A. V. Penacchioni - Sapienza University and ICRA, Rome, Italy

A. V. Penacchioni
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Name
A. V. Penacchioni
Affiliation
Sapienza University and ICRA, Rome, Italy
City
Rome
Country
Italy

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High Energy Astrophysical Phenomena (23)
 
Cosmology and Nongalactic Astrophysics (9)
 
Instrumentation and Methods for Astrophysics (4)
 
Solar and Stellar Astrophysics (1)

Publications Authored By A. V. Penacchioni

Theoretical and observational evidences have been recently gained for a two-fold classification of short bursts: 1) short gamma-ray flashes (S-GRFs), with isotropic energy $E_{iso}<10^{52}$~erg and no black hole (BH) formation, and 2) the authentic short gamma-ray bursts (S-GRBs), with isotropic energy $E_{iso}>10^{52}$~erg evidencing a BH formation in the binary neutron star merging process. The signature for the BH formation consists in the on-set of the high energy ($0.1$--$100$~GeV) emission, coeval to the prompt emission, in all S-GRBs. Read More

The long lasting attempt to identify the nature of X-ray flares, observed by Swift after the prompt emission of some long gamma ray bursts (GRBs), is here addressed within the context of a special subclass of long GRBs with isotropic energy $E_{iso} > 10^{52}$~erg, recently indicated as binary-driven hypernovae (BdHNe). Such BdHNe have as progenitor a tight binary system composed of a carbon-oxygen core (CO$_\mathrm{core}$) and a neutron star (NS) undergoing an induced gravitational collapse (IGC) to a black hole (BH) triggered by the CO$_\mathrm{core}$ explosion as a supernova (SN). Only in the case of such BdHNe, when analysed in the rest frame of the sources, the time of occurrence, the temporal duration, the X-ray luminosity and the total energy of the flares correlate with the $E_{iso}$. Read More

It has previously been discovered that there is a universal power law behavior exhibited by the late X-ray emission (LXRE) of a "golden sample" (GS) of six long energetic GRBs, when observed in the rest-frame of the source. This remarkable feature, independent of the different isotropic energy (E_iso) of each GRB, has been used to estimate the cosmological redshift of some long GRBs. This analysis is extended here to a new class of 161 long GRBs, all with E_iso > 10^52 erg. Read More

In a new classification of merging binary neutron stars (NSs) we separate short gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) in two sub-classes. The ones with $E_{iso}\lesssim10^{52}$ erg coalesce to form a massive NS and are indicated as short gamma-ray flashes (S-GRFs). The hardest, with $E_{iso}\gtrsim10^{52}$ erg, coalesce to form a black hole (BH) and are indicated as genuine short-GRBs (S-GRBs). Read More

We present upper limits in the hard X-ray and gamma-ray bands at the time of the LIGO gravitational-wave event GW 151226 derived from the CALorimetric Electron Telescope (CALET) observation. The main instrument of CALET, CALorimeter (CAL), observes gamma-rays from ~1 GeV up to 10 TeV with a field of view of ~2 sr. The CALET gamma-ray burst monitor (CGBM) views ~3 sr and ~2pi sr of the sky in the 7 keV - 1 MeV and the 40 keV - 20 MeV bands, respectively, by using two different scintillator-based instruments. Read More

We report the results of detailed Monte Carlo simulations of the performance expected both at balloon altitudes and at the probable satellite orbit of a hard X-ray coded-aperture camera being developed for the MIRAX mission. Based on a thorough mass model of the instrument and detailed specifications of the spectra and angular dependence of the various relevant radiation fields at both the stratospheric and orbital environments, we have used the well-known package GEANT4 to simulate the instrumental background of the camera. We also show simulated images of source fields to be observed and calculated the detailed sensitivity of the instrument in both situations. Read More

The protoMIRAX hard X-ray imaging telescope is a balloon-borne experiment developed as a pathfinder for the MIRAX satellite mission. The experiment consists essentially in a coded-aperture hard X-ray (30-200 keV) imager with a square array (13$\times$13) of 2mm-thick planar CZT detectors with a total area of 169 cm$^2$. The total, fully-coded field-of-view is $21^{\circ}\times 21^{\circ}$ and the angular resolution is 1$^{\circ}$43'. Read More

In this work we present the results of imaging simulations performed with the help of the GEANT4 package for the protoMIRAX hard X-ray balloon experiment. The instrumental background was simulated taking into account the various radiation components and their angular dependence, as well as a detailed mass model of the experiment. We modeled the meridian transits of the Crab Nebula and the Galatic Centre region during balloon flights in Brazil ($\sim -23^{\circ}$ of latitude and an altitude of $\sim 40 \thinspace$ km) and introduced the correspondent spectra as inputs to the imaging simulations. Read More

