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B. Fuks
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Name
B. Fuks
Affiliation
convenors
City
South Brisbane
Country
Australia

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High Energy Physics - Phenomenology (50)
 
High Energy Physics - Experiment (25)
 
High Energy Physics - Theory (1)

Publications Authored By B. Fuks

Models in which dark matter particles communicate with the visible sector through a pseudoscalar mediator are well-motivated both from a theoretical and from a phenomenological standpoint. With direct detection bounds being typically subleading in such scenarios, the main constraints stem either from collider searches for dark matter, or from indirect detection experiments. However, LHC searches for the mediator particles themselves can not only compete with -- or even supersede -- the reach of direct collider dark matter probes, but they can also test scenarios in which traditional monojet searches become irrelevant, especially when the mediator cannot decay on-shell into dark matter particles or its decay is suppressed. Read More

We perform a detailed analysis of dark matter signals of supersymmetric models containing an extra $U(1)^\prime$ gauge group. We investigate scenarios in which either the right sneutrino or the lightest neutralino are phenomenologically acceptable dark matter candidates and we explore the parameter spaces of different supersymmetric realisations featuring an extra $U(1)^\prime$. We impose consistency with low energy observables, with known mass limits for the superpartners and $Z^\prime$ bosons, as well as with Higgs boson signal strengths, and we moreover verify that predictions for the anomalous magnetic moment of the muon agree with the experimental value and require that the dark matter candidate satisfies the observed relic density and direct and indirect dark matter detection constraints. Read More

The Higgs potential consists of an unexplored territory in which the electroweak symmetry breaking is triggered, and it is moreover directly related to the nature of the electroweak phase transition. Measuring the Higgs boson cubic and quartic couplings, or getting equivalently information on the exact shape of the Higgs potential, is therefore an essential task. However, direct measurements beyond the cubic self-interaction of the Higgs boson consist of a huge challenge, even for a future proton-proton collider expected to operate at a center-of-mass energy of 100 TeV. Read More

We investigate Higgs-boson pair production at the LHC when the final state system arises from decays of vector-like quarks coupling to the Higgs boson and the Standard Model quarks. Our phenomenological study includes next-to-leading-order QCD corrections, which are important to guarantee accurate predictions, and focuses on a detailed analysis of a di-Higgs signal in the four $b$-jet channel. Whereas existing Run II CMS and ATLAS analyses are not specifically designed for probing non-resonant, vector-like-quark induced, di-Higgs production, we show that they nevertheless offer some potential for these modes. Read More

Right-handed sneutrinos are natural components of left-right symmetric supersymmetric models where the gauge sector is extended to include right-handed weak interactions. Unlike in other models where right-handed sneutrinos are gauge singlets, here the right sneutrino is part of a doublet and could be a dark matter candidate whose annihilation proceeds via gauge interactions. We investigate this possibility, and find that relic density, low-energy observable and direct supersymmetry search constraints can be satisfied when the lightest supersymmetric particle is a right-handed sneutrino. Read More

The production of high-mass, color-singlet particles in hadron colliders is universally accompanied by initial state QCD radiation that is predominantly soft with respect to the hard process scale $Q$ and/or collinear with respect to the beam axis. At TeV-scale colliders, this is in contrast to top quark and multijet processes, which, by definition, are hard and central. Consequently, vetoing events with jets possessing transverse momenta above $p_T^{\rm Veto}$ in searches for new color-singlet states can efficiently reduce non-singlet backgrounds, thereby increasing experimental sensitivity. Read More

We present an extensive study of the MSSM parameter space allowing for general generation mixing in the squark sector. Employing an MCMC algorithm, we establish the parameter ranges which are allowed with respect to various experimental and theoretical constraints. Based on this analysis, we propose benchmark scenarios for future studies. Read More

We study the phenomenological consequences of several $CP$-violating structures that could arise in the Standard Model effective field theory framework. Focusing on operators involving electroweak gauge and/or Higgs bosons, we derive constraints originating from Run I LHC data. We then study the capabilities of the present and future LHC runs at higher energies to further probe associated CP-violating phenomena and we demonstrate how differential information can play a key role. Read More

