Amy Mioduszewski - NRAO Socorro

Amy Mioduszewski
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Name
Amy Mioduszewski
Affiliation
NRAO Socorro
City
Socorro
Country
United States

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Solar and Stellar Astrophysics (26)
 
Astrophysics (17)
 
High Energy Astrophysical Phenomena (14)
 
Astrophysics of Galaxies (13)

Publications Authored By Amy Mioduszewski

It has recently been discovered that some, if not all, classical novae emit GeV gamma-rays during outburst, but the mechanics of this gamma-ray emission are still not well understood. We present here a comprehensive, multi-wavelength dataset---from radio to X-rays---for the most gamma-ray luminous classical nova to-date, V1324 Sco. Using this dataset, we show that V1324 Sco is a canonical dusty Fe-II type nova, with a bulk ejecta velocity of $1150 \pm 40~\rm km~s^{-1}$ and an ejecta mass of $2. Read More

Observational constraints of relativistic jets from black holes has largely come from the most powerful and extended jets\cite{Jorstad05,Asada14}, leaving the nature of the low luminosity jets a mystery\cite{Falcke04}. M81* is one of the nearest low-luminosity jets, which underwent an extremely large radio flare in 2011, allowing us to study compact core emission with unprecedented sensitivity and linear resolution. Utilizing a multi-wavelength campaign, we were able to track the flare as it re-brightened and became optically thick. Read More

We present the first results of the Gould's Belt Distances Survey (GOBELINS), a project aimed at measuring the proper motion and trigonometric parallax of a large sample of young stars in nearby regions using multi-epoch Very Long Baseline Array (VLBA) radio observations. Enough VLBA detections have now been obtained for 16 stellar systems in Ophiuchus to derive their parallax and proper motion. This leads to distance determinations for individual stars with an accuracy of 0. Read More

Using multi-epoch VLA observations, covering a time baseline of 29.1 years, we have measured the proper motions of 88 young stars with compact radio emission in the core of the Orion Nebula Cluster (ONC) and the neighboring BN/KL region. Our work increases the number of young stars with measured proper motion at radio frequencies by a factor of 2. Read More

We report on new distances and proper motions to seven stars across the Serpens/Aquila complex. The observations were obtained as part of the Gould's Belt Distances Survey (GOBELINS) project between September 2013 and April 2016 with the Very Long Baseline Array (VLBA). One of our targets is the proto-Herbig AeBe object EC 95, which is a binary system embedded in the Serpens Core. Read More

We present the results of the Gould's Belt Distances Survey (GOBELINS) of young star forming regions towards the Orion Molecular Cloud Complex. We detected 36 YSOs with the Very Large Baseline Array (VLBA), 27 of which have been observed in at least 3 epochs over the course of 2 years. At least half of these YSOs belong to multiple systems. Read More

We present a series of sixteen Very Long Baseline Array (VLBA) high angular resolution observations of a cluster of suspected low-mass young stars in the Monoceros R2 region. Four compact and highly variable radio sources are detected; three of them in only one epoch, the fourth one a total of seven times. This latter source is seen in the direction to the previously known \UCHII\ region VLA~1, and has radio properties that resemble those of magnetically active stars; we shall call it VLA~1$^\star$. Read More

We present new high-resolution, multi-epoch, VLBA radio images of the Galactic microquasar SS 433. We are able to observe plasma knots in the milliarcsecond-scale jets more than 50 days after their launch. This unprecedented baseline in time allows us to determine the bulk launch speed of the radio-emitting plasma during a radio flare, using a new method which we present here, and which is completely independent of optical spectroscopy. Read More

We present multi-epoch, large-scale ($\sim$ 2000 arcmin${}^2$), fairly deep ($\sim$ 16 $\mu$Jy), high-resolution ($\sim$ 1") radio observations of the Perseus star-forming complex obtained with the Karl G. Jansky Very Large Array at frequencies of 4.5 GHz and 7. Read More