We show the existence of two families of short GRBs, both originating from the merger of binary neutron stars (NSs): family-1 with $E_{iso}<10^{52}$ erg, leading to a massive NS as the merged core, and family-2 with $E_{iso}>10^{52}$ erg, leading to a black hole (BH). Following the identification of the prototype GRB 090227B, we present the details of a new example of family-2 short burst: GRB 140619B. From the spectral analysis of the early $\sim0. Read More

2014Aug
Authors: M. Feroci1, J. W. den Herder2, E. Bozzo3, D. Barret4, S. Brandt5, M. Hernanz6, M. van der Klis7, M. Pohl8, A. Santangelo9, L. Stella10, A. Watts11, J. Wilms12, S. Zane13, M. Ahangarianabhari14, C. Albertus15, M. Alford16, A. Alpar17, D. Altamirano18, L. Alvarez19, L. Amati20, C. Amoros21, N. Andersson22, A. Antonelli23, A. Argan24, R. Artigue25, B. Artigues26, J. -L. Atteia27, P. Azzarello28, P. Bakala29, G. Baldazzi30, S. Balman31, M. Barbera32, C. van Baren33, S. Bhattacharyya34, A. Baykal35, T. Belloni36, F. Bernardini37, G. Bertuccio38, S. Bianchi39, A. Bianchini40, P. Binko41, P. Blay42, F. Bocchino43, P. Bodin44, I. Bombaci45, J. -M. Bonnet Bidaud46, S. Boutloukos47, L. Bradley48, J. Braga49, E. Brown50, N. Bucciantini51, L. Burderi52, M. Burgay53, M. Bursa54, C. Budtz-Jørgensen55, E. Cackett56, F. R. Cadoux57, P. Cais58, G. A. Caliandro59, R. Campana60, S. Campana61, F. Capitanio62, J. Casares63, P. Casella64, A. J. Castro-Tirado65, E. Cavazzuti66, P. Cerda-Duran67, D. Chakrabarty68, F. Château69, J. Chenevez70, J. Coker71, R. Cole72, A. Collura73, R. Cornelisse74, T. Courvoisier75, A. Cros76, A. Cumming77, G. Cusumano78, A. D'Aì79, V. D'Elia80, E. Del Monte81, A. De Luca82, D. De Martino83, J. P. C. Dercksen84, M. De Pasquale85, A. De Rosa86, M. Del Santo87, S. Di Cosimo88, S. Diebold89, T. Di Salvo90, I. Donnarumma91, A. Drago92, M. Durant93, D. Emmanoulopoulos94, M. H. Erkut95, P. Esposito96, Y. Evangelista97, A. Fabian98, M. Falanga99, Y. Favre100, C. Feldman101, V. Ferrari102, C. Ferrigno103, M. Finger104, M. H. Finger105, G. W. Fraser106, M. Frericks107, F. Fuschino108, M. Gabler109, D. K. Galloway110, J. L. Galvez Sanchez111, E. Garcia-Berro112, B. Gendre113, S. Gezari114, A. B. Giles115, M. Gilfanov116, P. Giommi117, G. Giovannini118, M. Giroletti119, E. Gogus120, A. Goldwurm121, K. Goluchová122, D. Götz123, C. Gouiffes124, M. Grassi125, P. Groot126, M. Gschwender127, L. Gualtieri128, C. Guidorzi129, L. Guy130, D. Haas131, P. Haensel132, M. Hailey133, F. Hansen134, D. H. Hartmann135, C. A. Haswell136, K. Hebeler137, A. Heger138, W. Hermsen139, J. Homan140, A. Hornstrup141, R. Hudec142, J. Huovelin143, A. Ingram144, J. J. M. in't Zand145, G. Israel146, K. Iwasawa147, L. Izzo148, H. M. Jacobs149, F. Jetter150, T. Johannsen151, H. M. Jacobs152, P. Jonker153, J. Josè154, P. Kaaret155, G. Kanbach156, V. Karas157, D. Karelin158, D. Kataria159, L. Keek160, T. Kennedy161, D. Klochkov162, W. Kluzniak163, K. Kokkotas164, S. Korpela165, C. Kouveliotou166, I. Kreykenbohm167, L. M. Kuiper168, I. Kuvvetli169, C. Labanti170, D. Lai171, F. K. Lamb172, P. P. Laubert173, F. Lebrun174, D. Lin175, D. Linder176, G. Lodato177, F. Longo178, N. Lund179, T. J. Maccarone180, D. Macera181, S. Maestre182, S. Mahmoodifar183, D. Maier184, P. Malcovati185, I. Mandel186, V. Mangano187, A. Manousakis188, M. Marisaldi189, A. Markowitz190, A. Martindale191, G. Matt192, I. M. McHardy193, A. Melatos194, M. Mendez195, S. Mereghetti196, M. Michalska197, S. Migliari198, R. Mignani199, M. C. Miller200, J. M. Miller201, T. Mineo202, G. Miniutti203, S. Morsink204, C. Motch205, S. Motta206, M. Mouchet207, G. Mouret208, J. Mulačová209, F. Muleri210, T. Muñoz-Darias211, I. Negueruela212, J. Neilsen213, A. J. Norton214, M. Nowak215, P. O'Brien216, P. E. H. Olsen217, M. Orienti218, M. Orio219, M. Orlandini220, P. Orleanski221, J. P. Osborne222, R. Osten223, F. Ozel224, L. Pacciani225, M. Paolillo226, A. Papitto227, J. M. Paredes228, A. Patruno229, B. Paul230, E. Perinati231, A. Pellizzoni232, A. V. Penacchioni233, M. A. Perez234, V. Petracek235, C. Pittori236, J. Pons237, J. Portell238, A. Possenti239, J. Poutanen240, M. Prakash241, P. Le