2016Oct
Authors: D. de Florian1, C. Grojean2, F. Maltoni3, C. Mariotti4, A. Nikitenko5, M. Pieri6, P. Savard7, M. Schumacher8, R. Tanaka9, R. Aggleton10, M. Ahmad11, B. Allanach12, C. Anastasiou13, W. Astill14, S. Badger15, M. Badziak16, J. Baglio17, E. Bagnaschi18, A. Ballestrero19, A. Banfi20, D. Barducci21, M. Beckingham22, C. Becot23, G. Bélanger24, J. Bellm25, N. Belyaev26, F. U. Bernlochner27, C. Beskidt28, A. Biekötter29, F. Bishara30, W. Bizon31, N. E. Bomark32, M. Bonvini33, S. Borowka34, V. Bortolotto35, S. Boselli36, F. J. Botella37, R. Boughezal38, G. C. Branco39, J. Brehmer40, L. Brenner41, S. Bressler42, I. Brivio43, A. Broggio44, H. Brun45, G. Buchalla46, C. D. Burgard47, A. Calandri48, L. Caminada49, R. Caminal Armadans50, F. Campanario51, J. Campbell52, F. Caola53, C. M. Carloni Calame54, S. Carrazza55, A. Carvalho56, M. Casolino57, O. Cata58, A. Celis59, F. Cerutti60, N. Chanon61, M. Chen62, X. Chen63, B. Chokoufé Nejad64, N. Christensen65, M. Ciuchini66, R. Contino67, T. Corbett68, R. Costa69, D. Curtin70, M. Dall'Osso71, A. David72, S. Dawson73, J. de Blas74, W. de Boer75, P. de Castro Manzano76, C. Degrande77, R. L. Delgado78, F. Demartin79, A. Denner80, B. Di Micco81, R. Di Nardo82, S. Dittmaier83, A. Dobado84, T. Dorigo85, F. A. Dreyer86, M. Dührssen87, C. Duhr88, F. Dulat89, K. Ecker90, K. Ellis91, U. Ellwanger92, C. Englert93, D. Espriu94, A. Falkowski95, L. Fayard96, R. Feger97, G. Ferrera98, A. Ferroglia99, N. Fidanza100, T. Figy101, M. Flechl102, D. Fontes103, S. Forte104, P. Francavilla105, E. Franco106, R. Frederix107, A. Freitas108, F. F. Freitas109, F. Frensch110, S. Frixione111, B. Fuks112, E. Furlan113, S. Gadatsch114, J. Gao115, Y. Gao116, M. V. Garzelli117, T. Gehrmann118, R. Gerosa119, M. Ghezzi120, D. Ghosh121, S. Gieseke122, D. Gillberg123, G. F. Giudice124, E. W. N. Glover125, F. Goertz126, D. Gonçalves127, J. Gonzalez-Fraile128, M. Gorbahn129, S. Gori130, C. A. Gottardo131, M. Gouzevitch132, P. Govoni133, D. Gray134, M. Grazzini135, N. Greiner136, A. Greljo137, J. Grigo138, A. V. Gritsan139, R. Gröber140, S. Guindon141, H. E. Haber142, C. Han143, T. Han144, R. Harlander145, M. A. Harrendorf146, H. B. Hartanto147, C. Hays148, S. Heinemeyer149, G. Heinrich150, M. Herrero151, F. Herzog152, B. Hespel153, V. Hirschi154, S. Hoeche155, S. Honeywell156, S. J. Huber157, C. Hugonie158, J. Huston159, A. Ilnicka160, G. Isidori161, B. Jäger162, M. Jaquier163, S. P. Jones164, A. Juste165, S. Kallweit166, A. Kaluza167, A. Kardos168, A. Karlberg169, Z. Kassabov170, N. Kauer171, D. I. Kazakov172, M. Kerner173, W. Kilian174, F. Kling175, K. Köneke176, R. Kogler177, R. Konoplich178, S. Kortner179, S. Kraml180, C. Krause181, F. Krauss182, M. Krawczyk183, A. Kulesza184, S. Kuttimalai185, R. Lane186, A. Lazopoulos187, G. Lee188, P. Lenzi189, I. M. Lewis190, Y. Li191, S. Liebler192, J. Lindert193, X. Liu194, Z. Liu195, F. J. Llanes-Estrada196, H. E. Logan197, D. Lopez-Val198, I. Low199, G. Luisoni200, P. Maierhöfer201, E. Maina202, B. Mansoulié203, H. Mantler204, M. Mantoani205, A. C. Marini206, V. I. Martinez