Since the Fermi discovery of $\gamma$-rays from novae, one of the biggest questions in the field has been how novae generate such high-energy emission. Shocks must be a fundamental ingredient. Six months of radio observations of the 2012 nova V5589 Sgr with the VLA and 15 weeks of X-ray observations with Swift/XRT show that the radio emission consisted of: 1) a shock-powered, non-thermal flare; and 2) weak thermal emission from $10^{-5}$ M$_\odot$ of freely expanding, photoionized ejecta. Read More

The importance of shocks in nova explosions has been highlighted by Fermi's discovery of \gamma-ray producing novae. Over three years of multi-band VLA radio observations of the 2010 nova V1723 Aql show that shocks between fast and slow flows within the ejecta led to the acceleration of particles and the production of synchrotron radiation. Soon after the start of the eruption, shocks in the ejecta produced an unexpected radio flare, resulting in a multi-peaked radio light curve. Read More

We present deep ($\sim 17~\mu$Jy) radio continuum observations of the Serpens molecular cloud, the Serpens south cluster, and the W40 region obtained using the Very Large Array in its A configuration. We detect a total of 146 sources, 29 of which are young stellar objects (YSOs), 2 are BV stars and 5 more are associated with phenomena related to YSOs. Based on their radio variability and spectral index, we propose that about 16 of the remaining 110 unclassified sources are also YSOs. Read More

2014Dec
Affiliations: 1CRyA-UNAM, 2University of Hertfordshire, 3Leeds University, 4JIVE/Sterrewacht Leiden, 5University of Tasmania, 6MPIfR Bonn, 7University of Vienna, 8ESA-ESTEC Noordwijk, 9CRyA-UNAM, 10NRAO Socorro, 11U. Guadalajara, 12MPIfR Bonn, 13CRyA-UNAM, 14SKA Organisation, 15SKA Organisation

Very Long Baseline Interferometry (VLBI) at radio wavelengths can provide astrometry accurate to 10 micro-arcseconds or better (i.e. better than the target GAIA accuracy) without being limited by dust obscuration. Read More

Accreting black holes are observed to launch relativistic, collimated jets of matter and radiation. In some sources, discrete ejections have been detected with highly relativistic velocities. These particular sources typically have very high mass accretion rates, while sources lower knot velocities are predominantly associated with black holes with relatively low mass accretion rates. Read More

Classical novae are the most common astrophysical thermonuclear explosions, occurring on the surfaces of white dwarf stars accreting gas from companions in binary star systems. Novae typically expel ~10^(-4) solar masses of material at velocities exceeding 1,000 kilometres per second. However, the mechanism of mass ejection in novae is poorly understood, and could be dominated by the impulsive flash of thermonuclear energy, prolonged optically thick winds, or binary interaction with the nova envelope. Read More

Because of its proximity and its youth, the Pleiades open cluster of stars has been extensively studied and serves as a cornerstone for our understanding of the physical properties of young stars. This role is called into question by the "Pleiades distance controversy" wherein the cluster distance of 120.2+/-1. Read More

We present results from a high-sensitivity (60 $\mu$Jy), large-scale (2.26 square degree) survey obtained with the Karl G. Jansky Very Large Array as part of the Gould's Belt Survey program. Read More

The recurrent nova T Pyx underwent its sixth historical outburst in 2011, and became the subject of an intensive multi-wavelength observational campaign. We analyze data from the Swift and Suzaku satellites to produce a detailed X-ray light curve augmented by epochs of spectral information. X-ray observations yield mostly non-detections in the first four months of outburst, but both a super-soft and hard X-ray component rise rapidly after Day 115. Read More

2013Jul
Affiliations: 1MIT Kavli Institute, 2MIT Kavli Institute, 3Valparaiso U, 4NRAO, 5NRAO, 6MIT Kavli Institute, 7MIT Kavli Institute, 8U. Wisconsin, Madison