Provost242, D. Psaltis243, D. Rambaud244, P. Ramon245, G. Ramsay246, M. Rapisarda247, A. Rachevski248, I. Rashevskaya249, P. S. Ray250, N. Rea251, S. Reddy252, P. Reig253, M. Reina Aranda254, R. Remillard255, C. Reynolds256, L. Rezzolla257, M. Ribo258, R. de la Rie259, A. Riggio260, A. Rios261, P. Rodríguez- Gil262, J. Rodriguez263, R. Rohlfs264, P. Romano265, E. M. R. Rossi266, A. Rozanska267, A. Rousseau268, F. Ryde269, L. Sabau-Graziati270, G. Sala271, R. Salvaterra272, A. Sanna273, J. Sandberg274, S. Scaringi275, S. Schanne276, J. Schee277, C. Schmid278, S. Shore279, R. Schneider280, A. Schwenk281, A. D. Schwope282, J. -Y. Seyler283, A. Shearer284, A. Smith285, D. M. Smith286, P. J. Smith287, V. Sochora288, P. Soffitta289, P. Soleri290, A. Spencer291, B. Stappers292, A. W. Steiner293, N. Stergioulas294, G. Stratta295, T. E. Strohmayer296, Z. Stuchlik297, S. Suchy298, V. Sulemainov299, T. Takahashi300, F. Tamburini301, T. Tauris302, C. Tenzer303, L. Tolos304, F. Tombesi305, J. Tomsick306, G. Torok307, J. M. Torrejon308, D. F. Torres309, A. Tramacere310, A. Trois311, R. Turolla312, S. Turriziani313, P. Uter314, P. Uttley315, A. Vacchi316, P. Varniere317, S. Vaughan318, S. Vercellone319, V. Vrba320, D. Walton321, S. Watanabe322, R. Wawrzaszek323, N. Webb324, N. Weinberg325, H. Wende326, P. Wheatley327, R. Wijers328, R. Wijnands329, M. Wille330, C. A. Wilson-Hodge331, B. Winter332, K. Wood333, G. Zampa334, N. Zampa335, L. Zampieri336, L. Zdunik337, A. Zdziarski338, B. Zhang339, F. Zwart340, M. Ayre341, T. Boenke342, C. Corral van Damme343, E. Kuulkers344, D. Lumb345
Affiliations: 11,1b, 2SRON, The Netherlands, 3ISDC, Geneve University, Switzerland, 4IRAP, Toulouse, France, 5National Space Institute, Lyngby, Denmark, 6IEEC-CSIC-UPC-UB, Barcelona, Spain, 7Astronomical Institute Anton Pannekoek, University of Amsterdam, The Netherlands, 8DPNC, Geneve University, Switzerland, 9IAAT Tuebingen, Germany, 10INAF-OA Rome, Italy, 11Astronomical Institute Anton Pannekoek, University of Amsterdam, The Netherlands, 12University of Erlangen-Nuremberg, Germany, 13MSSL, Surrey, United Kingdom, 14Politecnico Milano, Italy, 15Universidad de Granada, Spain, 16Washington University, United States, 17Sabanci University, Istanbul, Turkey, 18Astronomical Institute Anton Pannekoek, University of Amsterdam, The Netherlands, 19IEEC-CSIC-UPC-UB, Barcelona, Spain, 20INAF-IASF-Bologna, Italy, 21IRAP, Toulouse, France, 22Faculty of Physical and Applied Sciences, University of Southampton, United Kingdom, 23ASDC, Rome, Italy, 24IAPS-INAF, Rome, Italy, 25IRAP, Toulouse, France, 26IEEC-CSIC-UPC-UB, Barcelona, Spain, 27IRAP, Toulouse, France, 28ISDC, Geneve University, Switzerland, 29Silesian University in Opava, Czech Republic, 30University of Bologna, Italy, 31Middle East Technical University, Ankara, Turkey, 32Dipartimento di Chimica e Fisica, Palermo University, Italy, 33SRON, The Netherlands, 34Tata Institute of Fundamental Research, Mumbai, India, 35Middle East Technical University, Ankara, Turkey, 36INAF-OA Brera, Italy, 37Wayne State University, Detroit, United States, 38Politecnico Milano, Italy, 39University of Rome III, Italy, 40Dept. of Physics and Astronomy University of Padua, Italy, 41ISDC, Geneve University, Switzerland, 42University of Valencia, Spain, 43INAF-OA Padova, Padova, Italy, 44CNES, Toulouse, France, 45University of Pisa, Italy, 46CEA Saclay, DSM/IRFU/SAp, France, 47IAAT Tuebingen, Germany, 48MSSL, Surrey, United Kingdom, 49INPE, São José dos Campos, Brazil, 50Michigan state University, United States, 51Arcetri Observatory, INAF, Firenze, Italy, 52Cagliari University, Italy, 53INAF-OA Cagliari, Italy, 54Astronomical Institute of the Academy of Sciences of the Czech Republic, Czech Republic, 55National Space Institute, Lyngby, Denmark, 56Wayne State University, Detroit, United States, 57DPNC, Geneve University, Switzerland, 58Laboratoire d'Astrophysique