Outschoorn207, S. Marzani208, D. Marzocca209, A. Massironi210, K. Mawatari211, J. Mazzitelli212, A. McCarn213, B. Mellado214, K. Melnikov215, S. B. Menari216, L. Merlo217, C. Meyer218, P. Milenovic219, K. Mimasu220, S. Mishima221, B. Mistlberger222, S. -O. Moch223, A. Mohammadi224, P. F. Monni225, G. Montagna226, M. Moreno Llácer227, N. Moretti228, S. Moretti229, L. Motyka230, A. Mück231, M. Mühlleitner232, S. Munir233, P. Musella234, P. Nadolsky235, D. Napoletano236, M. Nebot237, C. Neu238, M. Neubert239, R. Nevzorov240, O. Nicrosini241, J. Nielsen242, K. Nikolopoulos243, J. M. No244, C. O'Brien245, T. Ohl246, C. Oleari247, T. Orimoto248, D. Pagani249, C. E. Pandini250, A. Papaefstathiou251, A. S. Papanastasiou252, G. Passarino253, B. D. Pecjak254, M. Pelliccioni255, G. Perez256, L. Perrozzi257, F. Petriello258, G. Petrucciani259, E. Pianori260, F. Piccinini261, M. Pierini262, A. Pilkington263, S. Plätzer264, T. Plehn265, R. Podskubka266, C. T. Potter267, S. Pozzorini268, K. Prokofiev269, A. Pukhov270, I. Puljak271, M. Queitsch-Maitland272, J. Quevillon273, D. Rathlev274, M. Rauch275, E. Re276, M. N. Rebelo277, D. Rebuzzi278, L. Reina279, C. Reuschle280, J. Reuter281, M. Riembau282, F. Riva283, A. Rizzi284, T. Robens285, R. Röntsch286, J. Rojo287, J. C. Romão288, N. Rompotis289, J. Roskes290, R. Roth291, G. P. Salam292, R. Salerno293, M. O. P. Sampaio294, R. Santos295, V. Sanz296, J. J. Sanz-Cillero297, H. Sargsyan298, U. Sarica299, P. Schichtel300, J. Schlenk301, T. Schmidt302, C. Schmitt303, M. Schönherr304, U. Schubert305, M. Schulze306, S. Sekula307, M. Sekulla308, E. Shabalina309, H. S. Shao310, J. Shelton311, C. H. Shepherd-Themistocleous312, S. Y. Shim313, F. Siegert314, A. Signer315, J. P. Silva316, L. Silvestrini317, M. Sjodahl318, P. Slavich319, M. Slawinska320, L. Soffi321, M. Spannowsky322, C. Speckner323, D. M. Sperka324, M. Spira325, O. Stål326, F. Staub327, T. Stebel328, T. Stefaniak329, M. Steinhauser330, I. W. Stewart331, M. J. Strassler332, J. Streicher333, D. M. Strom334, S. Su335, X. Sun336, F. J. Tackmann337, K. Tackmann338, A. M. Teixeira339, R. Teixeira de Lima340, V. Theeuwes341, R. Thorne342, D. Tommasini343, P. Torrielli344, M. Tosi345, F. Tramontano346, Z. Trócsányi347, M. Trott348, I. Tsinikos349, M. Ubiali350, P. Vanlaer351, W. Verkerke352, A. Vicini353, L. Viliani354, E. Vryonidou355, D. Wackeroth356, C. E. M. Wagner357, J. Wang358, S. Wayand359, G. Weiglein360, C. Weiss361, M. Wiesemann362, C. Williams363, J. Winter364, D. Winterbottom365, R. Wolf366, M. Xiao367, L. L. Yang368, R. Yohay369, S. P. Y. Yuen370, G. Zanderighi371, M. Zaro372, D. Zeppenfeld373, R. Ziegler374, T. Zirke375, J. Zupan376
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This Report summarizes the results of the activities of the LHC Higgs Cross Section Working Group in the period 2014-2016. The main goal of the working group was to present the state-of-the-art of Higgs physics at the LHC, integrating all new results that have appeared in the last few years. The first part compiles the most up-to-date predictions of Higgs boson production cross sections and decay branching ratios, parton distribution functions, and off-shell Higgs boson production and interference effects. Read More

