Adam Jaeger

Adam Jaeger
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Adam Jaeger
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Statistics - Methodology (2)
 
Statistics - Theory (1)
 
Statistics - Computation (1)
 
Mathematics - Statistics (1)

Publications Authored By Adam Jaeger

We propose a new approach that combines multiple non-parametric likelihood-type components to build a data-driven approximation of the true likelihood function. Our approach is built on empirical likelihood, a non-parametric approximation of the likelihood function. We show the asymptotic behaviors of our approach are identical to those seen in empirical likelihood. Read More

Non-parametric methods avoid the problem of having to specify a particular data generating mechanism, but can be computationally intensive, reducing their accessibility for large data problems. Empirical likelihood, a non-parametric approach to the likelihood function, is also limited in application due to the computational demands necessary. We propose a new approach that combines multiple non-parametric likelihood-type components to build a data-driven approximation of the true function. Read More

The asymptotic results pertaining to the distribution of the log likelihood ratio allow for the creation of a confidence region, which is a general extension of the confidence interval. Two and three dimensional regions can be displayed visually in order to describe the plausible region of the parameters of interest simultaneously. While most advanced statistical textbooks on inference discuss these asymptotic confidence regions, there is no exploration of how to numerically compute these regions for graphical purposes. Read More

The likelihood function plays a pivotal role in statistical inference; it is adaptable to a wide range of models and the resultant estimators are known to have good properties. However, these results hinge on correct specification of the data generating mechanism. Many modern problems involve extremely complicated distribution functions, which may be difficult -- if not impossible -- to express explicitly. Read More