de Bordeaux, France, 59IEEC-CSIC-UPC-UB, Barcelona, Spain, 601,1b, 61INAF-OA Brera, Italy, 62IAPS-INAF, Rome, Italy, 63Instituto de Astrofisica de Canarias, Tenerife, Spain, 64INAF-OA Rome, Italy, 65Instituto Astrofisica de Andalucia, Granada, Spain, 66ASDC, Rome, Italy, 67University of Valencia, Spain, 68MIT, Cambridge, United States, 69CEA Saclay, DSM/IRFU/SAp, France, 70National Space Institute, Lyngby, Denmark, 71MSSL, Surrey, United Kingdom, 72MSSL, Surrey, United Kingdom, 73INAF- Osservatorio Astronomico di Palermo, Italy, 74Instituto de Astrofisica de Canarias, Tenerife, Spain, 75ISDC, Geneve University, Switzerland, 76IRAP, Toulouse, France, 77INAF-OA Capodimonte, Napoli, Italy, 78INAF IFC, Palermo, Italy, 79Dipartimento di Chimica e Fisica, Palermo University, Italy, 80ASDC, Rome, Italy, 811,1b, 82INAF-IASF-Milano, Italy, 83INAF-OA Capodimonte, Napoli, Italy, 84SRON, The Netherlands, 85MSSL, Surrey, United Kingdom, 86IAPS-INAF, Rome, Italy, 87IAPS-INAF, Rome, Italy, 88IAPS-INAF, Rome, Italy, 89IAAT Tuebingen, Germany, 90Dipartimento di Chimica e Fisica, Palermo University, Italy, 91IAPS-INAF, Rome, Italy, 92Ferrara University, Ferrara, Italy, 93Department of Medical Biophysics, University of Toronto, Canada, 94School of Physics and Astronomy, University of Southampton, United Kingdom, 95Istanbul Kültür University, Turkey, 96INAF-IASF-Milano, Italy, 971,1b, 98Cambridge University, Cambridge, United Kingdom, 99ISSI Bern, Switzerland, 100DPNC, Geneve University, Switzerland, 101Leicester University, United Kingdom, 102Sapienza University, Rome, Italy, 103ISDC, Geneve University, Switzerland, 104Charles University in Prague, Czech Republic, 105Universities Space Research Association, Huntsville, United States, 106Leicester University, United Kingdom, 107SRON, The Netherlands, 108INAF-IASF-Bologna, Italy, 109University of Valencia, Spain, 110Monash Centre for Astrophysics, School of Physics and School of Mathematical Sciences, Monash University, Australia, 111IEEC-CSIC-UPC-UB, Barcelona, Spain, 112IEEC-CSIC-UPC-UB, Barcelona, Spain, 113ASDC, Rome, Italy, 114University of Maryland, United States, 115University of Tasmania, Australia, 116MPA Garching, Germany, 117ASDC, Rome, Italy, 118INAF-IRA-Bologna, Italy, 119INAF-IRA-Bologna, Italy, 120Sabanci University, Istanbul, Turkey, 121APC, Université Paris Diderot, CEA/Irfu, Observatoire de Paris, France, 122Silesian University in Opava, Czech Republic, 123CEA Saclay, DSM/IRFU/SAp, France, 124CEA Saclay, DSM/IRFU/SAp, France, 125Pavia University, Italy, 126Clemson University, United States, 127IAAT Tuebingen, Germany, 128Sapienza University, Rome, Italy, 129Ferrara University, Ferrara, Italy, 130ISDC, Geneve University, Switzerland, 131SRON, The Netherlands, 132Copernicus Astronomical Center, Warsaw, Poland, 133MSSL, Surrey, United Kingdom, 134National Space Institute, Lyngby, Denmark, 135Clemson University, United States, 136Open University, United Kingdom, 137Institut für Kernphysik, Technische Universität Darmstadt and ExtreMe Matter Institute EMMI, GSI Helmholtzzentrum für Schwerionenforschung GmbH, Germany, 138Monash Centre for Astrophysics, School of Physics and School of Mathematical Sciences, Monash University, Australia, 139SRON, The Netherlands, 140MIT, Cambridge, United States, 141National Space Institute, Lyngby, Denmark, 142Astronomical Institute of the Academy of Sciences of the Czech Republic, Czech Republic, 143University of Helsinki, Finland, 144Astronomical Institute Anton Pannekoek, University of Amsterdam, The Netherlands, 145SRON, The Netherlands, 146INAF-OA Rome, Italy, 147DAM and ICC-UB, Universitat de Barcelona, Spain, 148Sapienza University and ICRA, Rome, Italy, 149SRON, The Netherlands, 150IAAT Tuebingen, Germany, 151Perimeter Institute for Theoretical Physics, Waterloo, Canada, 152SRON, The Netherlands, 153SRON, The Netherlands, 154Technical University of Catalonia, Barcelona, Spain, 155Michigan state University, United States, 156Max-Planck-Institut fuer extraterrestrische Physik, Garching, Germany, 