Vector-like quarks are featured by a wealth of beyond the Standard Model theories and are consequently an important goal of many LHC searches for new physics. Those searches, as well as most related phenomenological studies, however rely on predictions evaluated at the leading-order accuracy in QCD and consider well-defined simplified benchmark scenarios. Adopting an effective bottom-up approach, we compute next-to-leading-order predictions for vector-like-quark pair-production and single production in association with jets, with a weak or with a Higgs boson in a general new physics setup. Read More

We consider minimal dark matter scenarios featuring momentum-dependent couplings of the dark sector to the Standard Model. We derive constraints from existing LHC searches in the monojet channel, estimate the future LHC sensitivity for an integrated luminosity of 300 fb$^{-1}$, and compare with models exhibiting conventional momentum-independent interactions with the dark sector. In addition to being well motivated by (composite) pseudo-Goldstone dark matter scenarios, momentum-dependent couplings are interesting as they weaken direct detection constraints. Read More

We study the impact of dimension-six operators of the standard model effective field theory relevant for vector-boson fusion and associated Higgs boson production at the LHC. We present predictions at the next-to-leading order accuracy in QCD that include matching to parton showers and that rely on fully automated simulations. We show the importance of the subsequent reduction of the theoretical uncertainties in improving the possible discrimination between effective field theory and standard model results, and we demonstrate that the range of the Wilson coefficient values allowed by a global fit to LEP and LHC Run~I data can be further constrained by LHC Run~II future results. Read More

We study the jet activity that accompanies the production by gluon fusion of a new physics scalar particle decaying into photons at the LHC. In the considered scenarios, both the production and decay mechanisms are governed by loop-induced interactions involving a heavy colored state. We show that the presence of large new physics contributions to the inclusive diphoton invariant-mass spectrum always implies a significant production rate of non-standard diphoton events containing extra hard jets. Read More

Studies of dark matter lie at the interface of collider physics, astrophysics and cosmology. Constraining models featuring dark matter candidates entails the capability to provide accurate predictions for large sets of observables and compare them to a wide spectrum of data. We present a framework which, starting from a model lagrangian, allows one to consistently and systematically make predictions, as well as to confront those predictions with a multitude of experimental results. Read More

We present the activities of the 'New Physics' working group for the 'Physics at TeV Colliders' workshop (Les Houches, France, 1-19 June, 2015). Our report includes new physics studies connected with the Higgs boson and its properties, direct search strategies, reinterpretation of the LHC results in the building of viable models and new computational tool developments. Important signatures for searches for natural new physics at the LHC and new assessments of the interplay between direct dark matter searches and the LHC are also considered. Read More

We study a class of realizations of the Next-to-Minimal Supersymmetric Standard Model that is motivated by dark matter and Higgs data, and in which the lightest pseudoscalar Higgs boson mass is smaller than twice the bottom quark mass and greater than twice the tau lepton mass. In such scenarios, the lightest pseudoscalar Higgs boson can be copiously produced at the LHC from the decay of heavier superpartners and will dominantly further decay into a pair of tau leptons that is generally boosted. We make use of a boosted object tagging technique designed to tag such a ditau jet, and estimate the sensitivity of the LHC to the considered supersymmetric scenarios with 20 to 50~fb$^{-1}$ of proton-proton collisions at a center-of-mass energy of 13~TeV. Read More

We perform a threshold resummation calculation for the associated production of gluinos and gauginos at the LHC to the next-to-leading logarithmic accuracy. Analytical results are presented for the process-dependent soft anomalous dimension and the hard function. The resummed results are matched to a full next-to-leading order calculation, for which we have generalised the previously known results to the case of supersymmetric scenarios featuring non-universal squark masses. Read More

We study constraints from LHC run I on squark and gluino masses in the presence of squark flavor violation. Inspired by the concept of `flavored naturalness', we focus on the impact of a non-zero stop-scharm mixing and mass splitting in the right-handed sector. To this end, we recast four searches of the ATLAS and CMS collaborations, dedicated either to third generation squarks, to gluino and squarks of the first two generations, or to charm-squarks. Read More

We present a phenomenological study of triple-Higgs production in which we estimate the prospects for measuring the form of the Higgs potential at future circular collider projects. We analyze proton-proton collisions at a center-of-mass energy of 100 TeV and focus on two different signatures in which the final state is made of four b-jets and either a pair of photons or a pair of tau leptons. We study the resulting sensitivity on the Higgs cubic and quartic self-interactions and investigate how it depends on the b-tagging, tau-tagging and photon resolution performances of detectors that could be designed for these future machines. Read More

