cultures provides an important insight, since they may foster the formation of cross-cultural stereotypes, misunderstandings and potentially even conflict. Read More