We present observations of the SS 433 jets using the Chandra High Energy Transmission Grating Spectrometer with contemporaneous optical and VLBA observations. The X-ray and optical emission line regions are found to be related but not coincident as the optical line emission persists for days while the X-ray emission lines fade in less than 5000 s. The line Doppler shifts from the optical and X-ray lines match well, indicating that they are less than 3e14 cm apart. Read More

We present large-scale ($\sim$ 2000 square arcminutes), deep ($\sim$ 20 $\mu$Jy), high-resolution ($\sim$ 1$''$) radio observations of the Ophiuchus star-forming complex obtained with the Karl G.\ Jansky Very Large Array at $\lambda$ = 4 and 6 cm. In total, 189 sources were detected, 56 of them associated with known young stellar sources, and 4 with known extragalactic objects; the other 129 remain unclassified, but most of them are most probably background quasars. Read More

The radio light curves of novae rise and fall over the course of months to years, allowing for detailed observations of the evolution of the nova shell. However, the main parameter determined by radio models of nova explosions - the mass of the ejecta - often seems to exceed theoretical expectations by an order of magnitude. With the recent technological improvements on the Karl G. Read More

Novae, which are the sudden visual brightening triggered by runaway thermonuclear burning on the surface of an accreting white dwarf, are fairly common and bright events. Despite their astronomical significance as nearby laboratories for the study of nuclear burning and accretion phenomena, many aspects of these common stellar explosions are observationally not well-constrained and remain poorly understood. Radio observations, modeling and interpretation can potentially play a crucial role in addressing some of these puzzling issues. Read More

We present multi--epoch VLBA observations of the compact wind collision region in the Cyg OB2 #5 system. These observation confirm the arc-shaped morphology of the emission reported earlier. The total flux as a function of time is roughly constant when the source is "on", but falls below the detection limit as the wind collision region approaches periastron in its orbit around the contact binary at the center of the system. Read More

Despite being the prototype of its class, T Pyx is arguably the most unusual and poorly understood recurrent nova. Here, we use radio observations from the Karl G. Jansky Very Large Array to trace the evolution of the ejecta over the course of the 2011 outburst of T Pyx. Read More

We present multi-frequency radio observations of the 2010 nova event in the symbiotic binary V407 Cygni, obtained with the Karl G. Jansky Very Large Array and spanning 1-45 GHz and 17-770 days following discovery. This nova---the first ever detected in gamma rays---shows a radio light curve dominated by the wind of the Mira giant companion, rather than the nova ejecta themselves. Read More

We present radio light curves and spectra of the classical nova V1723 Aql obtained with the Expanded Very Large Array (EVLA). This is the first paper to showcase results from the EVLA Nova Project, which comprises a team of observers and theorists utilizing the greatly enhanced sensitivity and frequency coverage of EVLA radio observations, along with observations at other wavelengths, to reach a deeper understanding of the energetics, morphology, and temporal characteristics of nova explosions. Our observations of V1723 Aql span 1-37 GHz in frequency, and we report on data from 14-175 days following the time of the nova explosion. Read More

The radio emission from the well-studied massive stellar system Cyg OB2 #5 is known to fluctuate with a period of 6.7 years between a low-flux state when the emission is entirely of free-free origin, and a high-flux state when an additional non-thermal component (of hitherto unknown nature) appears. In this paper, we demonstrate that the radio flux of that non-thermal component is steady on timescales of hours, and that its morphology is arc-like. Read More

Using the Very Long Baseline Array (VLBA), we have observed the radio continuum emission from the young stellar object HW 9 in the Cepheus A star-forming region at ten epochs between 2007 February and 2009 November. Due to its strong radio variability, the source was detected at only four of the ten epochs. From these observations, the trigonometric parallax of HW 9 was determined to be $\pi$ = 1. Read More

Cyg OB2 #5 is a contact binary system with variable radio continuum emission. This emission has a low-flux state where it is dominated by thermal emission from the ionized stellar wind and a high-flux state where an additional non-thermal component appears. The variations are now known to have a period of 6. Read More