We present an extensive study of non-minimally flavour violating (NMFV) terms in the Lagrangian of the Minimal Supersymmetric Standard Model (MSSM). We impose a variety of theoretical and experimental constraints and perform a detailed scan of the parameter space by means of a Markov Chain Monte-Carlo (MCMC) setup. This represents the first study of several non-zero flavour-violating elements within the MSSM. Read More

We present a fully automated framework based on the FeynRules and MadGraph5 aMC@NLO programs that allows for accurate simulations of supersymmetric QCD processes at the LHC. Starting directly from a model Lagrangian that features squark and gluino interactions, event generation is achieved at the next-to-leading order in QCD, matching short-distance events to parton showers and including the subsequent decay of the produced supersymmetric particles. As an application, we study the impact of higher-order corrections in gluino pair-production in a simplified benchmark scenario inspired by current gluino LHC searches. Read More

We present an extensive study of non-minimal flavour violation in the squark sector in the framework of the Minimal Supersymmetric Standard Model. We investigate the effects of multiple non-vanishing flavour-violating elements in the squark mass matrices by means of a Markov Chain Monte Carlo scanning technique and identify parameter combinations that are favoured by both current data and theoretical constraints. We then detail the resulting distributions of the flavour-conserving and flavour-violating model parameters. Read More

We introduce Rosetta, a program allowing for the translation between different bases of effective field theory operators. We present the main functions of the program and provide an example of usage. One of the Lagrangians which Rosetta can translate into has been implemented into FeynRules, which allows Rosetta to be interfaced into various high-energy physics programs such as Monte Carlo event generators. Read More

2015Jul
Authors: Daniel Abercrombie, Nural Akchurin, Ece Akilli, Juan Alcaraz Maestre, Brandon Allen, Barbara Alvarez Gonzalez, Jeremy Andrea, Alexandre Arbey, Georges Azuelos, Patrizia Azzi, Mihailo Backović, Yang Bai, Swagato Banerjee, James Beacham, Alexander Belyaev, Antonio Boveia, Amelia Jean Brennan, Oliver Buchmueller, Matthew R. Buckley, Giorgio Busoni, Michael Buttignol, Giacomo Cacciapaglia, Regina Caputo, Linda Carpenter, Nuno Filipe Castro, Guillelmo Gomez Ceballos, Yangyang Cheng, John Paul Chou, Arely Cortes Gonzalez, Chris Cowden, Francesco D'Eramo, Annapaola De Cosa, Michele De Gruttola, Albert De Roeck, Andrea De Simone, Aldo Deandrea, Zeynep Demiragli, Anthony DiFranzo, Caterina Doglioni, Tristan du Pree, Robin Erbacher, Johannes Erdmann, Cora Fischer, Henning Flaecher, Patrick J. Fox, Benjamin Fuks, Marie-Helene Genest, Bhawna Gomber, Andreas Goudelis, Johanna Gramling, John Gunion, Kristian Hahn, Ulrich Haisch, Roni Harnik, Philip C. Harris, Kerstin Hoepfner, Siew Yan Hoh, Dylan George Hsu, Shih-Chieh Hsu, Yutaro Iiyama, Valerio Ippolito, Thomas Jacques, Xiangyang Ju, Felix Kahlhoefer, Alexis Kalogeropoulos, Laser Seymour Kaplan, Lashkar Kashif, Valentin V. Khoze, Raman Khurana, Khristian Kotov, Dmytro Kovalskyi, Suchita Kulkarni, Shuichi Kunori, Viktor Kutzner, Hyun Min Lee, Sung-Won Lee, Seng Pei Liew, Tongyan Lin, Steven Lowette, Romain Madar, Sarah Malik, Fabio Maltoni, Mario Martinez Perez, Olivier Mattelaer, Kentarou Mawatari, Christopher McCabe, Théo Megy, Enrico Morgante, Stephen Mrenna, Siddharth M. Narayanan, Andy Nelson, Sérgio F. Novaes, Klaas Ole Padeken, Priscilla Pani, Michele Papucci, Manfred Paulini, Christoph Paus, Jacopo Pazzini, Björn Penning, Michael E. Peskin, Deborah Pinna, Massimiliano Procura, Shamona F. Qazi, Davide Racco, Emanuele Re, Antonio Riotto, Thomas G. Rizzo, Rainer Roehrig, David Salek, Arturo Sanchez Pineda, Subir Sarkar, Alexander Schmidt, Steven Randolph Schramm, William Shepherd, Gurpreet Singh, Livia Soffi, Norraphat Srimanobhas, Kevin Sung, Tim M. P. Tait, Timothee Theveneaux-Pelzer, Marc Thomas, Mia Tosi, Daniele Trocino, Sonaina Undleeb, Alessandro Vichi, Fuquan Wang, Lian-Tao Wang, Ren-Jie Wang, Nikola Whallon, Steven Worm, Mengqing Wu, Sau Lan Wu, Hongtao Yang, Yong Yang, Shin-Shan Yu, Bryan Zaldivar, Marco Zanetti, Zhiqing Zhang, Alberto Zucchetta