157Astronomical Institute of the Academy of Sciences of the Czech Republic, Czech Republic, 158IEEC-CSIC-UPC-UB, Barcelona, Spain, 159MSSL, Surrey, United Kingdom, 160Michigan state University, United States, 161MSSL, Surrey, United Kingdom, 162IAAT Tuebingen, Germany, 163Copernicus Astronomical Center, Warsaw, Poland, 164IAAT Tuebingen, Germany, 165University of Helsinki, Finland, 166NASA/Marshall Space Flight Center, United States, 167University of Erlangen-Nuremberg, Germany, 168SRON, The Netherlands, 169National Space Institute, Lyngby, Denmark, 170INAF-IASF-Bologna, Italy, 171Cornell University, Ithaca, United States, 172University of Illinois, United States, 173SRON, The Netherlands, 174APC, Université Paris Diderot, CEA/Irfu, Observatoire de Paris, France, 175IRAP, Toulouse, France, 176MSSL, Surrey, United Kingdom, 177Dipartimento di Fisica, Università degli Studi di Milano, Italy, 178University of Trieste, Italy, 179National Space Institute, Lyngby, Denmark, 180Texas Tech. University, United States, 181Politecnico Milano, Italy, 182IRAP, Toulouse, France, 183University of Maryland, United States, 184IAAT Tuebingen, Germany, 185Pavia University, Italy, 186School of Physics and Astronomy, University of Birmingham, United Kingdom, 187The Pennsylvania State University, United States, 188Copernicus Astronomical Center, Warsaw, Poland, 189INAF-IASF-Bologna, Italy, 190University of California, San Diego, United States, 191Leicester University, United Kingdom, 192University of Rome III, Italy, 193School of Physics and Astronomy, University of Southampton, United Kingdom, 194University of Melbourne, Australia, 195Kapteyn Astronomical Institute, University of Groningen, The Netherlands, 196INAF-IASF-Milano, Italy, 197Space Research Centre, Warsaw, Poland, 198DAM and ICC-UB, Universitat de Barcelona, Spain, 199INAF-IASF-Milano, Italy, 200University of Maryland, United States, 201Michigan state University, United States, 202INAF IFC, Palermo, Italy, 203Centro de Astrobiologia, 204University of Alberta, Canada, 205Observatoire Astronomique de Strasbourg, France, 206INAF-OA Brera, Italy, 207Université Paris Diderot France, 208IRAP, Toulouse, France, 209National Space Institute, Lyngby, Denmark, 2101,1b, 211Oxford University, United Kingdom, 212University of Alicante, Spain, 213MIT, Cambridge, United States, 214Open University, United Kingdom, 215MIT, Cambridge, United States, 216Leicester University, United Kingdom, 217National Space Institute, Lyngby, Denmark, 218INAF-IRA-Bologna, Italy, 219INAF-OA Padova, Padova, Italy, 220INAF-IASF-Bologna, Italy, 221Space Research Centre, Warsaw, Poland, 222Leicester University, United Kingdom, 223Space Telescope Institute, United States, 224University of Arizona, United States, 2251,1b, 226Università di Napoli Fedelico II, Italy, 227IEEC-CSIC-UPC-UB, Barcelona, Spain, 228DAM and ICC-UB, Universitat de Barcelona, Spain, 229Leiden Observatory, The Netherlands, 230Raman Research Institute, India, 231IAAT Tuebingen, Germany, 232INAF-OA Cagliari, Italy, 233Sapienza University and ICRA, Rome, Italy, 234Facultad de Ciencias-Trilingüe University of Salamanca, Spain, 235Czech Technical University in Prague, Czech Republic, 236ASDC, Rome, Italy, 237University of Alicante, Spain, 238IEEC-CSIC-UPC-UB, Barcelona, Spain, 239INAF-OA Cagliari, Italy, 240Tuorla Observatory, University of Turku, Finland, 241Ohio University, United States, 242CEA Saclay, DSM/IRFU/SAp, France, 243University of Arizona, United States, 244IRAP, Toulouse, France, 245IRAP, Toulouse, France, 246Armagh Observatory, United Kingdom, 2471,1b, 248INFN, Trieste, Italy, 249INFN, Trieste, Italy, 250NRL, Washington, United States, 251IEEC-CSIC-UPC-UB, Barcelona, Spain, 252Institute for Nuclear Theory, University of Washington, United States, 253Foundation for Research and Technology, Heraklion, Greece, 254National Institute of Aerospace Technology, 255MIT, Cambridge, United States, 256University of Maryland, United States, 257Max Planck Institute for Gravitational