Using the Very Long Base Array, we observed the young stellar object EC 95 in the Serpens cloud core at eight epochs from December 2007 to December 2009. Two sources are detected in our field, and are shown to form a tight binary system. The primary (EC 95a) is a 4--5 $M_\odot$ proto-Herbig AeBe object (arguably the youngest such object known), whereas the secondary (EC 95b) is most likely a low-mass T Tauri star. Read More

Using multi-epoch Very Long Baseline Array observations, we have measured the trigonometric parallax of the weak-line T Tauri star HP Tau/G2 in Taurus. The best fit yields a distance of 161.2 $\pm$ 0. Read More

Multi-epoch radio-interferometric observations of young stellar objects can be used to measure their displacement over the celestial sphere with a level of accuracy that currently cannot be attained at any other wavelength. In particular, the accuracy achieved using carefully calibrated, phase-referenced observations with Very Long Baseline Interferometers such as NRAO's Very Long Baseline Array is better than 50 micro-arcseconds. This is sufficient to measure the trigonometric parallax and the proper motion of any radio-emitting young star within several hundred parsecs of the Sun with an accuracy better than a few percent. Read More

2008May
Affiliations: 1MIT Kavli Institute, 2MIT Kavli Institute, 3MIT Kavli Institute, 4Univ. Wisconsin, 5Valparaiso Univ, 6NRAO
Category: Astrophysics

We fit Chandra HETGS data obtained for the unusual X-ray binary SS 433. While line strengths and continuum levels hardly change, the jet Doppler shifts show aperiodic variations that probably result from shocks in interactions with the local environment. The X-ray and optical emission line regions are found to be related but not coincident as the optical line emission persists for days while the X-ray emission lines fade in less than 5000 s. Read More

2008Apr

Multi-epoch radio-interferometric observations of young stellar objects can be used to measure their displacement over the celestial sphere with a level of precision that currently cannot be attained at any other wavelength. In particular, the accuracy achieved using carefully calibrated, phase-referenced observations with the Very Long Baseline Array is better than 50 micro-arcseconds. This is sufficient to measure the trigonometric parallax and the proper motion of any radio-emitting young star within several hundred parsecs of the Sun with an accuracy better than a few percents. Read More

Using phase-referenced multi-epoch Very Long Baseline Array observations, we have measured the trigonometric parallax of several young stars in the Taurus and Ophiuchus star-forming regions with unprecedented accuracy. The mean distance to the Taurus complex was found to be about 140 pc, and its depth around 20 pc, comparable to the linear extent of Taurus on the plane of the sky. In Ophiuchus, 4 sources were observed so far. Read More

The non-thermal 3.6 cm radio continuum emission from the young stars S1 and DoAr21 in the core of Ophiuchus, has been observed with the Very Long Baseline Array (VLBA) at 6 and 7 epochs, respectively, between June 2005 and August 2006. The typical separation between successive observations was 2 to 3 months. Read More

2007Nov

We report high-resolution radio imaging of the recurrent nova RS Ophiuchi (RS Oph) during the first month of the 2006 outburst, using the Very Long Baseline Array (VLBA). Observations made on days 20.8 and 26. Read More

The non-thermal 3.6 cm radio continuum emission from the naked T Tauri stars Hubble 4 and HDE 283572 in Taurus has been observed with the Very Long Baseline Array (VLBA) at 6 epochs between September 2004 and December 2005 with a typical separation between successive observations of 3 months. Thanks to the remarkably accurate astrometry delivered by the VLBA, the trajectory described by both stars on the plane of the sky could be traced very precisely, and modeled as the superposition of their trigonometric parallax and uniform proper motion. Read More

In this article, we present the results of a series of twelve 3.6-cm radio continuum observations of T Tau Sb, one of the companions of the famous young stellar object T Tauri. The data were collected roughly every two months between September 2003 and July 2005 with the Very Long Baseline Array (VLBA). Read More

