A. F. Gambino

A. F. Gambino
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A. F. Gambino
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High Energy Astrophysical Phenomena (8)
 
Earth and Planetary Astrophysics (1)

Publications Authored By A. F. Gambino

2017Mar
Affiliations: 1Università degli Studi di Palermo, Palermo, Italy, 2INAF, Osservatorio Astronomico di Roma, Monte Porzio Catone, 3Università degli Studi di Palermo, Palermo, Italy, 4ISDC Data Centre for Astrophysics, Versoix, Switzerland, 5Institut de Ciencies de l'Espai, 6Università degli Studi di Palermo, Palermo, Italy, 7Università degli Studi di Cagliari, Dipartimento di Fisica, Monserrato, Italy, 8Institut de Ciencies de l'Espai, 9Osservatorio Astronomico di Capodimonte, Napoli, Italy, 10ESA/ESAC, Science Operations Department Villanueva de la Canada Madrid, Spain, 11Università degli Studi di Palermo, Palermo, Italy, 12ISDC Data Centre for Astrophysics, Versoix, Switzerland, 13INAF, Osservatorio Astronomico di Roma, Monte Porzio Catone

CONTEXT - Transient low-mass X-ray binaries (LMXBs) often show outbursts lasting typically a few-weeks and characterized by a high X-ray luminosity ($L_{x} \approx 10^{36}-10^{38}$ erg/sec), while for most of the time they are found in X-ray quiescence ($L_X\approx10^{31} -10^{33}$ erg/sec). EXO 1745-248 is one of them. AIMS - The broad-band coverage, and the sensitivity of instrument on board of {\xmm} and {\igr}, offers the opportunity to characterize the hard X-ray spectrum during {\exo} outburst. Read More

MXB 1659-298 is a transient neutron star Low-Mass X-ray binary system that shows eclipses in the light curve with a peiodicity of 7.1 hr. MXB 1659-298 on outburst in August 2015 after 14 years of quiescence. Read More

We present the spectral and timing analysis of the X-ray pulsar GRO J1744-28 during its 2014 outburst using data collected with the X-ray satellites Swift, INTEGRAL, Chandra, and XMM-Newton. We derived, by phase-connected timing analysis of the observed pulses, an updated set of the source ephemeris. We were also able to investigate the spin-up of the X-ray pulsar as a consequence of the accretion torque during the outburst. Read More

2017Jan
Affiliations: 1Università di Palermo, 2Università di Palermo, 3Università di Palermo, 4Università di Palermo, 5, Università di Cagliari, 6, Università di Cagliari, 7, Università di Cagliari

Context: Ser X-1 is a well studied LMXB which clearly shows a broad iron line. Recently, Miller et al. (2103) have presented broad-band, high quality NuSTAR data of SerX-1. Read More

The source 4U 1702-429 (Ara X-1) is a low-mass X-ray binary system hosting a neutron star. Albeit the source is quite bright ( $\sim10^{37}$ erg s$^{-1}$) its broadband spectrum has never been studied. Neither dips nor eclipses have been observed in the light curve suggesting that its inclination angle is smaller than 60$^{\circ}$. Read More

We report on the timing analysis of the 2015 outburst of the intermittent accreting millisecond X-ray pulsar SAX J1748.9-2021 observed on March 4 by the X-ray satellite XMM-Newton. By phase-connecting the time of arrivals of the observed pulses, we derived the best-fit orbital solution for the 2015 outburst. Read More

4U 1323-619 is a low mass X-ray binary system that shows type I X-ray bursts and dips. The most accurate estimation of the orbital period is 2.941923(36) hrs and a distance from the source that is lower than 11 kpc has been proposed. Read More

The ultra-compact dipping source \object{XB 1916-053} has an orbital period of close to 50 min and a companion star with a very low mass (less than 0.1 M$_{\odot}$). The orbital period derivative of the source was estimated to be $1. Read More

The atmosphere of a transiting planet shields the stellar radiation providing us with a powerful method to estimate its size and density. In particular, because of their high ionization energy, atoms with high atomic number (Z) absorb short-wavelength radiation in the upper atmosphere, undetectable with observations in visible light. One implication is that the planet should appear larger during a primary transit observed in high energy bands than in the optical band. Read More