Physics, Germany, 258DAM and ICC-UB, Universitat de Barcelona, Spain, 259SRON, The Netherlands, 260INAF-OA Cagliari, Italy, 261University of Surrey, United Kingdom, 262Instituto de Astrofisica de Canarias, Tenerife, Spain, 263CEA Saclay, DSM/IRFU/SAp, France, 264ISDC, Geneve University, Switzerland, 265INAF IFC, Palermo, Italy, 266Leiden Observatory, The Netherlands, 267Copernicus Astronomical Center, Warsaw, Poland, 268MSSL, Surrey, United Kingdom, 269KTH Royal Institute of Technology, Stockholm, Sweden, 270National Institute of Aerospace Technology, 271IEEC-CSIC-UPC-UB, Barcelona, Spain, 272INAF-IASF-Milano, Italy, 273Kapteyn Astronomical Institute, University of Groningen, The Netherlands, 274Jorgen Sandberg Consulting, Denmark, 275Institute for Astronomy K.U. Leuven, Leuven, Belgium, 276CEA Saclay, DSM/IRFU/SAp, France, 277Silesian University in Opava, Czech Republic, 278University of Erlangen-Nuremberg, Germany, 279University of Pisa, Italy, 280INAF-OA Rome, Italy, 281Institut für Kernphysik, Technische Universität Darmstadt and ExtreMe Matter Institute EMMI, GSI Helmholtzzentrum für Schwerionenforschung GmbH, Germany, 282Leibniz-Institut fuer Astrophysik Potsdam, Germany, 283CNES, Toulouse, France, 284National University of Ireland, Ireland, 285MSSL, Surrey, United Kingdom, 286University of California, United States, 287MSSL, Surrey, United Kingdom, 288Astronomical Institute of the Academy of Sciences of the Czech Republic, Czech Republic, 289IAPS-INAF, Rome, Italy, 290Kapteyn Astronomical Institute, University of Groningen, The Netherlands, 291MSSL, Surrey, United Kingdom, 292University of Manchester, United Kingdom, 293Institute for Nuclear Theory, University of Washington, United States, 294Aristotle University of Thessaloniki, Greece, 295ASDC, Rome, Italy, 296Goddard Space Flight Center, Greenbelt, United States, 297Silesian University in Opava, Czech Republic, 298IAAT Tuebingen, Germany, 299IAAT Tuebingen, Germany, 300ISAS, Kanagawa, Japan, 301Dept. of Physics and Astronomy University of Padua, Italy, 302Argelander-Institut für Astronomie, Bonn, Germany, 303IAAT Tuebingen, Germany, 304IEEC-CSIC-UPC-UB, Barcelona, Spain, 305University of Maryland, United States, 306University of California, Berkeley, Space Sciences Laboratory, United States, 307Silesian University in Opava, Czech Republic, 308University of Alicante, Spain, 309ICREA, Barcelona, Spain, 310ISDC, Geneve University, Switzerland, 311IAPS-INAF, Rome, Italy, 312Dept. of Physics and Astronomy University of Padua, Italy, 313University of Rome Tor Vergata, Italy, 314IAAT Tuebingen, Germany, 315Astronomical Institute Anton Pannekoek, University of Amsterdam, The Netherlands, 316INFN, Trieste, Italy, 317APC, Université Paris Diderot, CEA/Irfu, Observatoire de Paris, France, 318Leicester University, United Kingdom, 319INAF IFC, Palermo, Italy, 320Physical Institute of the Academy of Sciences of the Czech Republic, Czech Republic, 321MSSL, Surrey, United Kingdom, 322ISAS, Kanagawa, Japan, 323Space Research Centre, Warsaw, Poland, 324IRAP, Toulouse, France, 325MIT, Cambridge, United States, 326IAAT Tuebingen, Germany, 327University of Warwick, United Kingdom, 328Astronomical Institute Anton Pannekoek, University of Amsterdam, The Netherlands, 329Astronomical Institute Anton Pannekoek, University of Amsterdam, The Netherlands, 330University of Erlangen-Nuremberg, Germany, 331NASA/Marshall Space Flight Center, Huntsville, United States, 332MSSL, Surrey, United Kingdom, 333NRL, Washington, United States, 334INFN, Trieste, Italy, 335INFN, Trieste, Italy, 336INAF-OA Padova, Padova, Italy, 337Copernicus Astronomical Center, Warsaw, Poland, 338Copernicus Astronomical Center, Warsaw, Poland, 339University of Nevada, Las Vegas, United States, 340SRON, The Netherlands, 341European Space Agency, ESTEC, The Netherlands, 342European Space Agency, ESTEC, The Netherlands, 343European Space Agency, ESTEC, The Netherlands, 344European Space Astronomy Centre, Madrid, Spain, 345European Space Agency, ESTEC, The Netherlands