2005Jan

In this Letter, we present a series of seven observations of the compact, non-thermal radio source associated with T Tauri South made with the Very Long Baseline Array over the course of one year. The emission is found to be composed of a compact structure most certainly originating from the magnetosphere of an underlying pre-main sequence star, and a low-brightness extension which may result from reconnection flares at the star-disk interface. The accuracy of the absolute astrometry offered by the VLBA allows very precise determinations of the trigonometric parallax and proper motion of T Tau South. Read More

2004Jul

We present radio imaging observations of the 1998 outburst of the peculiar emission line star CI Cam, taken about 1, 4, 75, 82, 93, 163, and 306 days after the beginning of the 31.64 March 1998 X-ray flare. The first two epochs show a resolved but compact radio source which becomes optically thin at frequencies higher than 5 GHz. Read More

We present calculations of the radio images and light curves from supernovae, based on high-resolution numerical simulations of the hydrodynamics and radiation transfer in a spherically symmetric medium. As a specific example we model the emission from SN1993J. This supernova does not appear to be expanding in a self-similar fashion, and cannot be adequately fitted with the often-used analytic mini-shell model. Read More

Multifrequency observations from the VLA, VLBA and OVRO Millimeter Array of a major radio outburst of Cygnus X-3 in 2001 September are presented, measuring the evolution of the spectrum of the source over three decades in frequency, over a period of six days. Following the peak of the flare, as the intensity declines the high-frequency spectrum at frequency nu steepens from nu^{-0.4} to nu^{-0. Read More

We present unique radio observations of SS433, using MERLIN, the VLBA, and the VLA, which allow us to, for the first time, properly image and derive a meaningful spectral index for the `ruff' of equatorial emission which surrounds SS433's jet. We interpret this smooth ruff as a wind-like outflow from the binary. Read More

Multifrequency VLA and OVRO observations of the radio outburst of Cygnus X-3 in September 2001 are presented, illustrating the evolution of the spectrum of the source over a period of six days. An estimate of the magnetic field in the emitting region is made from the spectral turnover and possible explanations for the spectral evolution are suggested. Read More

2001Sep
Affiliations: 1Oxford, 2NRAO Socorro, 3Jodrell Bank Observatory, 4Oxford, 5NRAO Socorro
Category: Astrophysics

We have imaged the X-ray binary SS433 with unprecedented Fourier-plane coverage at 6cm using simultaneously the VLBA, MERLIN, and the VLA, and also at 20cm with the VLBA. At both wavelengths we have securely detected smooth, low-surface brightness emission having the appearance of a `ruff' or collar attached perpendicularly to the well-studied knotty jets in this system, extending over at least a few hundred AU. We interpret this smooth emission as a wind-like outflow from the binary, and discuss its implications for the present evolutionary stage of this system. Read More

We present calculations of the radio emission from supernovae based on high-resolution simulations of the hydrodynamics and radiation transfer, using simple energy density relations which link the properties of the radiating electrons and the magnetic field to the hydrodynamics. As a specific example we model the emission from SN1993J, which cannot be adequately fitted with the often-used analytic mini-shell model, and present a good fit to the radio evolution at a single frequency. Both free-free absorption and syncrotron self- absorption are needed to fit the light curve at early times and a circumstellar density profile of rho~r^-1. Read More

Very Long Baseline Array images of the X-ray binary, Cygnus X-3, were obtained 2, 4 and 7 days after the peak of a 10 Jy flare on 4 February 1997. The first two images show a curved one-sided jet, the third a scatter-broadened disc, presumably at the position of the core. The jet curvature changes from the first to the second epoch, which strongly suggests a precessing jet. Read More

1996Jun
Affiliations: 1University of Michigan, 2University of Michigan, 3Bowling Green State University
Category: Astrophysics

A series of simulated maps showing the appearance in total intensity of flows computed using a recently developed relativistic hydrodynamic code (Duncan \& Hughes 1994: ApJ, 436, L119) are presented. The radiation transfer calculations were performed by assuming the flow is permeated by a magnetic field and fast particle distribution in energy equipartition, with energy density proportional to the hydrodynamic energy density (i.e. Read More