This document is the final report of the ATLAS-CMS Dark Matter Forum, a forum organized by the ATLAS and CMS collaborations with the participation of experts on theories of Dark Matter, to select a minimal basis set of dark matter simplified models that should support the design of the early LHC Run-2 searches. A prioritized, compact set of benchmark models is proposed, accompanied by studies of the parameter space of these models and a repository of generator implementations. This report also addresses how to apply the Effective Field Theory formalism for collider searches and present the results of such interpretations. Read More

We present an analysis of supersymmetric left-right symmetric models with Higgs fields lying in the adjoint representation of $SU(2)_R$. These models feature a doubly-charged Higgs boson which gets its mass only at the loop level. We present, for the first time, a complete one-loop calculation of this mass and show that contributions that have been neglected so far can shift it by a few hundreds of GeV. Read More

Many theories beyond the Standard Model predict the existence of colored scalar states, known as sgluons, lying in the adjoint representation of the QCD gauge group. In scenarios where they are top-philic, sgluons are expected to be copiously pair-produced at the LHC via strong interactions with decays into pairs of top quarks or gluons. Consequently, sgluons can be sought in multijet and multitop events at the LHC. Read More

We investigate existing and future hadron-collider constraints on the top dipole chromomagnetic and chromoelectric moments, two quantities that are expected to be modified in the presence of new physics. We focus first on recent measurements of the inclusive top pair production cross section at the Tevatron and at the Large Hadron Collider. We then analyse the role of top-antitop events produced at very large invariant masses, in the context of the forthcoming 13-14 TeV runs of the LHC, and at a future 100 TeV proton-proton collider. Read More

We present for the first time the full automation of collider predictions matched with parton showers at the next-to-leading accuracy in QCD within non-trivial extensions of the Standard Model. The sole inputs required from the user are the model Lagrangian and the process of interest. As an application of the above, we explore scenarios beyond the Standard Model where new colored scalar particles can be pair produced in hadron collisions. Read More

We describe various studies relevant for top physics at future circular collider projects currently under discussion. We show how highly-massive top-antitop systems produced in proton-proton collisions at a center-of-mass energy of 100 TeV could be observed and employed for constraining top dipole moments, investigate the reach of future proton-proton and electron-positron machines to top flavor-changing neutral interactions, and discuss top parton densities. Read More

We present MadAnalysis 5, an analysis package dedicated to phenomenological studies of simulated collisions occurring in high-energy physics experiments. Within this framework, users are invited, through a user-friendly Python interpreter, to implement physics analyses in a very simple manner. A C++ code is then automatically generated, compiled and executed. Read More

We investigate the sensitivity of the Large Hadron Collider to supersymmetric setups using monotop probes in which the signal is a single top quark produced in association with missing transverse energy. Our prospective study relies on Monte Carlo simulations of 300 invfb of proton- proton collisions at a centre-of-mass energy of 14 TeV and considers both leptonic and hadronic monotop decays. We present analysis strategies sensitive to regions of the supersymmetric parameter space which feature small superparticle mass splittings and illustrate their strengths in the context of a particular set of benchmark scenarios. Read More

The search for electroweak superpartners has recently moved to the centre of interest at the LHC. We provide the currently most precise theoretical predictions for these particles, use them to assess the precision of parton shower simulations, and reanalyse public experimental results assuming more general decompositions of gauginos and sleptons. Read More