The Large Observatory For x-ray Timing (LOFT) was studied within ESA M3 Cosmic Vision framework and participated in the final down-selection for a launch slot in 2022-2024. Thanks to the unprecedented combination of effective area and spectral resolution of its main instrument, LOFT will study the behaviour of matter under extreme conditions, such as the strong gravitational field in the innermost regions of accretion flows close to black holes and neutron stars, and the supra-nuclear densities in the interior of neutron stars. The science payload is based on a Large Area Detector (LAD, 10 m 2 effective area, 2-30 keV, 240 eV spectral resolution, 1 deg collimated field of view) and a WideField Monitor (WFM, 2-50 keV, 4 steradian field of view, 1 arcmin source location accuracy, 300 eV spectral resolution). Read More

2014Jul
Affiliations: 1http://www.iasfbo.inaf.it/~amati/game, 2http://www.iasfbo.inaf.it/~amati/game, 3http://www.iasfbo.inaf.it/~amati/game, 4http://www.iasfbo.inaf.it/~amati/game, 5http://www.iasfbo.inaf.it/~amati/game, 6http://www.iasfbo.inaf.it/~amati/game, 7http://www.iasfbo.inaf.it/~amati/game, 8http://www.iasfbo.inaf.it/~amati/game, 9http://www.iasfbo.inaf.it/~amati/game, 10http://www.iasfbo.inaf.it/~amati/game, 11http://www.iasfbo.inaf.it/~amati/game, 12http://www.iasfbo.inaf.it/~amati/game, 13http://www.iasfbo.inaf.it/~amati/game, 14http://www.iasfbo.inaf.it/~amati/game, 15http://www.iasfbo.inaf.it/~amati/game, 16http://www.iasfbo.inaf.it/~amati/game, 17http://www.iasfbo.inaf.it/~amati/game, 18http://www.iasfbo.inaf.it/~amati/game, 19http://www.iasfbo.inaf.it/~amati/game, 20http://www.iasfbo.inaf.it/~amati/game, 21http://www.iasfbo.inaf.it/~amati/game, 22http://www.iasfbo.inaf.it/~amati/game, 23http://www.iasfbo.inaf.it/~amati/game, 24http://www.iasfbo.inaf.it/~amati/game, 25http://www.iasfbo.inaf.it/~amati/game

We describe the GRB and All-sky Monitor Experiment (GAME) mission submitted by a large international collaboration (Italy, Germany, Czech Repubblic, Slovenia, Brazil) in response to the 2012 ESA call for a small mission opportunity for a launch in 2017 and presently under further investigation for subsequent opportunities. The general scientific objective is to perform measurements of key importance for GRB science and to provide the wide astrophysical community of an advanced X-ray all-sky monitoring system. The proposed payload was based on silicon drift detectors (~1-50 keV), CdZnTe (CZT) detectors (~15-200 keV) and crystal scintillators in phoswich (NaI/CsI) configuration (~20 keV-20 MeV), three well established technologies, for a total weight of ~250 kg and a required power of ~240 W. Read More

We have performed our data analysis of the observations by Swift and Fermi satellites in order to probe the induced gravitational collapse (IGC) paradigm for GRBs associated with supernovae (SNe), in the "terra incognita" of GRB 130427A. We compare and contrast our data analysis with those in the literature. We have verified that the GRB 130427A conforms to the IGC paradigm by examining the power law behavior of the luminosity in the early $10^4$ s of the Swift-XRT observations. Read More

Context: The induced gravitational collapse (IGC) paradigm addresses the very energetic (10^{52}-10^{54}erg) long gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) associated to supernovae (SNe). Unlike the traditional "collapsar" model, an evolved FeCO core with a companion neutron star (NS) in a tight binary system is considered as the progenitor. This special class of sources, here named "binary driven hypernovae" (BdHNe), presents a composite sequence composed of four different episodes [. Read More

Following the recently established "Binary-driven HyperNova" (BdHN) paradigm, we here interpret GRB 970828 in terms of the four episodes typical of such a model. The "Episode 1", up to 40 s after the trigger time t_0, with a time varying thermal emission and a total energy of E_{iso,1st} = 2.60 x 10^{53} erg, is interpreted as due to the onset of an hyper-critical accretion process onto a companion neutron star, triggered by the companion star, an FeCO core approaching a SN explosion. Read More

It has been proposed that the temporal coincidence of a gamma-ray burst (GRB) and a type Ib/c supernova (SN) can be explained with the concept of induced gravitational collapse (IGC), induced by the matter ejected from an SN Ib/c accreting onto a neutron star (NS). We found a standard luminosity light curve behavior in the late-time X-ray emission of this subclass of GRBs. We interpret this as the result of a common physical mechanism in this particular phase of the X-ray emission, possibly related to the creation of the NS from the SN process. Read More

GRB 090510, observed both by Fermi and AGILE satellites, is the first bright short-hard Gamma-Ray Burst (GRB) with an emission from the keV up to the GeV energy range. Within the Fireshell model, we interpret the faint precursor in the light curve as the emission at the transparency of the expanding e+e- plasma: the Proper-GRB (P-GRB). From the observed isotropic energy we assume a total energy Ee+e-=(1. Read More

Context. It has been proposed that the temporal coincidence of a gamma-ray burst (GRB) and a type Ib/c supernova (SN) can be explained with the concept of induced gravitational collapse (IGC), induced by the matter ejected from an SN Ib/c accreting onto a neutron star (NS). The NS is expected to reach the critical mass necessary for it to collapse to a black hole (BH) and emit a GRB. Read More

Context: GRB110709B is the first source for which Swift BAT triggered twice, with a time separation of ~10 min. The first emission (Ep. 1) goes from 40s before the 1{\deg} trigger up to 60s after it. Read More

The possibility to divide GRBs in different subclasses allow to understand better the physics underlying their emission mechanisms and progenitors. The induced gravitational collapse scenario proposes a binary progenitor to explain the time-sequence in GRBs-SNe. We show the existence of a common behavior of the late decay of the X-ray afterglow emission of this subclass of GRBs, pointing to a common physical mechanism of their late emission, consistent with the IGC picture. Read More

The time-resolved spectral analysis of GRB090227B, made possible by the Fermi-GBM data, allows to identify in this source the missing link between the genuine short and long GRBs. Within the Fireshell model [.. Read More

Following the recent theoretical interpretation of GRB 090618 and GRB 101023, we here interpret GRB 970828 in terms of a double episode emission: the first episode, observed in the first 40 s of the emission, is interpreted as the proto-black-hole emission; the second episode, observed after t$_0$+50 s, as a canonical gamma ray burst. The transition between the two episodes marks the black hole formation. The characteristics of the real GRB, in the second episode, are an energy of $E_{tot}^{e^+e^-} = 1. Read More

The joint X and gamma-ray observations of GRB 090618 by a large number of satellites offer an unprecedented possibility of testing crucial aspects of theoretical models. In particular, it allows us to test (a) the formation of an optically thick e+e- baryon plasma self-accelerating to Lorentz factors in the range 200 < g < 3000; (b) its transparency condition with the emission of a component of 10^{53-54} baryons in the TeV region and (c) the collision of these baryons with the circumburst medium clouds, characterized by dimensions of 10^{15-16} cm. In addition, these observations offer the possibility of testing a new understanding of the thermal and power-law components in the early phase of this GRB. Read More

We present the results of the analysis of GRB 101023 in the fireshell scenario. Its redshift has not been determined due to the lack of data in the optical band, so we tried to infer it from the Amati Relation, obtaining z=0.9. Read More

GRB 090618 offered an unprecedented opportunity to have coordinated data, by the best of the X and Gamma Ray observatories, of the nearest (z = 0.54) energetic source (10$^{54}$ erg). Using the Fermi-GBM observations of this GRB, we have analyzed this source to explore the possibility of having components yet to be observed in other sources. Read More