Scenarios of new physics where a single top quark can be produced in association with large missing energy (monotop) have been recently studied both from the theoretical point of view and by experimental collaborations. We revisit the originally proposed monotop setup by embedding the effective couplings of the top quark in an SU(2)L invariant formalism. We show that minimality selects one model for each of the possible production mechanisms: a scalar field coupling to a right-handed top quark and an invisible fermion when the monotop system is resonantly produced, and a vector field mediating the interactions of a dark sector to right-handed quarks for the non-resonant production mode. Read More

We present the implementation, in the MadAnalysis 5 framework, of several ATLAS and CMS searches for supersymmetry in data recorded during the first run of the LHC. We provide extensive details on the validation of our implementations and propose to create a public analysis database within this framework. Read More

We present an extension of the expert mode of the MadAnalysis 5 program dedicated to the design or reinterpretation of high-energy physics collider analyses. We detail the predefined classes, functions and methods available to the user and emphasize the most recent developments. The latter include the possible definition of multiple sub-analyses and a novel user-friendly treatment for the selection criteria. Read More

We present the activities of the "New Physics" working group for the "Physics at TeV Colliders" workshop (Les Houches, France, 3--21 June, 2013). Our report includes new computational tool developments, studies of the implications of the Higgs boson discovery on new physics, important signatures for searches for natural new physics at the LHC, new studies of flavour aspects of new physics, and assessments of the interplay between direct dark matter searches and the LHC. Read More

2014May
Affiliations: 1conveners, 2conveners, 3conveners, 4conveners, 5conveners, 6conveners, 7conveners, 8conveners, 9conveners, 10conveners, 11conveners, 12conveners, 13conveners, 14conveners, 15conveners, 16conveners, 17conveners, 18conveners, 19conveners, 20conveners, 21conveners, 22conveners, 23conveners, 24conveners, 25conveners, 26conveners, 27conveners, 28conveners, 29conveners, 30conveners, 31conveners, 32conveners, 33conveners, 34conveners, 35conveners, 36conveners, 37conveners, 38conveners, 39conveners, 40conveners, 41conveners, 42conveners, 43conveners, 44conveners, 45conveners, 46conveners, 47conveners, 48conveners, 49conveners, 50conveners, 51conveners, 52conveners, 53conveners, 54conveners, 55conveners, 56conveners, 57conveners, 58conveners, 59conveners, 60conveners, 61conveners, 62conveners, 63conveners, 64conveners, 65conveners, 66conveners, 67conveners, 68conveners, 69conveners, 70conveners, 71conveners, 72conveners, 73conveners, 74conveners, 75conveners, 76conveners, 77conveners, 78conveners, 79conveners, 80conveners

This Report summarizes the proceedings of the 2013 Les Houches workshop on Physics at TeV Colliders. Session 1 dealt primarily with (1) the techniques for calculating standard model multi-leg NLO and NNLO QCD and NLO EW cross sections and (2) the comparison of those cross sections with LHC data from Run 1, and projections for future measurements in Run 2. Read More

The TeV energy region is currently being explored by both the ATLAS and CMS experiments of the Large Hadron Collider and phenomena beyond the Standard Model are extensively searched for. Large fractions of the parameter space of many models have already been excluded, and the ranges covered by the searches will certainly be increased by the upcoming energy and luminosity upgrades. If new physics has to be discovered in the forthcoming years, the ultimate goal of the high-energy physics program will consist of fully characterizing the newly-discovered degrees of freedom in terms of properties such as their masses, spins and couplings. Read More

We present new features of the FeynRules and MadGraph5/aMC@NLO programs for the automatic computation of decay widths that consistently include channels of arbitrary final-state multiplicity. The implementations are generic enough so that they can be used in the framework of any quantum field theory, possibly including higher-dimensional operators. We extend at the same time the conventions of the Universal FeynRules Output (or UFO) format to include decay tables and information on the total widths. Read More

We review, in the first part of this work, many pioneering works on supersymmetry and organize these results to show how supersymmetric quantum field theories arise from spin-statistics, N{\oe}ther and a series of no-go theorems. We then introduce the so-called superspace formalism dedicated to the natural construction of supersymmetric Lagrangians and detail the most popular mechanisms leading to soft supersymmetry breaking. As an application, we describe the building of the Minimal Supersymmetric Standard Model and investigate current experimental limits on the parameter space of its most constrained versions. Read More

We investigate new physics scenarios where systems comprised of a single top quark accompanied by missing transverse energy, dubbed monotops, can be produced at the LHC. Following a simplified model approach, we describe all possible monotop production modes via an effective theory and estimate the sensitivity of the LHC, assuming 20 fb$^{-1}$ of collisions at a center-of-mass energy of 8 TeV, to the observation of a monotop state. Considering both leptonic and hadronic top quark decays, we show that large fractions of the parameter space are reachable and that new physics particles with masses ranging up to 1. Read More

The Higgs discovery and the lack of any other hint for new physics favor a description of non-standard Higgs physics in terms of an effective field theory. We present an implementation of a general Higgs effective Lagrangian containing operators up to dimension six in the framework of FeynRules and provide details on the translation between the mass and interaction bases, in particular for three- and four-point interaction vertices involving Higgs and gauge bosons. We illustrate the strengths of this implementation by using the UFO interface of FeynRules capable to generate model files that can be understood by the MadGraph 5 event generator and that have the specificity to contain all interaction vertices, without any restriction on the number of external legs or on the complexity of the Lorentz structures. Read More

Motivated by the shift in experimental attention towards electroweak supersymmetric particle production at the CERN LHC, we update in this paper our precision predictions at next-to-leading order of perturbative QCD matched to resummation at the next-to-leading logarithmic accuracy for direct slepton pair production in proton-proton collisions. Simplified models, now commonly adopted by the experimental collaborations for selectrons and smuons as well as mixing staus, are used as benchmarks for total cross sections at achieved and future center-of-mass energies. They are presented together with the corresponding scale and parton density uncertainties in graphical and tabular form for future reference. Read More

FeynRules is a Mathematica-based package which addresses the implementation of particle physics models, which are given in the form of a list of fields, parameters and a Lagrangian, into high-energy physics tools. It calculates the underlying Feynman rules and outputs them to a form appropriate for various programs such as CalcHEP, FeynArts, MadGraph, Sherpa and Whizard. Since the original version, many new features have been added: support for two-component fermions, spin-3/2 and spin-2 fields, superspace notation and calculations, automatic mass diagonalization, completely general FeynArts output, a new universal FeynRules output interface, a new Whizard interface, automatic 1 to 2 decay width calculation, improved speed and efficiency, new guidelines for validation and a new web-based validation package. Read More

The program FeynRules is a Mathematica package developed to facilitate the implementation of new physics theories into high-energy physics tools. Starting from a minimal set of information such as the model gauge symmetries, its particle content, parameters and Lagrangian, FeynRules provides all necessary routines to extract automatically from the Lagrangian (that can also be computed semi-automatically for supersymmetric theories) the associated Feynman rules. These can be further exported to several Monte Carlo event generators through dedicated interfaces, as well as translated into a Python library, under the so-called UFO model format, agnostic of the model complexity, especially in terms of Lorentz and/or color structures appearing in the vertices or of number of external legs. Read More

MadAnalysis 5 is a new Python/C++ package facilitating phenomenological analyses that can be performed in the framework of Monte Carlo simulations of collisions to be produced in high-energy physics experiments. It allows, by means of a user-friendly interpreter, to perform professional physics analyses in a very simple way. Starting from event samples as generated by any Monte Carlo event generator, large classes of selections can be implemented through intuitive commands, many standard kinematical distributions can be automatically represented by histograms and all results are eventually gathered into detailed Html and latex reports. Read More

We investigate multilepton LHC signals arising from electroweak processes involving sleptons. We consider the framework of general gauge mediated supersymmetry breaking, focusing on models where the low mass region of the superpartner spectrum consists of the three generations of charged sleptons and the nearly massless gravitino. We demonstrate how such models can provide an explanation for the anomalous four lepton events recently observed by the CMS collaboration, while satisfying other existing experimental constraints. Read More

Support for interactions of spin-3/2 particles is implemented in the FeynRules and ALOHA packages and tested with the MadGraph 5 and CalcHEP event generators in the context of three phenomenological applications. In the first, we implement a spin-3/2 Majorana gravitino field, as in local supersymmetric models, and study gravitino and gluino pair-production. In the second, a spin-3/2 Dirac top-quark excitation, inspired from compositness models, is implemented. Read More

We present a complete and extensive analysis of associated chargino and neutralino production in the framework of a supersymmetric theory augmented by left-right symmetry. This model provides additional gaugino and higgsino states in both the neutral and charged sectors, thus potentially enhancing new physics signals at the LHC. For a choice of benchmark scenarios, we calculate cross sections for 7, 8 and 14 TeV. Read More